New Faculty

The College takes pride in bringing exceptional new faculty to NC State. Since 2000, nearly 70 of our faculty members have earned prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER awards, among the top honors given by the federal agency to early-career faculty in science and engineering.

Annual Lists

Below are links to annual lists of new faculty members from 2007 through the present. Information on each faculty member is relevant to the year the faculty member joined the College of Engineering. Check the departments’ websites for more current information.

Year 2016-17

Dr. Milad AbolhasaniMilad Abolhasani
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Ph.D. (2014), University of Toronto

Abolhasani received his B.S. (2008) and M.A.Sc. (2010) in mechanical engineering from Sharif University of Technology and the University of British Columbia, respectively. He obtained a Ph.D. (2014) from the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto. Over the course of his doctoral studies, he designed and developed a microfluidic platform for fundamental and applied studies of thermodynamic and mass transfer characteristics of gas-liquid reactions. Prior to joining NC State, he was an NSERC postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Chemical Engineering at MIT (Jensen group), where he developed a modular flow chemistry strategy for in-situ mass transfer and kinetic studies of single/ multi-phase chemical processes including bi-phasic cross-coupling reactions, colloidal synthesis and ligand exchange of semiconductor nanocrystals, and partition coefficient screening of pharmaceutical compounds. Currently, the Abolhasani lab is focused on the development of microscale flow chemistry technologies tailored for studies of (a) fundamental mechanisms involved in the solution-phase processing of organohalide lead perovskite nanocrystals for photovoltaic applications, (b) energy efficient photo-thermal recovery of captured carbon dioxide (CO2) from stationary sources, and (c) thermodynamic characteristics of CO2-triggered switchable solvents as a sustainable and green strategy for distillation-free solvent recovery.

Research Interests

Flow chemistry, microfluidics, microscale technologies for energy and environment, continuous nano-manufacturing, microscale transport phenomena

Selected Publications
  • M. Abolhasani and K. F. Jensen, “Oscillatory Multiphase Flow Strategy for Chemistry and Biology,” Lab on a Chip, 2016, 16 (15), 2775-2784.
  • M. Abolhasani, C. W. Coley, L. Xie, O. Chen, M. G. Bawendi, and K. F. Jensen, “Oscillatory Microprocessor for Growth and in Situ Characterization of Semiconductor Nanocrystals,” Chemistry of Materials, 2015, 27 (17), 6131–6138.
  • M. Abolhasani, N. C. Bruno, and K. F. Jensen, “Oscillatory Three-Phase Flow Reactor for Studies of Bi-Phasic Catalytic Reactions,” Chemical Communications, 2015, 51 (43), 8916-8919.

Dr. Ashly CabasAshly Cabas
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
Ph.D. (2016), Virginia Tech

Cabas received her M.S. and Ph.D. in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech. Cabas’ research focuses on geotechnical earthquake engineering, specifically on improving the assessment of site-specific seismic hazards by achieving better predictions of site response, and on quantifying the uncertainty resulting from common simplifying assumptions. Cabas completed her undergraduate studies at Universidad Católica Andrés Bello in Caracas, Venezuela, where she also worked as a civil engineer for nearly two years. She received first place at the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) 2014 Graduate Student Paper Competition for her paper “Vs-ĸ Correction Factors for Input Ground Motions used in Seismic Site Response Analyses.” She recently served as curator of information on geotechnical impacts (specifically landslides and site effects) from the Nepal earthquake of April 25, 2015 as part of the EERI Learning from Earthquakes Program. The goal of her research program is to improve the assessment of seismic hazards by: (a) investigating different physical effects on ground motions, such as the near-surface seismic wave propagation phenomena as encompassed by site and topographic effects as well as soil nonlinear behavior, (b) studying their associated uncertainties; including spatial variability in soil properties, and (c) elucidating the correlation between ground motion parameters and structural response and damage. Her research program will be shaped by well-integrated interdisciplinary efforts and a continuous engagement with engineering practice.

Research Interests

Assessment of seismic hazards with a focus on near-surface effects on ground motions and their associated uncertainties, damping/attenuation characterization for seismic site response analyses and soil-structure interaction

Selected Publications
  • Cabas, A. and Rodriguez-Marek, A. (2016), Vs-ĸ Correction Factors for Input Ground Motions used in Seismic Site Response Analyses, Earthquake Spectra (under review).
  • Cabas, A. and Rodriguez-Marek, A. (2017), What Can We Learn from Kappa to Achieve a Better Characterization of Damping in Geotechnical Site Response Models?, paper submitted to the Geotechnical Frontiers 2017 Conference, in Orlando, Florida, March 12-15, 2017.

Dr. Celso Castro-BolinagaCelso Castro-Bolinaga
Assistant Professor, Department of
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Ph.D. (2016), Virginia Tech

Castro-Bolinaga received his M.S. and Ph.D. in civil engineering from Virginia Tech in December of 2012 and August of 2016, respectively. Castro-Bolinaga completed his undergraduate studies in January of 2009 at Universidad Católica Andrés Bello in Caracas, Venezuela, where he then worked for nearly two years as a hydraulic project engineer in a private consulting firm. His research focuses on the application of computational fluid dynamics to environmental fluid mechanics, and river hydrodynamics and morphodynamics. It encompasses natural processes that are primarily governed by the dynamic interactions among water flow, sediment transport and the geomorphic evolution of the riverbed. Specifically, his work aims to provide a better understanding of how the scales associated with these interactions govern the propagation of large amounts of loose sediment that are suddenly deposited within riverine environments, referred to as sediment pulses.

Research Interests

River mechanics and sediment transport, environmental fluid mechanics, and computational fluid dynamics

Selected Publications
  • Castro-Bolinaga, C.F., and P. Diplas (2014), Hydraulic Modeling of Extreme Hydrologic Events: Case Study in Southern Virginia, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 05014007.
  • Castro-Bolinaga, C.F., E. Zavaleta, and P. Diplas (2014), A Coupled Modeling Effort to Study the Fate of Contaminated Sediments Downstream of the Coles Hill Deposit, Virginia, USA, in: Xu, Y.J. et al. (Eds.) IAHS Publication 367 Sediment Dynamics from the Summit to the Sea, proceedings of a symposium held in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, 11-14 December 2014.
  • Castro-Bolinaga, C.F., P. Diplas, and R.J. Bodnar (2016), An Adaptive Morphodynamic Model for Water Flow, Sediment Transport, and Riverbed Evolution in Alluvial Rivers, Advances in Water Resources (under review).
  • Castro-Bolinaga, C.F., P. Diplas, and R.J. Bodnar (2016), Numerical Analysis of the Propagation of Fine-Grained Sediment Pulses in Alluvial Rivers, Environmental Fluid Mechanics (in preparation).
  • Castro-Bolinaga, C.F., E. Zavaleta, P. Diplas, and R.J. Bodnar (2016), Examining the Fate of Sediment Pulses Under Severe Hydrologic and Hydraulic Conditions, Journal of Hydraulic Research (in preparation).

Dr. Karen ChenKaren Chen
Assistant Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
Ph.D. (2015), University of Wisconsin-Madison

Chen received her B.S. (2009), M.S. (2010), and Ph.D. (2015) in biomedical engineering from University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to joining the Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, she was a postdoctoral research associate at the Healthcare Systems Engineering Institute at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. Her recent research examines patient safety in healthcare systems, specifically examines some critical junctures between primary and specialty care using human factors frameworks and methods. Moreover, she studies human performance while individuals interact with different technologies. She explores the application of virtual reality for chronic neck pain rehabilitation and the interface design of touchscreens for individuals with physical disabilities. These research topics also highlight her experiences in experimental design.

Research Interests

Human factors and ergonomics approaches to understand human performance of different populations, including but not limited to individuals with musculoskeletal conditions and older adults, use of virtual reality, and technologies to study safety and healthcare in various environments

Selected Publications
  • Chen, K.B., Xu, X., Lin, J.-H., Radwin, R. G., Evaluation of Older Driver Head Functional Range of Motion using Portable Immersive Virtual Reality, Experimental Gerontology, 70: 150-156, 2015.
  • Xu, X., Chen, K. B., Lin, J.-H., Radwin, R. G., The accuracy of the Oculus Rift virtual reality head-mounted display during cervical spine mobility measurement, Journal of Biomechanics, 48(4): 721-724, 2015.
  • Chen, K. B., Ponto, K., Tredinnick, R. D., and Radwin, R. G., Virtual Exertions: Evoking the sense of exerting forces in virtual reality using gesture and muscle activity, Human Factors, 57(4): 658-673, 2015.
  • Chen, K. B., Kimmel, R. A., Bartholomew, A., Ponto, K., Gleicher, M. L. and Radwin, R. G., Manually locating physical and virtual reality objects using the hand, Human Factors, 56(6): 1163-76, 2014.

Dr. Patrick DreherPatrick Dreher
Research Professor
Department of Computer Science
Ph.D. (1991), University of Illinois, Urbana

Dreher is a research professor and member of the Graduate Faculty in the Department of Computer Science. In addition, he also holds a joint appointment as a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Dreher has over 25 years of research and R&D management experience in both the application of high performance computing to science and engineering research and in the management of organizations and infrastructure focused on scientific computing. He has served on numerous peer review panels for the Department of Energy, the DoD HPC Modernization Program, and the National Science Foundation. His work in physics is centered on high energy and nuclear physics, especially in the computational aspects pursued within the U.S. Lattice QCD collaboration. Within computer science, he specializes in studying how to effectively apply high performance cloud computing to science and engineering research and works in the area of developing graph algorithms for big data parallel benchmarking. Dreher received his B.S. in physics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, an M.S. in physics from the University of Chicago, and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana. He also earned an M.B.A. from Rensselaer with a concentration in R&D management.

Research Interests

Cloud computing, scientific and high performance computing

Selected Publications
  • Dreher, P., Byun, C., Hill, C., Gadepally, V., Kuszmaul, B., Kepner, J., “PageRank Pipeline Benchmark: Proposal for a Holistic System Benchmark for Big-Data Platforms,” Graph Algorithms Building Blocks (GABB’2016), 30th IEEE International Parallel & Distributed Processing Symposium, IEEE Xplore Digital Library, May 2016.
  • Dreher, P., Vouk, M., “Embedding Cloud Computing Inside Supercomputer Architectures,” In Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Cloud Computing and Services Science, ISBN 978-989-758-182-3, pages 296-301. DOI: 10.5220/0005912302960301, April 2016.
  • Dreher, P, Vouk, M., Scullin, W., “Toward a Proof of Concept Implementation of a Cloud Framework on Blue Gene Supercomputers for Computational Physics Applications,” Journal of Physics: Conference Series Vol 640 (2015).

Dr. Landon GraceLandon Grace
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Ph.D. (2012), University of Oklahoma

Grace received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Missouri and received his M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Oklahoma. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he spent four years as an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering with a secondary appointment in biomedical engineering at the University of Miami. Prior to joining the faculty at Miami in 2012, Grace spent five years as an aerospace engineer with the U.S. Air Force at Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma City. Currently, Grace studies the interaction of polymeric composites with their environment, and attempts to either (a) mitigate or prevent the long-term effects of environmental degradation due largely to fluid contamination or (b) exploit these interactions to achieve novel functionality. This research focus crosses into biomedical and civil/environmental engineering via nanocomposite-based sensors and in vivo degradation of polymeric implants. In the aerospace field, Grace studies diffusion kinetics in polymer composites and the effect of penetrants on both structural and electrical (radar) properties of aircraft/spacecraft composite structures. The majority of this research is experimental but significantly supplemented by theoretical techniques.

Research Interests

Aerospace composite performance and longevity; nanoscale reinforcement of polymeric biomaterials; nanocomposites for sensing applications; diffusion phenomena in polymer and polymer composite materials; environmental degradation in composite materials; polymer composites in radar applications; dielectric property characterization of materials; polymer nanocomposite design, fabrication, and analysis

Selected Publications
  • R. Grace, (2016), “Projecting long-term non-Fickian diffusion behavior in polymeric composites based on short-term data: a 5-year validation study,” J. Materials Science, 51(2), pp. 845-853.
  • Fittipaldi and L.R. Grace (2016), “Lipid diffusion and swelling in a phase separated biocompatible thermoplastic elastomer,” J Mech Behav Biomed Mater. 64: pp 1-9.
  • R. Grace (2015) “The effect of moisture contamination on the relative permittivity of polymeric composite radar-protecting structures at X-band,” Comp. Struct., 128, pp. 305-312.

Dr. Ismail GuvencIsmail Guvenc
Associate Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Ph.D. (2006), University of South Florida

Guvenc received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from University of South Florida (2006) with an outstanding dissertation award. He was with Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs during 2005, and with DOCOMO Innovations Inc. between 2006-12, working as a research engineer. Between August 2012 and August 2016, he has been an assistant professor with Florida International University. His recent research interests include heterogeneous wireless networks and 5G wireless systems. He has published more than 140 conference/journal papers and book chapters, and several standardization contributions. He co-authored/co-edited three books for Cambridge University Press, served as an editor for IEEE Communications Letters (2010-15) and IEEE Wireless Communications Letters (2011-present), and as a guest editor for several other journals. Guvenc is an inventor/coinventor in some 30 U.S. patents. He is a recipient of the 2014 Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award and the 2015 NSF CAREER Award.

Research Interests

5G wireless systems, heterogeneous networks, wireless localization, UAV networks, visible light communications, public safety communications, detection and estimation

Selected Publications
  • Merwaday and I. Guvenc, “Handover Count Based Velocity Estimation and Mobility State Detection in Dense HetNets,” IEEE Trans. Wireless Commun., 2016.
  • Sahin, Y. S. Eroglu, I. Guvenc, N. Pala, M. Yuksel, “Hybrid 3D Localization for Visible Light Communication Systems,” IEEE J. Lightwave Technology, Nov. 2015.
  • Simsek, M. Bennis, and I. Guvenc, “Learning Based Frequency- and Time-Domain Inter-Cell Interference Coordination in HetNets,” IEEE Trans. Vehic. Technol., 2015.
  • Q. S. Quek, G. de la Roche, I. Guvenc, and M. Kountouris (Editors), “Small Cell Networks: Deployment, PHY Techniques,and Resource Management,” Cambridge University Press, April 2013.
  • Sahinoglu, S. Gezici, and I. Guvenc, “Ultra-Wideband Positioning Systems-Theoretical Limits, Ranging Algorithms, and Protocols,” Cambridge University Press, Aug. 2008.

Dr. Steven HallSteven Hall
Associate Professor
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Director, Marine Aquaculture Research Center (Marshallberg, NC)
Ph.D. (1998), Cornell University, Ithaca NY; PE (NY, LA)

Hall earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo, an M.S. in agricultural engineering from the University of California at Davis and a Ph.D. in biological and agricultural engineering at Cornell University. He was the first postdoctoral fellow in Sustainable Agriculture at McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was assistant, associate and full professor; and graduate chair at Louisiana State University (LSU) and the LSU AgCenter in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where he held appointments in biological and agricultural engineering and was on the faculty at the LSU AgCenter Aquaculture Research Station. His current projects include engineering approaches to understanding effects of environmental variables including temperature, salinity and water quality on health of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica, and design of bioengineered systems for culture of aquatic species for coastal protection and restoration, and for food and other resources. Other species of interest include sturgeon, tilapia, salmonids, crustaceans and aquatic plants. Designs and studies focus on biological, smart and automated solutions to aquacultural, environmental and coastal challenges with an interest in enhancing sustainability. He collaborates with a variety of academic, industrial and environmental professionals as director of the NC State University Marine Aquaculture Research Center at Marshallberg, with teaching, research and extension appointments. Hall is past president of the Aquacultural Engineering Society, Fellow of the American Scientific Affiliation, and has received numerous teaching, research and outreach awards.

Research Interests

Aquacultural engineering, coastal bioengineering, energy, water and resource efficiency in agricultural and aquacultural systems, automated systems in biological engineering, environmental sustainability engineering

Selected Publications
  • Rybovich, M., M. LaPeyre, S. Hall, J. LaPeyre, 2016. Increased temperatures Combined with Lowered Salinities Differentially Impact Oyster Size Class Growth and Mortality. Shellfish Rsch. 35:1, 101-113.

Dr. Kevin HanKevin Han
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
Ph.D. (2016), University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Han received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. While pursuing his doctoral degree, he received a Master of Computer Science and served as a part-time faculty member at Parkland Community College. He also received a M.S. in civil engineering and B.A. in architecture at the University of California at Berkeley. His work experience includes numerous internships (one of which is with Caterpillar Inc, where he has filed two patents), and full-time engineering experience as a design/field engineer at the Samsung Austin Semiconductor Plant in Texas.

Research Interests

Visual data analytics for managing civil infrastructure systems. Subtopics to include: autonomous data collection using unmanned vehicles (i.e., UAV and UGV), computer vision algorithm development – 3D reconstruction, SLAM, localization, and object recognition – for automated civil structure detection and quality assessment

Selected Publications
  • Han, K., Cline, D., and Golparvar-Fard, M. (2015). Formalized Knowledge of Construction Sequencing for Visual Sensing-based Automated Progress Monitoring. Advanced Engineering Informatics.
  • Han, K., and Golparvar-Fard, M. (2015). Appearance-based Material Classification for Monitoring of Operation-level Construction Progress using 4D BIM and Site Photologs. Automation in Construction, Vol. 53. pg 44-57.
  • Han, K., Muthukumar, B. and Golparvar-Fard, M. (2016). Enhanced Appearance-based Material Classification for Monitoring of Operation-level Construction Progress through Removal of Occlusions, 2016 Construction Research Congress, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 31 – Jun. 2, 2016.
  • Han, K., and Golparvar-Fard, M. (2015). Information Requirement for Model-based Construction Monitoring via Emerging Big Visual Data and BIM: A Case Study, 6th International Conference on Construction Engineering and Project Management, Busan, Korea, Oct. 11-14, 2015.
  • Han, K., and Golparvar-Fard, M. (2015). The Role of Integrated Plan and As-Built Models in Achieving Smooth Flow of Production in Construction, International Conference on Innovative Production and Construction (IPC 2015), Perth, Australia, July 28-31, 2015.

Dr. Jason HouJason Hou
Research Assistant Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
Ph.D. (2013), The Pennsylvania State University

Hou received his B.S. in engineering physics from Tsinghua University, China. He holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engineering from the University of Michigan and Pennsylvania State University, respectively. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at University of California, Berkeley. Hou considers himself an advocate of nuclear energy and the mission of his research is to promote nuclear energy by investigating advanced reactor designs and developing improved reactor modeling and simulation methods. In particular, he develops accurate yet efficient numerical models to improve the reactor design in various aspects including the economics, safety, proliferation resistance and sustainability. Currently, he also performs studies on the uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis in the nuclear system modeling and the improvement of high-fidelity reactor core simulator.

Research Interests

Multi-physics reactor simulation, advanced reactor design, in-core fuel management and fuel cycle analysis

Selected Publications
  • Hou, S. Qvist, R. Kellogg and E. Greenspan, “3D In-core Fuel Management Optimization for Breed-and-Burn Reactors,” Progress in Nuclear Energy, vol 88, pp. 58-74 (2016).
  • Hou, H. Choi and K. Ivanov, “Development of An Iterative Diffusion-Transport Method based on MICROX-2 Cross Section Libraries,” Annals of Nuclear Energy, vol 77, pp. 335-342 (2015).

Dr. Lilian HsiaoLilian Hsiao
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Ph.D. (2014), University of Michigan

Hsiao earned her B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2007) and her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan (2014). She studied nanoemulsion-filled responsive hydrogels during her postdoctoral research at MIT. She is the recipient of the Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for outstanding doctoral dissertations. The Hsiao group seeks to apply the fundamental understanding of colloidal particles and their microscopic interactions to design soft matter with unusual macroscopic properties. Hsiao is interested in linking the flow and mechanical properties of soft materials to their microscale dynamics and structure. Much of her work will involve using experimental and modeling techniques to design systems for which there is complete control over the particle shape, surface chemistry and assembly kinetics. Anisotropic particles, multi-dimensional lithographic printing and a combination of highspeed confocal microscopy and rheological methods will be used to achieve optimal mechanical and functional properties in a broad class of bio-inspired materials.

Research Interests

Soft matter and colloids, complex fluids, biomimetic and responsive Materials

Selected Publications
  • C. Hsiao & P. S. Doyle. Sequential phase transitions in thermoresponsive nanoemulsions. Soft Matter 11, 8426-8431 (2015).
  • C. Hsiao, B. A. Schultz, J. Glaser, M. Engel, M. E. Szakasits, S. C. Glotzer & M. J. Solomon. Metastable orientational order of colloidal discoids. Nature Communications 6, 8507 (2015).
  • C. Hsiao, H. Kang*, K. H. Ahn & M. J. Solomon. Role of shear-induced dynamical heterogeneity in the nonlinear rheology of colloidal gels. Soft Matter 10, 9254-9259 (2014).
  • C. Hsiao, K. A. Whitaker*, M. J. Solomon & E. M. Furst. A model colloidal gel for coordinated measurements of force, structure, and rheology. Journal of Rheology 58(5), 1485-1505 (2014).
  • C. Hsiao, R. S. Newman, S. C. Glotzer & M. J. Solomon. Role of isostaticity and loadbearing microstructure in the elasticity of yielded colloidal gels. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109(40), 16029-16034 (2012).

Dr. Arnav JhalaArnav Jhala
Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science
Co-Director, Visual Narrative Cluster
Co-Director, Digital Games Research Initiative
Ph.D. (2009), NC State University

Jhala received his B.S. in computer engineering from Gujarat University (2001) and M.S. (2004) and Ph.D. (2009) in computer science from NC State University. Jhala’s research group investigates computational structures and methods that are useful in representing and mediating human interpretation and communication of narrative in interactive visual media, such as film and games. The Jhala research group uses symbolic and probabilistic tools to represent and construct coherent visual discourse and apply generative techniques for automated and semi-automated tools to interpret and collaboratively create visual narratives. Past projects include development of games for eliciting aesthetic and emotive preferences in domains such as photographic composition, aesthetics of play for highly skilled game players and gestural aesthetics of dance. Methods used in the lab vary from analysis of existing data sets (such as analysis of movies or game replays), development of games and systems to elicit specific type of behavior and development of novel designs to push the boundaries of creativity through computation.

Research Interests

Computational models of narrative, artificial intelligence in games, visual aesthetics and computer supported game design, human-computer interaction

Selected Publications
  • Jhala A., Young R M., Cinematic Visual Discourse: Representation, Generation, and Evaluation, IEEE Transactions on Computational Intelligence and AI in Games 2 (2), 69-81.
  • Yannakakis G., Martínez H., Jhala A., Towards affective camera control in games, User Modeling and User-Adapted Interaction 20 (4), 313-340.
  • Swanson R., Escoffery D., Jhala A., Learning Visual Composition Preferences from an Annotated Corpus Generated Through Gameplay, IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence in Games (CIG), 2012.
  • Weber B., John M., Mateas M., Jhala A., Modeling Player Retention in Madden NFL-11. AAAI Conference on Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence (IAAI), Deployed AI track, 2011.

Dr. Derek KamperDerek Kamper
Associate Professor
UNC/NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering
Ph.D. (1997), Ohio State University

Kamper received a B.E. in electrical engineering from Dartmouth College, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in biomedical engineering from Ohio State University. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Northwestern University and the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, where he subsequently worked as a research scientist. He later joined the faculty at the Illinois Institute of Technology, eventually becoming an associate professor. His research has focused on improving functional outcomes for individuals following neurological injury, such as spinal cord injury or stroke. In particular, Kamper has worked to understand the mechanisms leading to impairment, through both experiments and modeling. Knowledge obtained from these studies has led to the development of therapeutic interventions, including actuated orthotic gloves and virtual reality training environments.

Research Interests

Upper extremity rehabilitation, hand neuromechanics and modeling, mechatronic devices and virtual reality for therapy

Selected Publications
  • Fisher H, Triandafilou K, Thielbar K, Ochoa J, Lazzaro E, Pacholski K, Kamper D. Use of a portable assistive glove to facilitate rehabilitation in stroke survivors with severe hand impairment. IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, 2016; 24: 344-51.
  • Qian K, Traylor K, Lee SW, Ellis B, Weiss J, Kamper D. Mechanical properties vary for different regions of the finger extensor apparatus. Journal of Biomechanics 2014; 47: 3094-9.
  • Kamper DG, Fischer HC, Conrad MO, Towles JD, Rymer WZ, Triandafilou K. Fingerthumb coupling contributes to exaggerated thumb flexion in stroke survivors. Journal of Neurophysiology 2014; 111: 2665-2674.
  • Jones C, Wang F, Morrison R, Sarkar N, Kamper D. Design and development of a cable actuated finger exoskeleton for hand rehabilitation following stroke. IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, 2012; 19: 131-140.
  • Lee SW, Wilson KM, Lock BA, Kamper DG. Subject-specific myoelectric pattern classification of functional hand movements for stroke survivors. IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering 2011; 19: 558-66.

Dr. Djamel KaoumiDjamel Kaoumi
Associate Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
Ph.D. (2007), The Pennsylvania State University

Kaoumi received his B.S. in physics from the Institut polytechnique de Grenoble (France). He received his M.S. in nuclear engineering with a minor in materials science from the University of Florida, and a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the Pennsylvania State University. Then, he was a postdoctoral researcher for PSU/ ANL in the Division of Nuclear Engineering. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was an associate professor of nuclear engineering in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of South Carolina. Kaoumi’s goal is to develop a mechanistic understanding of microstructureproperty relationships, with an emphasis on microstructure evolution under harsh environment (i.e. irradiation, high temperature, and mechanical stress) and how it can impact the macroscopic properties and performance. Understanding the basic mechanisms of degradation of materials at the nanostructure level is necessary for the development of predictive models of the materials performance and for the design and development of better materials. Materials of interest include advanced alloys for structural and cladding applications in advanced nuclear systems (e.g. austenitic steels, advanced ferritic/martensitic steels, oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels), high-temperature ni-based alloys, zirconium alloys and nanocrystalline metallic systems. Characterization techniques of predilection include both in-situ and ex-situ techniques e.g. in-situ irradiation in TEM, in-situ straining in a TEM, electron microscopy techniques, XRD, and synchrotron XRD.

Research Interests

Nuclear materials; effect of irradiation, temperature, and mechanical stress on the microstructure of materials

Selected Publications
  • Kaoumi, T. Gautier, J. Adamson, M. Kirk, 2015, “Using In-Situ TEM to characterize the Microstructure evolution of Metallic Systems under External Solicitation,” Microscopy and Microanalysis, V. 21 S3.
  • R.Allen, D. Kaoumi, et al., 2015, “Characterization of Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct: Materials exposed to High Dose and Elevated Temperature,” Journal of Materials Research, v 30, n 9, p 1246-1274.

Dr. Chris MartensChris Martens
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
Ph.D. (2015), Carnegie Mellon University

Martens received her B.S. in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 2008, after which she joined the Ph.D. program at the same institution. She has done research internships at Google New York and INRIA, Palaiseau, France, on type systems and logical frameworks. Her thesis included the development of a new knowledge representation for generative narrative and a new programming language for game modeling called Ceptre. She was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Santa Cruz, until July 2016, where she worked on generative game design. Her current research continues the thread of declarative, logic-based methods for modeling agents, simulations, and mechanics in games and interactive storytelling. She is interested in building more robust mathematical models and more collaborative programming environments for executing and analyzing expressive systems.

Research Interests

Game design tools, programming languages, declarative modeling, interactive narrative, generative methods

Selected Publications
  • Chris Martens and Rogelio Cardona-Rivera. Discourse-driven Comic Generation. Proceedings of the International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS) 2016 (to appear).
  • Chris Martens, Adam Summerville, Michael Mateas, Sarah Harmon, Noah Wardrip- Fruin, and Arnav Jhala. Proceduralist Readings, Procedurally, Proceedings of the Experimental Al in Games Workshop (EXAG) 2016 (to appear).
  • Chris Martens. Ceptre: A Language for Modeling Generative Interactive Systems. Proceedings of the Artificial Intelligence in Interactive Digital Entertainment (AIIDE) 2015.
  • Chris Martens, Joao Ferreira, Anne-Gwenn Bosser, and Marc Cavazza. Generative Story Worlds as Linear Logic Programs. Proceedings of Intelligent Narrative Technologies (INT) 7, 2014.
  • Chris Martens, Anne-Gwenn Bosser, Joao F. Ferreira, and Marc Cavazza. Linear Logic Programming for Narrative Generation. Proceedings of Logic Programming and Nonmonotonic Reasoning (LPNMR) 2013.

Dr. Alessandra ScafuroAlessandra Scafuro
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
Ph.D. (2013), University of Slerno, Italy

Scafuro received her B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Salerno, in Italy. She was a postdoctoral researcher at the Computer Science Department at UCLA. Prior to joining NC State, she held a joint post-doctoral position at Boston University and Northeastern University. Presently, she studies the problem of designing protocols for secure computation. The goal of secure computation is to allow several parties to compute a function of their joint inputs in such a way that all participants learn the output of the function but do not learn the inputs of the other parties. This problem is relevant in scenarios where multiple parties are interested in evaluating function on sensitive data that must remain private, for example, running tests on medical records. While from a theoretical point of view, this problem has been extensively studied, the challenge today is to design protocols that are efficient and usable in real world applications, such as analysis of large data sets.

Research Interests

Theoretical foundations, practical applications of cryptography

Selected Publications
  • Hemenway, Z. Jafargholi, R. Ostrovsky, A. Scafuro, D. Wichs. “Adaptively Secure Garbled Circuits from One-Way Function,” Advances in Cryptology– CRYPTO 2016.
  • Garg, S. Lu, R. Ostroovsky, Alessandra Scafuro. “Garbled RAM From One-Way Functions,” Symposium on the Theory of Computing– STOC 2015.
  • Ostrovsky, S. Richelson, A. Scafuro. “Round-Optimal Black-Box Two-Party Computation,” Advances in Cryptology– CRYPTO 2015.
  • Goyal, R. Ostrovsky, A. Scafuro, I. Visconti. “Black-Box Non-black-Box Zero Knowledge,” Symposium on the Theory of Computing– STOC 2014.
  • Canetti, A. Jain, A. Scafuro. “Practical UC security with a Global Random Oracle,” Conference on Computer and Communications Security– CSS 2014.

Dr. Eunkyoung ShimEunkyoung Shim
Assistant Professor
Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science
Ph.D. (2001), NC State University

Shim received her B.S. and M.S. in clothing and textiles from Seoul National University. She received her Ph.D. in fiber and polymer science from NC State University. She joined the Department of Textile Engineering as an assistant professor in 2016. This appointment followed 15 years of experience in the Nonwovens Institute as a research assistant professor and research associate. Shim studies fundamental mechanism of nonwoven processes and applies this knowledge to control structures and properties of nonwovens as engineered products. This includes visualization and analysis of complex 2D and 3D fibrous structures of nonwovens to study their forming mechanism as well as how these structures influence performance and functionality of nonwovens. Her research also includes functionalizing nonwovens to impart unique properties for various applications. Filtration is one application area of her research. Her major focus on nonwoven filter media research is electrostatic charging mechanism and controlling structure of nonwoven filter media to achieve high efficiency at low resistance. Fiber formations is another area of her research. She studies effects of polymer properties on spinnability and polymer crystalline structure formation and uses various melt additives during the spinning to impart functionality on fibers.

Research Interests

Mechanism of nonwoven manufacturing process and process-structureproperty relationship, high surface area nonwovens-production, functionalization and applications, bulk and surface modification of nonwovens and fibers, fiber formation and the role of additives during melt spinning and spunbond process, and nonwoven Filter media

Selected Publications
  • Shim, B. Pourdeyhimi, D. Shiffler (2016), Process-structure- property relationship of melt spun poly (lactic acid ) fiber produced in the spunbond process, DOI: 10.1002/ app.4422.
  • Kilic, E. Shim & B. Pourdeyhimi, Electrostatic Capture Efficiency Enhancement of Polypropylene Electret Filters with Barium Titanate, Aerosol Science and Technology, 49(8):666-673 (2015).
  • Amirnasr, E. Shim, B. Y. Yeom, and B. Pourdeyhimi, Basis weight uniformity analysis in nonwovens, Journal of Textile Institute, 105(4), 444-453 (2014).

Dr. Kathryn StoleeKathryn Stolee
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
Ph.D. (2013), University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Stolee received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She was the Harpole- Pentair Assistant Professor of Software Engineering at Iowa State University from 2013–15 before starting at NC State as an assistant professor of computer science in January 2016. Currently, Stolee studies software developers, the tools they use, and the programs they write. She is currently exploring how developers use web search to assist with programming and software development activities, developing an approach to automated program repair through semantic code search and building a framework to support testing and analysis of regular expressions. This research all involves a blend of theory, empirical studies and tool development.

Research Interests

Software engineering, program analysis, code search, crowd sourcing, program repair

Selected Publications
  • Carl Chapman, Kathryn T. Stolee, “Exploring regular expression usage and context in Python.” International Conference on Software Testing and Analysis (ISSTA) 2016: 282-293.
  • Yalin Ke, Kathryn T. Stolee, Claire Le Goues, Yuriy Brun, “Repairing Programs with Semantic Code Search.” Automated Software Engineering (ASE) 2015: 295-306.
  • Caitlin Sadowski, Kathryn T. Stolee, Sebastian G. Elbaum, “How developers search for code: a case study.” ESEC/SIGSOFT FSE 2015: 191-201.
  • Kathryn T. Stolee, Sebastian G. Elbaum, Daniel Dobos, “Solving the Search for Source Code.” ACM Trans. Software Engineering Methodology 23(3): 26 (2014).
  • Kathryn T. Stolee, Sebastian G. Elbaum, Matthew B. Dwyer, “Code search with input/ output queries: Generalizing, ranking, and assessment.” Journal of Systems and Software 116: 35-48 (2016).

Dr. Hung-Wei TsengHung-Wei Tseng
Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science
Ph.D. (2014), University of California, San Diego

Tseng received his Ph.D. in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at University of California, San Diego, under the advising of Professor Dean Tullsen. His thesis work, “Data-triggered threads” was selected by IEEE Micro “Top Picks from Computer Architecture” in 2012. Prior to joining NC State, Tseng was a postdoctoral researcher for the Non-Volatile Systems Laboratory of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at University of California, San Diego working with Professor Steven Swanson. Tseng is interested in designing innovative computer architectures, storage systems and runtime systems for data-intensive applications. In addition to computer architecture, storage systems and runtime systems, Tseng also has research experience in various areas including programming languages, compilers, embedded systems, computer networks and bioinformatics.

Research Interests

High-performance, energy-efficient heterogeneous computer architecture, intelligent fast, non-volatile storage systems, improving application performance through programming languages and compiling techniques

Selected Publications
  • Hung-Wei Tseng, Qianchen Zhao, Yuxiao Zhou, Mark Gahagan, and Steven Swanson. Morpheus: Creating application objects efficiently for heterogeneous computing. In 43rd International Symposium on Computer Architecture, ISCA 2016, 2016.
  • Hung-Wei Tseng and Dean M. Tullsen. CDTT: Compiler-generated data-triggered threads. In 20th International Symposium on High Performance Computer Architecture, HPCA 2014, pages 650–661, 2014.
  • Hung-Wei Tseng and Dean M. Tullsen. Software data-triggered threads. In ACM SIGPLAN 2012 Conference on Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications, OOPSLA 2012, pages 703–716, 2012.
  • Hung-Wei Tseng and Dean M. Tullsen. Eliminating redundant computation and exposing parallelism through data-triggered threads. IEEE Micro, Special Issue on the Top Picks from Computer Architecture Conferences, volume 32:38–47, 2012.
  • Hung-Wei Tseng, Laura M. Grupp, and Steven Swanson. Understanding the impact of power loss on flash memory. In 48th Design Automation Conference, DAC 2011, pages 35–40, 2011.

Dr. Victor VeliadisVictor Veliadis
Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
CTO, PowerAmerica
Ph.D. (1995), Johns Hopkins University

Veliadis received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Johns Hopkins University in 1995. From 1996 to 2000, he was with Nanocrystals Imaging Corporation where he developed quantum-dot phosphors for imaging applications. From 2000 to 2003, he designed InP-based tunable photonic integrated circuits for telecommunication applications at Lucent Technologies. In 2003, Veliadis was adjunct physics professor at Ursinus College and St. Joseph University. After a brief military service, he joined Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems in 2004 where he worked on wide bandgap semiconductor devices and circuits. As of May 2016, he is CTO of PowerAmerica and professor of electrical and computer engineering at NC State. Veliadis has authored 105 peer-reviewed technical articles and three book chapters and has 23 issued patents to his credit.

Research Interests

Wide bandgap power semiconductor devices and electronics

Selected Publications
  • Veliadis, B. Steiner, K. Lawson, S. B. Bayne, D. Urciuoli, and H. C. Ha, “Suitability of N-ON recessed implanted gate vertical-channel SiC JFETs for optically triggered 1200 V solid-state-circuit-breakers,” accepted to Special Issue on Wide Bandgap Devices of the IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics, 2016.
  • Veliadis, M. Snook, S. Woodruff, B. Nechay, H. Hearne, C. Lavoie, D. Giorgi, M. Ingram, “6.9-cm2 Active-area Interconnected Wafer 4 kV PiN Diode pulsed at 55 kA,” accepted for publication at Special Issue on Wide Bandgap Devices of the IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics, 2016.
  • N. Pushpakaran, M. Hinojosa, S. B. Bayne, V. Veliadis, D. Urciuoli, N. El-Hinnawy, P. Borodulin, S. Gupta, and C. Scozzie, “Evaluation of SiC JFET Performance during Repetitive Pulsed Switching into an Unclamped Inductive Load,” IEEE Trans. on Plasma Science, vol. 42, No. 10, pp. 2968-2973, 2014.
  • Veliadis, B. Steiner, K. Lawson, S. B. Bayne, D. Urciuoli, H. C. Ha, N. El-Hinnawy, S. Gupta, P. Borodulin, R. S. Howell, and C. Scozzie, “Reliable Operation of SiC JFET Subjected to Over 2.4 Million 1200-V/115-A Hard Switch Stressing Events at 150 C,” IEEE Electron Dev. Lett., Vol. 34, No. 3, pp. 384-386, 2013.
  • Veliadis, H. Hearne, E. J. Stewart, M. Snook, W. Chang, J. D. Caldwell, H. C. Ha, N. El-Hinnawy, P. Borodulin, R. S. Howell, D. Urciuoli, and C. Scozzie, “Degradation and full recovery in high-voltage implanted-gate SiC JFETs subjected to bipolar-current stress,” IEEE Electron Dev. Lett., Vol. 33, No. 7, pp. 952-954, 2012.

Dr. Tianfu WuTianfu Wu
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering; The NC State Visual Narrative Cluster
Ph.D. (2011), University of California, Los Angeles

Wu received his two-year college in electronic engineering and information science from University of Science and Technology of China. He received his M.S. in signal and information processing from Hefei University of Technology, China, and Ph.D. in statistics from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He was a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Statistics at UCLA. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was research assistant professor of statistics in the Department of Statistics at UCLA. His research has been focused on computer vision and life-long communicative learning from the perspective of statistical modeling, inference and learning: (a) Statistical learning of large scale and highly expressive hierarchical and compositional models from visual big data (images and videos), (b) Statistical inference by learning near-optimal costsensitive decision policies, (c) Statistical theory of performance guaranteed learning algorithm and optimally scheduled inference procedure and (d) Statistical framework of visual Turing test and life-long communicative learning.

Research Interests

Statistical learning, machine learning, big data; statistical inference, sequential hypothesis testing, decision policy; statistical theory, performance guarantee; computer vision, and pattern analysis

Selected Publications
  • Tianfu Wu, Bo Li and Song-Chun Zhu, “Learning And-Or Models to Represent Context and Occlusion for Car Detection and Viewpoint Estimation,” IEEE Trans. on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (TPAMI, Accepted), arXiv 1501.07359, 2016.
  • Hang Qi*, Tianfu Wu*, Mun Wai Lee and Song-Chun Zhu, “A Restricted Visual Turing Test for Deep Scene and Event Understanding”, arXiv 1512.01715, 2015 (*Equal Contribution).
  • Tianfu Wu and Song-Chun Zhu, “Learning Near-Optimal Cost-Sensitive Decision Policy for Object Detection,” IEEE Trans. on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (TPAMI), 37(5): 1013-1027, 2014.
  • Adrian Barbu, Tianfu Wu and Ying Nian Wu, “Learning Mixtures of Bernoulli Templates by Two-Round EM with Performance Guarantee,” Electronic Journal of Statistics (EJS), vol.8, no.2, p.3004–3030, 2014.

Dr. Xu XuXu Xu
Assistant Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
Ph.D. (2008), NC State University

Xu received his B.S. in industrial engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from NC State University. He was a postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Public Health at Harvard University. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was a research scientist in Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety. His research interests are generally in the areas of biomechanical modeling, optimization, simulation and data mining with respect to human daily activates to promote workplace and at-home injury prevention and driving safety.

Research Interests

Human factors and ergonomics engineering, occupational biomechanics, optimization-based biomechanical modelling, data mining on human motion data, occupational musculoskeletal injury prevention

Selected Publications
  • Xu, X., Dickerson, C., McGorry, R.W. Lin, J.H. (2016). Evaluation of regression-based 3-D shoulder rhythms. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology 29, 28-33.
  • Xu, X., McGorry, R.W., Chou, L.S., Lin, J.H., Chang, C.C. (2015). Accuracy of the Microsoft KinectTM for measuring gait parameters during treadmill walking. Gait and Posture 42, 145-151.
  • Xu, X., Lin, J.H. (2015). The effects of working environment factors and user experiences on mechanical properties of upper extremity during powered hand tool use. IIE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors 3, 81-90.
  • Xu, X., Qin, J., Catena, R. D., Faber, G. S., Lin, J.H. (2013). Effect of aging on inter-joint synergies during machine-paced assembly tasks. Experimental Brain Research 231, 249-256.
  • Xu, X., Faber, G.S., Kingma, I., Chang, C.C., Hsiang, S.M. (2013). The error of L5/S1 joint moment calculation in a body-centered non-inertial reference frame when the fictitious force is ignored. Journal of Biomechanics 46, 1943-1947.

Dr. Yuan YaoYuan Yao
Assistant Professor of Sustainability Science and Engineering
Department of Forest Biomaterials
College of Natural Resources
Ph.D. (2016), Northwestern University

Yao received a B.S. in metallurgical engineering from Northeastern University, China, in 2011. She then joined Energy and Resource System Analysis Laboratory at Northwestern University, where she received a Ph.D. in chemical engineering in 2016. During that time, she was selected to the program of Management for Scientists and Engineers from Kellogg School of Management. Yao’s research focuses on building analytical models to quantify environmental/economic/social implications of emerging technologies in industrial systems, such as carbon capture, clean energy technologies, and incremental process improvements. Her work links fundamental engineering systems with scaled economic, environmental and social impacts. In particular, she develops decision support tools to analyze alternative scenarios and identify behavioral, technological and policy pathways toward a more sustainable future for manufacturing industries.

Research Interests

Industrial ecology, sustainable engineering, and operations research life cycle assessment, industrial process modeling and process optimization

Selected Publications
  • Yao, Y., et al. (2016). “Prospective Life Cycle Assessment of Emerging Technology Options for U.S. Ethylene Industry.” Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research. 2016, 55 (12), pp 3493–3505.
  • Yao, Y., et al. (2015). “Understanding Variability to Reduce the Energy and GHG Footprints of U.S. Ethylene Production.” Environmental Science and Technology, 49, 14704.
  • Yao, Y., et al. (2014). “Greener Pathways to Energy-Intensive Commodity Chemicals: Opportunities and Challenges.” Current Opinion in Chemical Engineering, 6:90-98.
  • Yao, Y., et al. (2014). “A Hybrid Life-Cycle Inventory for Multi-crystalline Silicon PV Module Manufacturing in China.” Environmental Research Letters. 9:114001.
  • Gebreslassie, B.H., Yao, Y., and F. You (2012). “Design Under Uncertainty of Hydrocarbon Biorefinery Supply Chains: Multiobjective Stochastic Programming Models, Decomposition Algorithm, and a Comparison Between CVaR and Downside Risk.” AIChE Journal, 58: 2155-2179, 2012.

Dr. David ZaharoffDavid Zaharoff
Associate Professor
UNC/NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering
Ph.D. (2002), Duke University

Zaharoff received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Duke University. He was a Cancer Research Training Award and Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award postdoctoral fellow in the Laboratory for Tumor Immunology and Biology at the National Cancer Institute. Prior to joining NC State, he was interim head, associate professor and a founding faculty member of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Arkansas As an independent investigator, Zaharoff leverages his multidisciplinary training to engineer translatable biomaterials-based delivery systems to control the spatiotemporal distribution of immunomodulatory agents, with a particular interest in IL-12 family cytokines and immune checkpoint inhibitors.

Research Interests

Cancer immunotherapy, immunoengineering, biomaterials-based delivery and immunomodulation

Selected Publications
  • Zaharoff DA et al. 2009, “Intravesical immunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer with chitosan/interleukin-12.” Cancer Res 69(15):6192-9.
  • Zaharoff DA et al. 2010, “Intratumoral immunotherapy of established solid tumors with chitosan/IL-12.” J Immunother 33(7):697-705.
  • Vo JL et al. 2014 “Neoadjuvant immunotherapy with chitosan and interleukin-12 to control breast cancer metastasis.” Oncoimmunology 3(12):e968001.
  • Koppolu BP et al. 2014, “Controlling chitosan-based encapsulation for protein and vaccine delivery.” Biomaterials 35(14):4382-9.
  • Smith SG et al. 2015, “Intravesical chitosan/interleukin-12 immunotherapy induces tumor-specific systemic immunity against murine bladder cancer.” Cancer Immunol Immunother 64(6):689-96.

Year 2015-16

Dr. Veronica Augustyn

Veronica Augustyn
Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Ph.D. (2013), University of California, Los Angeles

Augustyn received her B.S. in materials science and engineering from the University of Arizona. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from University of California, Los Angeles working with Bruce Dunn. She was a postdoctoral fellow at the Texas Materials Institute at the University of Texas at Austin working with Arumugam Manthiram.

Her current research involves understanding materials at electrochemical interfaces during energy storage and conversion. In particular, she is interested in how materials store charge via intercalation reactions and the mechanisms by which these materials degrade during long term operation. This research is motivated by the need for low-cost, long-lasting and safe energy storage for sustainable power grids. In addition, she is interested in how material architecture affects electrocatalytic activity, particularly for the oxygen evolution reaction that is necessary for electrochemical hydrogen production for fuel cells and rechargeable metal/air batteries. She also leads SciBridge, a multi-university project aiming to increase renewable energy research collaborations between Africa and the U.S.

Research Interests

Electrochemical energy storage and conversion, nanomaterials, solid state ionics and functional materials

Selected Publications
  • Augustyn, V.; Come, J.; Lowe, M. A.; Kim, J. W.; Taberna, P.-L.; Tolbert, S. H.; Abruña, H. D.; Simon, P.; Dunn, B. High-Rate Electrochemical Energy Storage through Li+ Intercalation Pseudocapacitance. Nat. Mater. 2013, 12, 518–522.
  • Colligan, N.; Augustyn, V.; Manthiram, A. Evidence of Localized Lithium Removal in Layered and Lithiated Spinel Li1-xCoO2 (0 < x < 0.9) under Oxygen Evolution Reaction Conditions. J. Phys. Chem. C 2015, 119, 2335–2340.
  • Augustyn, V.; White, E. R.; Ko, J.; Grüner, G.; Regan, B. C.; Dunn, B. Lithium-Ion Storage Properties of Titanium Oxide Nanosheets. Mater. Horizons. 2014, 1, 219–223.
  • Augustyn, V.; Simon, P.; Dunn, B. Pseudocapacitive Oxide Materials for High-Rate Electrochemical Energy Storage. Energy Environ. Sci. 2014, 7, 1597–1614.

Dr. Maria AvramovaMaria Avramova
Associate Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
Ph.D. (2007), Pennsylvania State University

Avramova earned her Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in 2007. Prior to joining NC State, she held assistant and associate professor positions at Pennsylvania State University (2009 – August 2015) and a research scientist position at the Institute of Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Science, in Sofia, Bulgaria (1994 – 2001). While at PSU, Avramova led the Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group. Her expertise and experience are in the area of developing methods and computer codes for multi-dimensional reactor analysis. Her background includes development, verification and validation of thermal-hydraulics subchannel; porous media; and computational fluid dynamics models and codes for reactor design, transient and safety computational analysis. She has led high visibility international projects such as the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA) / United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC) BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark and the OECD-NEA/U.S.NRC PWR Subchannel and Bundle Tests (PSBT) benchmark. She is also one of the coordinators of the OECD LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) Benchmark.

Avramova is leading a team participating in the Department of Energy (DOE) Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) project by maintaining, developing, coupling, verifying and validating the advanced subchannel code CTF as part of the CASL VERA (Virtual Environment for Reactor Application) system.

Research Interests

High-fidelity multi-physics simulations involving coupling of reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics and fuel performance models, as well as on uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of reactor design and safety calculations

Selected Publications
  • M. Avramova, et al., “Multi-physics and Multi-Scale Benchmarking and Uncertainty Quantification within NEA/OECD Framework”, Annals of Nuclear Energy, Special Issue on Multi-Physics Modelling of LWR Static and Transient Behavior, Invited paper, (2015).

Dr. Ashley C. BrownAshley C. Brown
Assistant Professor
Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering
Ph.D. (2011), Georgia Institute of Technology

Brown received her B.S. in biosystems engineering from Clemson University in 2006. She received a Ph.D. in bioengineering from Georgia Institute of Technology. She performed her postdoctoral studies at Georgia Institute of Technology in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering and was an American Heart Association Fellow. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, she was a research scientist in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Institute of Technology.

Brown’s current research interests include developing novel microgel-based materials for a variety of biomedical applications including augmentation of hemostasis, enhanced wound healing, evaluation and modulation of cellular mechanotransduction and development of biosynthetic constructs for regenerative medicine.

Research Interests

Biomaterials for enhanced wound healing, development of platelet-like particles to staunch bleeding and materials for investigating and controlling cell mechanotransduction responses

Selected Publications
  • Brown, A.C., Baker, S., Douglas, A., Keating, M., Alvarez, M., Botvinick, E., Guthold, M., Barker, T.H. Molecular interference of fibrin’s divalent polymerization mechanism enables modulation of multi-scale material properties. Biomaterials. 2015, 49, 27-36.
  • Brown, A.C., Stabenfeldt, S.E., Ahn, B., Hannan, R., Dhada, K., Herman, E., Stefanelli, V., Guzzetta, N., Alexeev, A., Lam, W.A., Lyon, L.A., Barker, T.H. Ultrasoft microgels displaying emergent platelet-like behaviours. Nature Materials. 2014, 13, 1108–1114.
  • Qui, Y., Brown, A.C., Myers, D.R., Sakurai, Y., Mannino, R., Tran, R., Ahn, B., Hardy, E., Kee, M., Kumar, S., Bao, G., Barker, T.H., Lam, W.A. Platelet mechanosensing of substrate stiffness during clot formation mediates adhesion, spreading and activation. PNAS. 2014, 111 (40), 14430-5.
  • Brown, A.C., Barker, T.H. Fibrin-based biomaterials: Modulation of macroscopic properties through rational design at the molecular level. Acta Biomater. 2013, 10, 1502-1514.

Bobby ComptonBobby Compton
Director
Electrical and Computer Engineering Design Center
MBA (2003), Duke University

Compton received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Virginia Tech. He obtained an MBA from Duke University, where he graduated as a Fuqua Scholar in the top 10 percent of the class. He has more than 20 years of industry experience in electronics design and embedded software design during his careers at GE Energy, GE Healthcare and Eaton Corporation. He has product design experience in diagnostic imaging equipment, biomedical sensors, industrial controls, motor drives and uninterruptible power supplies. He has been a design engineer, systems engineer, program manager, six sigma quality leader, global technology center manager and engineering general manager. He has led varied corporate research efforts involving: machine learning algorithms, biomedical devices, low noise analog design and renewable grid interface solutions. He has also led cross-functional business initiatives to resolve problems involving marketing, supply chain and manufacturing. At NC State he has been the chair of FREEDM’s Industry Advisory Board and a dissertation committee member for power electronics research. At Duke he has been a member of dissertation committees for electronic design automation research involving biomedical applications.

Currently, he is the director of NC State’s Electrical and Computer Engineering Design Center, which involves 200 senior undergraduate students doing 50 electronics design projects for industry sponsors and NC State faculty. He is also an adjunct instructor for a graduate level business consulting practicum course in the Masters of Engineering Management Program at Duke University.

Research Interests

Intuitive analysis and modeling techniques for analog electronics design, novel electronics design and systems engineering for biomedical devices and industrial applications

Selected Publications
  • McBryde,J., Kadavelugu, A.; Compton, B.; Bhattacharya, S.; Das, M.; Agarwal, A. Performance Comparison of 1200V Silicon and SiC devices for UPS Application – IECON 2010 – 36th Annual Conference on IEEE Industrial Electronics Society.

Dr. Michael DanieleMichael Daniele
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Joint NC State/UNC Department of Biomedical Engineering
Ph.D. (2012), Clemson University

Daniele received his B.S. in materials science and engineering from Rutgers University. He began his research in nanomaterials and biosensors at Clemson University, where he completed his graduate work in materials science and engineering (polymers). Daniele continued his research at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, sponsored by a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship. Prior to joining the faculty of NC State, he was a Jerome and Isabella Karle Distinguished Scholar at the Center for Bio/Molecular Science & Engineering (NRL), where he led a group studying composites for biosensors.

Daniele’s primary area of interest is the broad application of soft nanomaterials for the collective goal of understanding complex biological systems by engineering devices to monitor, mimic or augment biological function. He studies the synthesis, characterization and applications of biomaterials to integrate conventional electronics into biological systems to monitor or augment human performance. Alternatively, he explores the utilization of these same materials to regenerate native biological structures for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

Research Interests

Materials at the biological/electronic interface, electrochemical biosensors, biosynthesized polymers and composites, tissue engineering microfluidics and additive manufacturing

Selected Publications
  • M.A. Daniele, Adrian Knight, Steven Roberts, Kathryn Radom and Jeffrey Erickson. Polysaccharide Nanocomposite for Conformal Electronic Decals.” Advanced Materials. 27, 1600-1606 (2015).
  • M.A. Daniele, Kathryn Radom, Frances S. Ligler and Andre A. Adams. Microfluidic Fabrication of Multiaxial Microvessels via Hydrodynamic Focusing. RSC Advances. 4, 23440-23446 (2014).
  • M.A. Daniele, Andre A. Adams, Jawad Naciri, Stella H. North and Frances S. Ligler. Interpenetrating Networks Based on Gelatin Methacrylamide and PEG Formed Using Concurrent Thiol Click Chemistries for Hydrogel Tissue Engineering Scaffolds. Biomaterials. 35, 1845-1856 (2014).

Dr. Jason R. FranzJason R. Franz
Assistant Professor
Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering
Ph.D. (2012), University of Colorado, Boulder

Franz received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in engineering mechanics from Virginia Tech. He then served as a biomechanics engineer in the School of Medicine at the University of Virginia before earning his Ph.D. in integrative physiology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Before joining the Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, Franz served as an NIH post-doctoral fellow in the Neuromuscular Biomechanics Lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The overall goal of his research is to discover the age-related musculoskeletal and sensorimotor adaptations that underlie the loss of independent mobility in older adults and to introduce creative new approaches for preserving walking ability and preventing falls in our aging population. To accomplish this goal, Franz strategically integrates experimental and computational tools, including quantitative motion analysis, electromyography, biofeedback, virtual reality, tissue imaging and musculoskeletal modeling.

Research Interests

Biomechanics, physiology and neural control of human movement, a primary focus on the musculoskeletal and sensorimotor adaptations underlying the loss of independent mobility and increased risk of falls in our aging population

Selected Publications
  • Franz JR and Thelen DG. Depth-dependent variations in Achilles tendon deformations with age are associated with reduced plantarflexor performance during walking. Journal of Applied Physiology (in press).
  • Franz JR, Francis, CA, Allen MS, O’Connor SM, Thelen DG (2015). Advanced age brings a greater reliance on visual feedback to maintain balance during walking. Human Movement Science. 40: 381-92.
  • Franz JR, Slane LC, Rasske K, Thelen DG (2015). Non-uniform in vivo deformations of the human Achilles tendon during walking. Gait & Posture. 41(1): 192-7.
  • Franz JR, Maletis M, Kram R (2014). Real-time feedback enhances forward propulsion during walking in old adults. Clinical Biomechanics. 29(1): 68-74.
  • Franz JR, Lyddon NE, Kram R (2012). Mechanical work performed by the individual legs during uphill and downhill walking. Journal of Biomechanics. 45(2):257-62.

Dr. Donald O. FreytesDonald O. Freytes
Assistant Professor
Joint NC State/UNC Department of Biomedical Engineering
Ph.D. (2008), University of Pittsburgh

Freytes received his B.S. in mechanical engineering and M.S. in biomedical engineering from Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. in bioengineering from the University of Pittsburgh. After completing his graduate work, he received his postdoctoral training in the Laboratory for Stem Cell and Tissue Research at Columbia University. During his postdoctoral training, he received a Fellow-to-Faculty Award in Stem Cell Research from the New York State Department of Health (NYSTEM).

Prior to joining the NC State faculty, Freytes was a principal investigator at The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute, where he led a research group focusing on the development of in vitro platforms that mimic the inflammatory environment. His research currently centers on mimicking the host tissue response following a heart attack to design better cardiac patches. In addition, his research group derives tissue specific extracellular matrix biomaterials to guide stem cell differentiation toward specific tissue lineages.

Research Interests

Engineering cardiac tissues using pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, design of culture systems to study host tissue and engineered tissue interactions in vitro and design of alternate forms of extracellular matrix based biomaterials for tissue replacement

Selected Publications
  • Pallotta I, Sun B, Wrona EA, and Freytes DO. BMP Protein Mediated Cross-Talk between Inflammatory Cells and Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Cardiomyocytes. J Tissue Eng and Regen Med. (in press) (April 2015).
  • Freytes DO, Kang JW, Marcos-Campos I, Vunjak-Novakovic G. Macrophage Modulate the Viability and Growth of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. 2013 114(1):220-9.
  • Duan Y, Liu Z, O’Neill J, Wan LQ, Freytes DO, and Vunjak-Novakovic G. Hybrid Gel Composed of Native Heart Matrix and Collagen Induces Cardiac Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells without Supplemental Growth Factors. Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research. 2011 4(5):605-615.

Dr. Kenneth GranlundKenneth Granlund
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Ph.D. (2003), Virginia Tech

Granlund received his M.S. in vehicle engineering from the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden and a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from Virginia Tech. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was a research engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB in Ohio.

Presently, he studies the influence of streamwise velocity fluctuations on airfoils undergoing unsteady pitching and plunging. This is a natural extension of the “dynamic stall” problem and it applies mainly to helicopters and wind energy. Another topic is the theoretical concept of apparent mass and under what conditions it can be treated as a separate entity from circulatory force and off-body vortices.

Research Interests

Experimental fluid mechanics and vortex dynamics of unsteady motions leading to reduced-order models

Selected Publications
  • Granlund, K., Monnier, B. Ol, M. and Williams, D. Airfoil longitudinal gust response in separated vs. attached flows. Physics of Fluids 26(2), 027103, 2014.
  • Granlund, K., Ol, M. and Bernal, L. Free-to-Pivot Flat Plates in Hover for Reynolds Numbers 14 to 21,200. AIAA Journal, 2014.
  • Ramesh, K., Gopalarathnam, A., Edwards, J., Ol, M. and Granlund, K. An unsteady airfoil theory applied to pitching motions validated against experiment and computation. Journal of Theoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics. pp. 1-22, 2013.
  • Granlund, K., Ol, M. and Bernal, L. Unsteady Pitching Flat Plates. Journal of Fluid Mechanics. 733 R5, 2013.
  • Granlund, K., Ol, M. and Bernal, L. Experiments on free-to-pivot hover motions of flat plates. Journal of Fluids and Structures. 40, pp. 337-355, 2013.

Dr. Robert Bruce HayesRobert Bruce Hayes
Associate Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
Ph.D. (1999), University of Utah, Salt Lake City

Hayes received a B.S. in mathematics and physics in 1994 and an M.S. in physics in 1997 from the University of Utah. In 1999, he received his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of Utah. He is a Certified Health Physicist (CHP) by the American Board of Health Physics and a Licensed Professional Engineer (PE) in nuclear engineering in both the state of New Mexico and the state of Nevada. His major honors and awards include: Fellow of the American Physical Society (2011) through the Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics, Hoover-Newton award (2010) from the Health Physics Society’s Air Monitoring Users Group and National Service Recognition Award (2012) from the American Nuclear Society’s Radiation Protection and Shielding Division.

Additionally, he is a member of the Professional Engineering Exam Writing Group for NCEES in Nuclear Engineering, research affiliate in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Physics Department’s Laboratory for Nuclear Science, chair of the ANSI Standard Writing Committee for ANSI 42.54 on Radiological Air monitoring and experienced user of MCNP for both radiation shielding and nuclear criticality safety calculations.

Research Interests

Nuclear security and nonproliferation

Selected Publications
  • Hayes R. B. (2013). Nuclear criticality as a contributor to gamma ray burst events. Astrophys. Space Sci. 345, 147-154.
  • Hayes R. B. Nuclear science and technology made so simple, it belongs in your newspaper – popular science topics for the layman. ASIN: B00CC2KB5S [Kindle Edition]. April 7, 2013.
  • Hayes R. B Akbarzadeh M. (2014). Using isotopic ratios for discrimination of environmental anthropogenic radioactivity. Health Phys. 107, 277-291.
  • Hayes R. B. (2009). Preliminary Benchmarking Efforts and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security. Nuclear Technology. 168, 852-857.
  • Hayes R. B. (2009). Continuous Air Monitor Algorithm Development. Nuclear Technology. 168, 35-40.
  • Hayes R. B. (2008). High burn-up capability possibilities for a new beryllium moderated water cooled natural uranium reactor. Annals of Nuclear Energy. 35, 1584-1586.

Dr. Xiaogang Hu

Xiaogang Hu
Assistant Professor
Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering
Ph.D. (2011), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park

Hu received his B.E. in mechanical engineering from Tsinghua University in China. He then received a Ph.D. degree in kinesiology with a focus on neural control of muscle force and a minor in computational science in the Department of Aerospace Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Prior to joining NC State, he was a research scientist at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and research assistant professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Northwestern University.

His research interests focus on the control characteristics and neuromechanical properties of the upper extremity in individuals with neuromuscular injuries such as stroke or amputations. He also develops innovative techniques involving electrophysiological recordings, signal processing, tissue imaging and computational modeling in order to understand and improve the control and coordination patterns of the upper extremity, with the goal of maximizing research translation to clinical practice and functional recovery of disabled individuals.

Research Interests

Neurophysiology, biomechanics, motor control and learning, computational science, neural engineering, neurorehabilitation and motor disorder

Selected Publications
  • Hu, X, Suresh, N. L., & Rymer, W. Z. (2015). Estimating the time course of population excitatory postsynaptic potentials in motoneurons of spastic stroke survivors. Journal of Neurophysiology. 113(6), 1952-1957.
  • Hu, X., Suresh, N. L., Chardon, M. K., & Rymer, W. Z. (2014). Contributions of motoneuron hyperexcitability to clinical spasticity in hemispheric stroke survivors. Clinical Neurophysiology. S1388-2457
  • Hu, X., Rymer, W. Z., & Suresh, N. L. (2014). Motor unit firing rate patterns during voluntary muscle force generation: a simulation study. Journal of Neural Engineering. 11(2), 026015.
  • Hu, X., Rymer, W. Z., & Suresh, N. L. (2013). Motor unit pool organization examined via spike triggered averaging of the surface electromyogram. Journal of Neurophysiology. 110(5), 1205-1220.

Dr. Kostadin IvanovKostadin Ivanov
Professor and Head
Department of Nuclear Engineering
Ph.D. (1990), Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria

Ivanov received a B.S. in nuclear engineering from the Moscow Institute of Power Engineering, Russia. He received his Ph.D. in reactor physics from the Institute of Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. He was senior research scientist at INRNE and assistant professor at the Technical University of Sofia, Bulgaria. Later, he was a visiting Fulbright scholar at the Nuclear Engineering Department, Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and visiting scientist at the Research Center Rossendorf Inc., Germany. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was a distinguished professor of nuclear engineering and graduate coordinator of nuclear engineering program at PSU.

Presently he studies the next generation stochastic and deterministic methods in reactor physics analysis and also nuclear cross-section generation and modeling. Ivanov also develops advanced methods for multi-physics coupling for design and safety applications. Another topic is the study of verification and validation methods as well as uncertainty quantification and propagation in modeling and simulations.

Research Interests

Nuclear reactor physics and multi-physics, nuclear core design and safety analysis, nuclear plant simulations, validation and verification of multi-physics calculations, uncertainty quantification and propagation in modeling

Selected Publications
  • Avramova, M. and Ivanov, K. & et al. Multi-Physics and Multi-Scale Benchmarking and Uncertainty Quantification within NEA/OECD Framework. Annals of Nuclear Energy. 2015, 84, 178-196.
  • Ivanov, A., Sanchez, V., Stieglitz, R., & Ivanov, K. Large-scale Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Calculations with Thermal-Hydraulic Feedback. Annals of Nuclear Energy. 2015, 84, 204-219.
  • Bratton, R., Avramova, M., Ivanov, K. Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) for LWRs – Summary and Discussion of Neutronics Cases (Phase I). Nuclear Engineering and Technology (NET). 2014, Vol. 46 No.3, 313-349.

Dr. Alexandros KapravelosAlexandros Kapravelos
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
Ph.D. (2015), University of California, Santa Barbara

Kapravelos received his B.S. and M.S. in computer science from University of Crete. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from University of California, Santa Barbara in 2015. He is the lead developer of Wepawet, a publicly available system that detects drive-by downloads with the use of an emulated browser, and Revolver, a system that detects evasive drive-by download attempts. Currently, he studies how the web changes on the client side via browser extensions and how we can protect the browser from malicious client-side attacks. He is also interested in Internet privacy and browser fingerprinting specifically, where he is working on making Internet users less distinctive while they browse the web.

Research Interests

Span the areas of systems and software security, in particular: protecting the browser at all levels, from designing a secure browser architecture to measuring and understanding large-scale Internet attacks and understanding how the web works and evolves over time and how it can be made more secure for the users

Selected Publications
  • Kurt Thomas, Elie Bursztein, Chris Grier, Grant Ho, Nav Jagpal, Alexandros Kapravelos, Damon McCoy, Antonio Nappa, Vern Paxson, Paul Pearce, Niels Provos, Moheeb Abu Rajab. Ad Injection at Scale: Assessing Deceptive Advertisement Modifications. IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. 2015.
  • Alexandros Kapravelos, Chris Grier, Neha Chachra, Chris Kruegel, Giovanni Vigna, and Vern Paxson. Hulk: Eliciting Malicious Behavior in Browser Extensions. USENIX Security. 2014.
  • Alexandros Kapravelos, Yan Shoshitaishvili, Marco Cova, Christopher Kruegel, and Giovanni Vigna. Revolver: An Automated Approach to the Detection of Evasive Web-based Malware. USENIX Security. 2013.
  • Nick Nikiforakis, Alexandros Kapravelos, Wouter Joosen, Christopher Kruegel, Frank Piessens, and Giovanni Vigna. Cookieless Monster: Exploring the Ecosystem of Web-based Device Fingerprinting. IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (S&P). 2013.
  • Alexandros Kapravelos, Marco Cova, Christopher Kruegel, and Giovanni Vigna. Escape from Monkey Island: Evading High-Interaction Honeyclients. 8th Conference on Detection of Intrusions and Malware & Vulnerability Assessment (DIMVA). 2011.

Dr. Albert KeungAlbert Keung
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Ph.D. (2012), University of California, Berkeley

Keung received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He was a postdoctoral researcher in the Institute for Medical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Department at MIT and Boston University, respectively.

Presently, the Keung lab develops synthetic biology systems for bioproduction applications in yeast and regenerative medicine applications in human cells. In particular, the lab uses synthetic biology approaches to understand and harness the dynamic biophysical and biochemical structure of chromatin to better control the expression of genes and sets of genes. The Keung lab also studies the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense, respond to and store mechanical information from the microenvironment. The lab uses a mixture of experimental and computational techniques from molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics and engineering.

Research Interests

Synthetic and systems biology of eukaryotic regulatory systems, stem cell engineering and regenerative medicine, epigenome engineering for biotechnology and biomedical research

Selected Publications
  • Keung, A. J., Joung, J. K., Khalil, A. S., Collins, J. J. (2015). Chromatin regulation at the frontier of eukaryotic synthetic biology. Nature Reviews Genetics. 16, 159-171.
  • Keung, A. J., Bashor, C. B., Kiriakov, S., Collins, J. J., Khalil, A. S. (2014). Using Targeted Chromatin Regulators to Engineer Combinatorial and Spatial Transcriptional Regulation. Cell. 158, 110-120.
  • Keung, A. J., Asuri, P., Kumar, S., Schaffer, D. V. (2012). Soft Substrates Promote the Early Neurogenic Differentiation but not Self-Renewal of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells. Integrative Biology. 4, 1049-1058.
  • Keung, A. J., de Juan Pardo, E., Kumar, S., Schaffer, D. V. (2011). Rho GTPases Mediate the Mechanosensitive Lineage Commitment of Neural Stem Cells. Stem Cells. 29, 1886-1897.
  • Keung, A. J., Kumar, S., Schaffer, D. V. (2010). Presentation Counts: Microenvironmental Regulation of Stem Cells by Biophysical and Material Cues. Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology. 26, 533-556.

Dr. Jun LiuJun Liu
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Ph.D. (2013), University of Colorado, Boulder

Liu received his B.S. in energy and power engineering from Huazhong University of Science and Technology. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from University of Colorado at Boulder. He was a postdoctoral research associate in materials science and engineering at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Liu’s specialty focuses on both experimental and theoretical/numerical investigations of thermal properties of micro/nano-structured materials for applications in energy harvesting and conversion. In working toward solutions for the global energy challenge, his future research will consist of two parts: (1) developing numerical/theoretical and experimental tools/platforms for understanding nanoscale thermal transport and probing new thermal transport phenomena in micro/nanoscale structures; (2) establishing novel functional thermal materials as elementary building blocks for thermal management and energy conversion/storage devices and systems with enhanced performance.

Research Interests

Nanoscale heat transfer, energy conversion and management, thermal transport in soft matters and hybrid materials, ultrafast-laser based characterization of materials and bioheat transfer

Selected Publications
  • Jun Liu, Xiaojia Wang, Dongyao Li, Nelson E. Coates, Rachel A. Segalman, and David G. Cahill, Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Constants of PEDOT:PSS with High Electrical Conductivity. Macromolecules. 48, 585 (2015).
  • Jun Liu, Gyung-Min Choi, and David G. Cahill, Measurement of the Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Molybdenum Disulfide Single Crystal by the Time-resolved Magneto-optical Kerr Effect. Journal of Applied Physics. 116, 233107(2014).
  • Jun Liu, Byunghoon Yoon, Eli Kuhlmann, Miao Tian, Jie Zhu, Steven M. George, Yung-Cheng Lee, and Ronggui Yang, Ultralow Thermal Conductivity of Atomic/Molecular Layer Deposited Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Zincone Thin Films. Nano Letters. 13,5594 (2013).
  • Jun Liu and Ronggui Yang, Length-dependent Thermal Conductivity of Single Extended Polymer Chains. Physical Review B. 86, 104307 (2012).
  • Jun Liu and Ronggui Yang, Tuning the Thermal Conductivity of Polymers with Mechanical Strains. Physical Review B. 81, 174122 (2010).

Dr. Stefano MenegattiStefano Menegatti
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Ph.D. (2013), North Carolina State University

Menegatti earned his Ph.D. at NC State University in chemical and biomolecular engineering with a minor in biotechnology. His doctoral work was focused on the development of peptide-based affinity ligands for the purification of biotherapeutics and the design of novel and inexpensive in vivo and in vitro diagnostics. His dissertation set forth novel methods for the design and selection of cyclic and polycyclic peptide ligands.

As a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Menegatti worked on developing novel strategies for targeted drug delivery. His research projects included nanoparticle platelet mimetics, targeted delivery of multi-drug combinations with synergistic anticancer activity and transdermal delivery with skin-penetrating peptides.

Research Interests

Stimuli-responsive (pH, temperature, electromagnetic) ligands for purification of protein therapeutics and stem cells; drug delivery through the “difficult” body barriers (skin, eye sclera, blood brain barrier, synovial membranes) hydrogels and micro-/nano-particles for light-controlled release of small drugs

Selected Publications
  • Stefano Menegatti, Kevin L. Ward, Amith D. Naik, William S. Kish, Robert K. Blackburn, and Ruben G. Carbonell. Reversible cyclic peptide libraries for the discovery of affinity ligands. Anal. Chem. 2013, 85(19), 9229-9237.
  • Stefano Menegatti, Mahmud Hussain, Amith D. Naik, Balaji M. Rao, and Ruben G. Carbonell. mRNA display selection and solid-phase synthesis of Fc-binding cyclic peptide affinity ligands. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2012, 110(3), 857-870.
  • Stefano Menegatti, Amith D. Naik, and Ruben G. Carbonell. The hidden potential of small synthetic molecules and peptides as affinity ligands for bioseparation. Pharm. Bioprocessing 2013, 1(5), 467-485.
  • Stefano Menegatti, Nino Ruocco, Sunny Kumar, Michael Zakrewsky, Joshua Sanchez De Oliveira, M. E. Helgeson, L. Gary Leal and Samir Mitragotri. Synthesis and characterization of a self-fluorescent hyaluronic acid-based gel for subcutaneous applications. Paper accepted by Advanced Functional Materials (2015).

Dr. Fernando Garcia MenendezFernando Garcia Menendez
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
Ph.D. (2013), Georgia Institute of Technology

Menendez received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM) and a M.S. in civil and environmental engineering from Stanford University. He completed his Ph.D. in environmental engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Prior to joining NC State, he was a postdoctoral associate in the Center for Global Change Science and Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Menendez has also spent time working in industry and environmental advocacy.

Menendez uses computational models to explore the connections between air pollution, climate change, energy use and public health. His research is based on numerical and computational methods, uncertainty analysis and integrated assessment modeling to explore interdisciplinary questions related to atmospheric chemistry. Current research interests include the impact of climate uncertainty on air quality projections and simulating the effect of forest fires on atmospheric pollution. As a faculty member, he will develop a modeling laboratory that can bridge the large range of spatial and temporal scales at which interactions between air pollution and environmental and human systems occur.

Research Interests

Air quality, environmental modeling, climate-chemistry interactions, numerical methods and high performance computing

Selected Publications
  • Garcia-Menendez, F., Saari, R. K., Monier, E., and Selin, N. E. (2015). US air quality and health benefits from avoided climate change under greenhouse gas mitigation. Environmental Science & Technology. 49 (13), 7580-7588.
  • Garcia-Menendez, F., Yano, A., Hu, Y., and Odman, M. T. (2014). Simulating smoke transport from wildland fires with a regional-scale air quality model: Sensitivity to spatiotemporal allocation of fire emissions. Science of the Total Environment. 493, 544-553.
  • Garcia-Menendez, F., Yano, A., Hu, Y., and Odman, M. T. (2013). Simulating smoke transport from wildland fires with a regional-scale air quality model: Sensitivity to uncertain wind fields. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. 118 (12), 6493-6504.

Dr. Adriana San-MiguelAdriana San-Miguel
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Ph.D. (2011), Georgia Institute of Technology

San-Miguel received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM) in 2005. After spending two years working in industry, she moved to the United States to pursue a graduate degree. She obtained a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2011. As a member of the Behrens Research Group, she worked on the development of microcapsules and stimulus-responsive systems. Motivated by a growing interest in biology, she turned her research efforts to engineering solutions for biological studies. Prior to joining NC State, she worked as a postdoctoral fellow in Professor Hang Lu’s group at Georgia Tech. She also held an appointment as a research fellow with Professor Marc Vidal at the Center for Cancer Systems Biology (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School). In 2013, she was awarded an NIH K99 Pathway to Independence Award from the National Institute of Aging to study the mechanisms regulating synaptic plasticity and aging in the nematode C. elegans.

Currently, she works with the well-studied nematode C. elegans, a simple multicellular model organism useful for studies ranging from development to neuroscience and aging. Her expertise is focused on developing experimental platforms that enable high-throughput automated extraction of biological data, mainly from images of subcellular biological features in a live organism. These platforms are made possible by combining microfluidics, automation, custom designed external hardware and image processing. In this way, it is possible to obtain large multivariate data sets in an unbiased manner, enabling experimentation and understanding of biological phenomena from a systems perspective.

Research Interests

Systems biology, high-throughput biological data acquisition, microfluidics, unsupervised image analysis, neuroscience and aging

Selected Publications
  • C. Maeder, A. San-Miguel, E. Wu, H. Lu, K. Shen. In vivo neuron-wide microscopy reveals differential regulation of synaptic vesicle precursor trafficking. Traffic. 2014, 15(3), 273-91.

Dr. Muhammad ShahzadMuhammad Shahzad
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
Ph.D. (2015), Michigan State University

Shahzad received his Ph.D. in computer science from Michigan State University in May 2015. During his Ph.D., Shahzad did two internships at Microsoft Research, Redmond, WA, and one at Technicolor Research, Paris, France.

His research interests lie in the probabilistic network measurements of both wired as well as wireless networks. For wired networks, his work focuses on the modeling, design and analysis of probabilistic protocols to measure fundamental network performance metrics such as latency, jitter, throughput and packet loss. For wireless networks, his work focuses on modeling, design and analysis of probabilistic measurement protocols for radio frequency identification (RFID) systems, which arguably are the key enablers of communication in the emerging infrastructures of Internet-of-Things. Shahzad is interested in exploring new sensing modalities for human activity and gesture recognition.

He is the recipient of the 2015 Fitch Beach Graduate Research Award, 2015 Outstanding Graduate Student Award and 2012 Outstanding Student Leader Award at Michigan State University. Shahzad has served on the program committees of IEEE ICNP 2014, ICCCN 2014, and ACM MobiCom S3 Workshop 2014. He has also served as EDAS chair for IEEE ICNP 2014 and proceedings chair for IEEE MASCOTS 2015.

Research Interests

Probabilistic network measurements of wired and wireless networks by modeling, design and analysis of probabilistic and measurement protocols; new sensing modalities for human activity and gesture recognition

Selected Publications
  • Muhammad Shahzad and Alex X. Liu. Expecting the Unexpected: Fast and Reliable Detection of Missing RFID Tags in the Wild. Proceedings of the 34rd Annual IEEE International Conference on Computer Communications (INFOCOM). Hong Kong, China, April, 2015.
  • Muhammad Shahzad and Alex X. Liu. Noise Can Help: Accurate and Efficient Per-flow Latency Measurement without Packet Probing and Time Stamping. Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Measurement and Modeling of Computer Systems (SIGMETRICS). Pages 207-219. Austin, Texas, June 2014.

Dr. Franky SoFranky So
Walter and Ida Freeman Distinguished Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Ph.D. (1991), University of Southern California

So received his B.A. degree in physics from Hamilton College, his M.S. degree in materials science from MIT and his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California. He started his career as a research scientist at Hoechst Celanese and Motorola Corporate Research Laboratories. While at Motorola, he was instrumental to commercialization of the world’s first organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays used in mobile phones in 2000. He later became the head of OLED Research at OSRAM Opto Semiconductors. In 2005, he joined the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Florida and later became the Rolf E. Hummel Professor of Electronic Materials. He is a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers (IEEE), Optical Society of America (OSA) and International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE).

His research interest is in the area of organic and nanocrystal materials for optoelectronic device applications. He is currently studying the morphological, dielectric and interfacial effects on the properties of polymeric solar cells. So is also investigating the use of corrugated substrates to enhance the light extraction efficiency of OLEDs.

Research Interests

Organic and molecular electronic materials and devices, small molecular organic materials, conjugated polymers and organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials, quantum dots, carrier transport, photophysics and optoelectronic devices such as light emitting devices, solar cells, novel transistors and optical sensors

Selected Publications
  • Dewei Zhao, M. Sexton, Hye-yun Park, Do Young Kim, George Braue, Juan C. Nino, and Franky So. High efficiency solution processed planar perovskite solar cells with a polymer hole transport layer. Adv. Energy Mater. 5, 1401855 (2015).
  • Song Chen, Sai-Wing Tsang, Tzung-Han Lai, John R. Reynolds, and Franky So. Dielectric effect on the photovoltage loss in organic photovoltage cells. Adv. Mater. 26, 6125 (2014).
  • Do Young Kim, Tzung-Han Lai, Jae Woong Lee, Franky So. Multi-spectral imaging with infrared sensitive OLEDs. Scientific Reports 5, 5946 (2014).

Dr. Jessica StaddonJessica Staddon
Associate Professor and Director of Privacy
Department of Computer Science
Ph.D. (1997), University of California, Berkeley

Staddon holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from U. C. Berkeley. She is joining the Department of Computer Science as an associate professor and director of privacy. Previously she was a research scientist and manager at Google, an area manager at Xerox PARC and a research scientist at Bell Labs and RSA Labs.

Her interests include usable security and privacy tools, trends in privacy-related attitudes and methods for measuring and predicting privacy-related behaviors, attitudes and risks. She serves regularly on the program committees of ACM and IEEE sponsored security/privacy conferences and is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Computer Security and the International Journal of Information and Computer Security and the advisory board of the Association for Women in Mathematics.

Research Interests

Privacy, user experience, data mining, security and policy

Selected Publications
  • J. Staddon, D. Huffaker, L. Brown and A. Sedley. Are privacy concerns a turn-off? Engagement and privacy in social networks. SOUPS. 2012.
  • J. Staddon, A. Acquisti and K. LeFevre. Self-reported social network behavior: Accuracy predictors and implications for the privacy paradox. SocialCom. 2013.
  • E. Bier, R. Chow, P. Golle , T. King and J. Staddon. The rules of redaction: identify, protect, review (and repeat). IEEE Security & Privacy. 2009.
  • R. Johnson and J. Staddon. Deflation-secure Web metering. International Journal of Information and Computer Security. Volume 1, 2007.

Dr. Pramod SubbareddyPramod Subbareddy
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Ph.D. (2007), University of Minnesota

Subbareddy received a BTech in aerospace engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras and a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Minnesota. Prior to joining NC State, he was a research associate at the University of Minnesota.

His interests are in the simulation and analysis of transitional and turbulent high speed flows. Currently, he is involved in projects that involve the construction of high-fidelity tools for the efficient solution of these problems and in work that uses these tools to study a wide range of flowfields.

Research Interests

Fluid mechanics, computational fluid dynamics, turbulence, transition and numerical methods

Selected Publications
  • Subbareddy, P.K., Bartkowicz, M. D., & Candler, G. V. (2014). Direct numerical simulation of high-speed transition due to an isolated roughness element. Journal of Fluid Mechanics. Vol. 748.
  • Candler, G. V., Subbareddy, P. K., & Nompelis, I. 2015, CFD Methods for Hypersonic Flows and Aerothermodynamics. Hypersonic Nonequilibrium Flows: Fundamentals and Recent Advances (Book Chapter).
  • Brock, J., Subbareddy, P. K., & Candler, G. V. (2015). Detached-Eddy simulations of hypersonic capsule wake flow. AIAA Journal. Vol. 53.
  • Candler, G. V., Subbareddy, P. K., & Nompelis, I. (2013). A decoupled implicit method for aerothermodynamics and reacting flows. AIAA Journal. Vol. 51.
  • Subbareddy, P. K., & Candler, G. V. (2009). A fully discrete, kinetic energy consistent finite-volume scheme for compressible flows. Journal of Computational Physics. Vol. 228.

Dr. Shumin WangShumin Wang
Assistant Professor
Joint NC State/UNC Department of Biomedical Engineering
Ph.D. (2003), Ohio State University

Wang received his B.S. in applied physics from Qingdao University, China. He received his M.S. in electrophysics from Beijing University, China and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Ohio State University. He was a staff scientist at the National Institutes of Health. Prior to joining NC State, he was an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Auburn University.

Presently, his studies mainly focus on hardware for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra-high field strengths. Wang also studied the compatibility of medical devices and implants with MRI scanner. Another topic is advanced electromagnetic simulation techniques for either subject-specific or cross-subject MRI safety.

Research Interests

Magnetic resonance imaging hardware development and applications, MRI compatibility of medical devices, brain stimulation devices and safety and electromagnetic simulation of medical devices

Selected Publications
  • Yu Shao, Shuo Shang and Shumin Wang. On Local SAR Simulated by Using Simplified Human Models. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Vol. 33, Issue 6, p779–786, 2015.
  • Shizhe Li, Li An, Shao Yu, Maria Ferraris Araneta, Christopher S. Johnson, Shumin Wang and Jun Shen. 13C MRS of Human Brain at 7 Tesla Using [2-13C] Glucose Infusion and Low Power Stochastic Proton Decoupling. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. DOI: 10.1002/mrm.25721, 2015.
  • Yu Shao, Peng Zeng and Shumin Wang. Statistical simulation of SAR variability with geometric and tissue property changes by using the unscented transform. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. Vol. 73, issue 6, pp. 2357-2362, 2015.
  • Hai Lu, Shuo Shang and Shumin Wang. Parallel-Plate Waveguide for Volume Radio Frequency Transmission in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. DOI: 10.1002/mrm.25517, 2014.
  • Shumin Wang, Yu Shao and Shizhe Li. Rapid Local Specific Absorption Rate Estimation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. IEEE Transaction on Electromagnetic Compatibility. Vol. 56, issue 4, pp. 771-779, 2014.

Year 2014-15

Dr. Alex AlbertAlex Albert
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2013), University of Colorado, Boulder

Albert earned his PhD in civil engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2013. He also received an MS in structural engineering from Lehigh University in 2010. His primary research expertise is in the area of construction safety with a particular focus on hazard recognition, risk quantification, situational awareness, injury prevention, design-for-safety, and experimental research on construction projects.

His research work has been published in the ASCE Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Construction Management and Economics, Safety Science, the ASSE Journal of Safety Health and Environmental Research and other publications. He received the best paper award from the International Council for Research and Innovation in Building and Construction in 2012, the American Society for Engineering Education in 2013 and the 2nd best paper award at the Construction Research Congress in 2014. He has actively been involved in research funded by the Construction Industry Institute, ELECTRI International, the National Science Foundation and private companies.

Research Interests

Construction safety and health, hazard recognition and management, situational awareness, injury prevention, construction hazards prevention through design (CHPtD), and experimental research

Selected Publications
  • Albert, A., Hallowell, M.R., Kleiner, B.M., Chen, A., and Golparvar-Fard, M. (2014) “Enhancing construction hazard recognition with high fidelity augmented virtuality,” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, ASCE, 140(7), 04014024.
  • Albert, A., Hallowell, M.R., and Kleiner, B.M. (2014) “Enhancing construction hazard recognition and communication with energy-based cognitive mnemonics and safety meeting maturity model: A multiple baseline study.” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, ASCE, 140(2), 04013042.
  • Albert, A., and Hallowell, M.R. (2013) “Safety risk assessment for transmission and distribution line work.” Safety Science, 51(1), 118-126.

Dr. Mike BordenMike Borden
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2012), The University of Texas at Austin

Borden received an MS in computational and applied mathematics, as well as a PhD from the Computational Science, Engineering, and Mathematics program from The University of Texas at Austin. His doctoral research focused on developing computational methods at the intersection of computational geometry and engineering analysis that enable more efficient simulation of complex material and structural processes. His research provided methods that facilitate the transfer of computer-aided design descriptions to analysis software. He also developed numerical tools for the prediction of failure modes in complex 3D structures.

Borden spent five years working as a computational scientist at Sandia National Laboratories before beginning his PhD. As a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin, Borden was focused on developing predictive tools for material and structural failure. He plans to continue exploring computational methods and technologies that unite analysis and design.

Borden holds an MS in civil engineering and a BS in civil and environmental engineering, both from Brigham Young University.

Research Interests

Computational fracture and damage mechanics, computational mechanics of materials, isogeometric analysis based on NURBS and T-splines, and scientific and high-performance computing

Selected Publications
  • M. J. Borden, T. J. R. Hughes, C. M. Landis, and C. V. Verhoosel. “A higher-order phase-field model for brittle fracture: Formulation and analysis within the isogeometric analysis framework.” Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 273:100–118, 2014.
  • Z. A. Wilson, M. J. Borden, and C. M. Landis. “A phase-field model for fracture in piezoelectric ceramics.” International Journal of Fracture, 183(2):135–153, 2013.
  • M. J. Borden, C. V. Verhoosel, M. A. Scott, T. J. R. Hughes, and C. M. Landis. “A phase-field description of dynamic brittle fracture.” Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 217-220:77–95, 2012.

Marshall BrainMarshall Brain
Director
Engineering Entrepreneurs Program
MS (1986), NC State University

Brain serves as part of NC State’s Entrepreneurship Initiative team and has been director of the Engineering Entrepreneurs Program since 2012. He coordinates the teaching, resources and support that enable students to develop working prototypes and business plans for their innovations.

He is most widely known as the founder of HowStuffWorks.com, an award-winning website that offers clear, objective and easy-to-understand explanations of how the world around us actually works. The site, which he created as a hobby in 1998 and took through several rounds of venture funding totaling approximately $8 million, was purchased for $250 million by Discovery Communications in 2007.

Brain has been featured on everything from CNN and Good Morning Americato The Oprah Winfrey Show. In 2008 and 2009, he was the host of the National Geographic channel’s Factory Floor With Marshall Brain, a series of one-hour factory tours taking the viewer on a journey into the world of product design, engineering and manufacturing.

Brain is the author of more than a dozen books as well as a number of widely known Web publications including How to Make a Million Dollars, Robotic Nation, Manna, and The Teenager’s Guide to the Real World. He frequently works with students at all levels to help them understand science and technology topics, entrepreneurship and how the world works.

He holds an MS in computer science from NC State and was named a Distinguished Engineering Alumnus in 2011.

Selected Publications
  • Manna: Two Visions of Humanity’s Future, BYG Publishing (March 2012)
  • The Meaning of Life, BYG Publishing (March 2012)
  • EcoPRT.com – Revolutionary Transportation system for NCSU
  • Marshall Brain’s How Stuff Works, John Wiley & Sons (September 2001)
  • Marshall Brain’s MORE How STUFF Works, John Wiley & Sons (October 2002)

Doug CallDoug Call
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2011), Penn State University

Call obtained a BS in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia in 2003 and a second BS in civil engineering from Virginia Tech in 2005. He received both his MS and PhD in environmental engineering from Penn State University in 2008 and 2011, respectively.

Prior to joining the NC State faculty, Call was an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Syracuse University. His research interests lie at the intersection of water and energy. More specifically, he studies technologies that extract energy from unconventional water sources, such as wastewater and salinity gradients. Call focuses on a suite of hybrid biological-electrochemical technologies that recover valuable resources, such as energy, biogas and nutrients from wastewater. To advance these systems, he relies on experimentation using molecular, microbiological and electrochemical techniques.

Research Interests

Resource (energy, nutrients, water) recovery from wastewater, environmental microbiology, microbial fuel cell technologies, water-energy nexus and sustainable sanitation

Selected Publications
  • Call, D. F.; Logan, B. E. Lactate oxidation coupled to iron or electrode reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 2011, 77(24), 8791-8794.
  • Call, D. F.; Logan, B. E. A method for high throughput bioelectrochemical research based on small scale microbial electrolysis cells. Biosens. Bioelec.2011, 26(11), 4526-4531.
  • Call, D. F.; Wagner, R. C.; Logan, B. E. Hydrogen production by Geobacter species and a mixed consortium in a microbial electrolysis cell. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 2009, 75(24), 7579-7587.
  • Call, D. F.; Merrill, M. D.; Logan, B. E. High surface area stainless steel brushes as cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells. Environ. Sci. Technol.2009, 43(6), 2179-2183.
  • Call, D. F.; Logan, B. E. Hydrogen production in a single chamber microbial electrolysis cell lacking a membrane. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42(9), 3401-3406.

Dr. Matthew FisherMatthew Fisher
Assistant Professor
Joint NC State-UNC Department of Biomedical Engineering
PhD (2010), University of Pittsburgh

Fisher received his BS in biomedical engineering from Columbia University, followed by a PhD in bioengineering from the University of Pittsburgh. Before joining the faculty at NC State, Fisher completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He joined NC State in January 2014 as a Chancellor’s Faculty Excellence Program cluster hire in translational regenerative medicine.

Fisher’s long-term research goal is to utilize quantitative metrics and engineering principles to understand why individual tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches succeed within the body and employ this knowledge to develop superior technologies, with a strong focus on musculoskeletal soft tissues. Specific areas of interest include bioscaffolds, prediction of outcomes following implantation, and assessment of function following treatment. Fisher will work closely with his colleagues within the regenerative medicine cluster to develop and evaluate functional and scaleable scaffolds for enhanced tissue regeneration.

Research Interests

Regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, orthopaedic soft tissues, bioscaffolds and robotics

Selected Publications
  • Fisher, M.B., Henning E.A., Söegaard N.B., Dodge G.R., Steinberg D.R., Mauck R.L. Maximizing Cartilage Formation and Integration via a Novel Trajectory-based Tissue Engineering Approach. Biomaterials, 35: 2140-2148, 2014.
  • Fisher, M.B., Henning, E.A, Söegaard, N., Esterhai, J.L., Mauck, R.L. Organized Nanofibrous Scaffolds That Mimic the Macroscopic and Microscopic Architecture of the Knee Meniscus. Acta Biomaterialia, 9(1): 4496-4504, 2013.
  • Fisher, M.B., Woo, S.L-Y., Zamarra, G., Jung, H-J., Almarza, A.J., Liang, R., and McMahon, P.J. Potential of Healing a Transected Anterior Cruciate Ligament with Genetically-Modified Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffolds in a Goat Model. 1, 20: 1357-1365, 2012.
  • Fisher, M.B. and Mauck, R.L. Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine: Recent Innovations and the Transition to Translation. Tissue Engineering: Part B, 19(1):1-13, 2013.

Dr. Ericka FordEricka Ford
Assistant Professor
Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science; The Nonwovens Institute
PhD (2012), Georgia Institute of Technology

Ford holds undergraduate and doctoral degrees in polymer, textiles and fiber engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She received an MS in polymer science from the University of Southern Mississippi. As a graduate student, Ford participated in two NSF-supported IGERTs for integrated graduate education and research training, wherein she studied the commercialization of polymers and fiber technologies. Prior to joining the faculty at NC State, she served as a National Research Council postdoctoral awardee in Chemical and Biological Defense, Science and Technology at the US Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center.

In the interest of developing high-performance textiles and fibers, Ford will employ the use of nanotechnology. Carbon nanotubes are examples of filler particles, having dimensions on the scale of 10-9 m. In consequence to their small size and ability to interact with other molecules, they can be used to strengthen polymeric fibers through structural reinforcement and to create smart multi-component textiles.

Research Interests

Engineering of nanofiller-polymer interphases to develop functional, high-performance fibers; autonomous protection and drug release from multicomponent fibers; sustainable coatings and polymer technologies; and partnerships in support of science, technology, engineering and mathematics education

Selected Publications
  • E Ford, N Suthiwangcharoen, P D’Angelo, R Nagarajan, “Role of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Ester Hydrolysis and Topography of Electrospun Bovine Serum Albumin/Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Membranes,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 6 (2014) 11741-11748.
  • E N J Ford, Y V Gilbert, “Displacement Between Orders of Magnitude Method for SI Unit Conversion,” (Communication) Journal of Chemical Education, 90 (2013) 134–136.
  • E Ford, M L Minus, T Liu, J I Choi, S S Jang, S Kumar, “Influence of SWNTs on the Preferential Alignment of Molecular Moieties in PVA Fibers,” Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics, 213 (2012) 617-626.

Dr. Wei GaoWei Gao
Assistant Professor
Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science
PhD (2012), Rice University

Gao earned her BS and MS in chemistry and analytical chemistry from Nanjing University in China, working on inverse-opal metal structures for electrooxidation in direct methanol fuel cells, as well as for electrochemiluminescence sensing in biological systems. She then started her PhD program working on graphene materials in Professor Pulickel M. Ajayan’s group at Rice University, where she earned her PhD in chemistry in 2012. She was named a Director’s Postdoctoral Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory the same year, where she worked on hydrogen-air fuel cells and supercapacitors with Dr. Andrew Dattelbaum, an NC State alumnus, and Dr. Piotr Zelenay for more than two years.

Gao’s research interests lie at the interface between nanomaterials science and energy-related technologies, such as batteries, supercapacitors and fuel cells. She has extensive knowledge and experience in carbon nanomaterial synthesis, modification and characterizations, such as graphene, graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes, as well as device design and fabrication expertise.

Research Interests

Graphene/graphene oxide-based energy storage systems (supercapacitors, batteries) and their integrations with various textiles for smart bodysuit prototypes; protonic conducting membranes based on graphene derivatives for hydrogen-air fuel cells; and quantum dot synthesis for sensing, catalysis and biological applications

Selected Publications
  • W. Gao, G. Wu, M. T. Janicke, D. A. Cullen, R. Mukundan, J. K. Baldwin, E. L. Brosha, C. Galande, P. M. Ajayan, K. L. More, A. M. Dattelbaum and P. Zelenay, Ozonated Graphene Oxide Film as a Proton Exchange Membrane, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 14, 3588-3593.
  • W. Gao, N. Singh, L. Song, Z. Liu, A. L. M. Reddy, L. Ci, R. Vajtai, Q. Zhang, B. Wei, and P. M. Ajayan, Direct Laser Writing of Micro-supercapacitors on Hydrated Graphite Oxide Films, Nature Nanotechnology 2011, 6, 496-500.
  • W. Gao, M. Majumder, L. B. Alemany, T. N. Narayanan, M. A. Ibarr, B. K. Pradhan, and P. M. Ajayan, Engineered Graphite Oxide Materials for Application in Water Purification, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2011, 3, 1821-1826.

Dr. Guoliang JinGuoliang Jin
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (expected 2014), University of Wisconsin–Madison

Jin is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin–Madison; he expects to finish his PhD at the end of 2014. He received his BE in computer science and technology from the University of Science and Technology of China in 2007.

Jin’s research areas are software systems and software reliability, with a focus on understanding, detecting, diagnosing, and fixing concurrency bugs and performance bugs. His work on automated concurrency-bug fixing received a SIGPLAN CACM nomination with the comment, “this is one of the first papers to attack the problem of automated bug fixing.”

Research Interests

Systems, software reliability, program analysis, and software engineering, focusing on solving issues caused by concurrency bugs and performance bugs

Selected Publications
  • Bill Harris, Guoliang Jin, Shan Lu, and Somesh Jha. “Validating Library Usage Interactively.” In Proceedings of the 25th international conference on Computer Aided Verification, CAV ’13, July 2013.
  • Guoliang Jin, Wei Zhang, Dongdong Deng, Ben Liblit, and Shan Lu. “Automated Concurrency-Bug Fixing.” In Proceedings of the 10th USENIX Conference on Operating Systems Design and Implementation, OSDI ’12, October 2012.
  • Guoliang Jin, Linhai Song, Xiaoming Shi, Joel Scherpelz, and Shan Lu. “Understanding and Detecting Real-World Performance Bugs.” In Proceedings of the 33rd ACM SIGPLAN Conference on Programming Language Design and Implementation, PLDI ’12, June 2012.
  • Guoliang Jin, Linhai Song, Wei Zhang, Shan Lu, and Ben Liblit. “Automated Atomicity- Violation Fixing.” In Proceedings of the 32nd ACM SIGPLAN Conference on Programming Language Design and Implementation, PLDI ’11, June 2011.
  • Guoliang Jin, Aditya Thakur, Ben Liblit, and Shan Lu. “Instrumentation and Sampling Strategies for Cooperative Concurrency Bug Isolation.” In Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Object Oriented Programming Systems Languages and Applications, OOPSLA ’10, October 2010.

Dr. Jim LevisJim Levis
Research Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2013), North Carolina State University

Levis received his BS in mechanical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. He received his MS and PhD in civil engineering from NC State. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at NC State.

Presently he is developing and using a life-cycle optimization framework to analyze the interrelated effects of electricity and transportation systems and greenhouse gas policies on sustainable solid waste management and resource recovery. He is also investigating the most sustainable ways to recover nutrients and energy from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW), as well as exploring sustainable long-term management of MSW for local communities. Additionally, Levis is developing a dynamic life-cycle optimization model capable of estimating optimal configurations and process choices for photosynthetic bioreactors used in microalgae-to-biofuel systems.

Research Interests

Development and use of novel life-cycle, simulation and optimization models for decision support with primary applications related to integrated waste management, energy systems and sustainable infrastructure

Selected Publications
  • Levis, J. W., Barlaz, M. A., DeCarolis, J. F., Ranjithan, S. R. (2014). A Systematic Exploration of Efficient Strategies to Manage Solid Waste in U.S. Municipalities: Perspectives from the Solid Waste Optimization Life-Cycle Framework (SWOLF). Environ Sci Technol. 48(7): 3625-3631
  • Levis, J. W., Barlaz, M. A., DeCarolis, J. F., Ranjithan, S. R. (2013). A generalized multistage optimization modeling framework for life cycle assessment-based integrated solid waste management. Environ. Modell. Softw. 50(2013): 51-65.
  • Levis, J. W., Barlaz, M. A. (2011). What is the Most Environmentally Beneficial Way to Treat Commercial Food Waste? Environ Sci Technol. 45(17): 7438-7444.
  • Levis, J. W., Barlaz, M. A. (2011). Is Biodegradability a Desirable Attribute for Discarded Solid Waste? Perspectives from a National Landfill Greenhouse Gas Inventory Model. Environ Sci Technol. 45(13): 5470-5476.

Dr. Tim MenziesTim Menzies
Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (1995), University of New South Wales, Australia

Menzies received his BS in computer science from the University of New South Wales, as well as his MS in cognitive science and PhD in artificial intelligence. He has previously served as NASA’s software engineering research chair (IV&V Center, Fairmont, USA). Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was an associate professor of computer science at West Virginia University.

Presently he studies how to combine human and artificial intelligence for applications in software engineering, as well as other fields such as health science and cockpit design. He is the author of more than 200 refereed publications and is one of the 100 most cited authors in software engineering (out of nearly 40,000 researchers). Menzies is the co-founder of the PROMISE conference series devoted to reproducible experiments in software engineering. He is an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, Empirical Software Engineering, and Automated Software Engineering.

Research Interests

Software engineering and data mining and AI and search-based SE and open science

Selected Publications
  • Tim Menzies, Andrew Butcher, David R. Cok, Andrian Marcus, Lucas Layman, Forrest Shull, Burak Turhan, Thomas Zimmermann: Local versus Global Lessons for Defect Prediction and Effort Estimation. IEEE Trans. Software Eng. 39(6): 822-834 (2013).
  • Tim Menzies with Fayola Peters, Liang Gong, Hongyu Zhang: Balancing Privacy and Utility in Cross-Company Defect Prediction. IEEE Trans. Software Eng. 39(8): 1054-1068 (2013).
  • Tim Menzies, Adam Brady, Jacky Keung, Jairus Hihn, Steve Williams, Oussama El-Rawas, Phillip Green II, Barry W. Boehm: Learning Project Management Decisions: A Case Study with Case-Based Reasoning versus Data Farming. IEEE Trans. Software Eng. 39(12): 1698-1713 (2013).
  • Tim Menzies with Ekrem Kocaguneli, Ayse Bener, Jacky W. Keung: Exploiting the Essential Assumptions of Analogy-Based Effort Estimation. IEEE Trans. Software Eng. 38(2): 425-438 (2012).

Dr. Marie MullerMarie Muller
Assistant Professor
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2006), University Paris Diderot, Paris, France

Muller received her BS in physics from the University Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France. She received her MS and PhD in physical acoustics from the University Paris Diderot in Paris, France. She was a postdoctoral fellow with the Institut Langevin in Paris and later at the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, Muller was an assistant professor with the Institut Langevin, University Paris Diderot.

Presently, she studies the propagation of elastic waves in complex media in order to build models for the assessment of the micro-architectural properties of a medium using ultrasound. She works in tandem with experimental, numerical and theoretical approaches. In particular, she develops methods for the characterization of micro-damage in bone using ultrasound. She also works on elastographic methods based on ultrafast ultrasonic imaging for the measurement of the viscoelastic properties of biological tissue.

Research Interests

Propagation of acoustic and elastic waves in complex media and application to nondestructive characterization of complex biological media (bone and soft tissue)

Selected Publications
  • Muller M., Moilanen P., Bossy E., Nicholson P., Timonen J., Talmant M., Cheng S., Laugier P.: Comparison of three ultrasonic axial transmission methods for bone assessment, Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, 31(5), (2005), 633-642.
  • Muller M., Sutin A., Guyer R., Talmant M., Laugier P., Johnson P.: Nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) applied to damage assessment in bone, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 188(6), (2005).
  • Muller M., Gennisson J.L., Deffieux T., Tanter M., Fink M.: Quantitative viscoelasticity mapping of human liver using Supersonic shear imaging: A feasibility study, Ultrasound Med. Biol., 35(2), (2009) 219-229.
  • Muller M., Renaud G.: Nonlinear acoustics for non-invasive assessment of bone micro-damage, In Quantitative Ultrasound of Bone, Springer, Ed. P. Laugier and G. Haiat, 2010.

Dr. Daniel ObenourDaniel Obenour
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2013), University of Michigan

Obenour received a BS in civil engineering from the University of Akron. He received an MS in environmental and water resources engineering from The University of Texas at Austin and a PhD in natural resources and environmental engineering from the University of Michigan. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was a lecturer and postdoctoral fellow, conducting research at the University of Michigan Water Center and the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory.

Obenour has a broad background in environmental and water resources engineering. At The University of Texas, Obenour developed GIS approaches for creating, managing and visualizing hydrologic and hydraulic modeling information. As a consulting engineer, he developed watershed and water quality models to address environmental impairments in streams and reservoirs. Presently, his research involves the development of probabilistic modeling approaches for assessing how natural and anthropogenic stressors affect water quality in lakes and estuaries and for assessing how these systems will respond to future management and climate conditions. His current work is largely focused on harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie and hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) along the Gulf of Mexico coast. He looks forward to expanding his research to address environmental issues in North Carolina in the coming years.

Research Interests

Water quality and watershed modeling, probabilistic environmental forecasting using bayesian/hierarchical methods and geospatial statistics

Selected Publications
  • Obenour, D.R., A.M. Michalak, & D. Scavia. (2014 – In Press). Assessing biophysical control on Gulf of Mexico hypoxia through probabilistic modeling. Ecological Applications.
  • Obenour, D.R., D. Scavia, N.N. Rabalais, R.E. Turner, & A.M. Michalak (2013). Retrospective analysis of mid-summer hypoxic area and volume in the northern Gulf of Mexico, 1985-2011. Environmental Science and Technology, 47(17), 9808–9815.
  • Zhou, Y., D.R. Obenour, D. Scavia, T.H. Johengen, & A.M. Michalak. (2013). Spatial and temporal trends in Lake Erie hypoxia, 1987-2007. Environmental Science and Technology, 47(2), 899-905.

Dr. Chris ParninChris Parnin
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2014), Georgia Institute of Technology

Parnin is a three-time graduate of the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology, receiving a PhD in 2014. His research spans the study of software engineering from empirical, HCI and cognitive neuroscience perspectives. He has worked in Human Interactions in Programming groups at Microsoft Research, performed field studies with ABB Research and has more than a decade of professional programming experience in the defense industry.

His research has been recognized through the receipt of the SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award at ICSE 2009, the Best Paper Award at ICPC 2012 and the IBM HVC Most Influential Paper Award 2013; he was also named a Best Paper Nominee at CHI 2010. Game Developer magazine, Hacker Monthly and Huffington Post have featured his work, and Hacker News, Reddit and Slashdot have frequently discussed Parnin’s research.

Research Interests

Examines futuristic programming environments that are facilitated by natural interactions, including gestures, and bio-sensing. Examines how mediums such as Stack Overflow enable a crowd of developers to more effectively create software; build tools that can analyze, visualize and harness crowd’s effort; and collects large-scale empirical evidence about software practices and processes

Selected Publications
  • J. Siegmund, C. Kästner, S. Apel, C. Parnin, A. Bethmann, T. Leich, G. Saake, A. Brechmann. 2014, “Understanding Source Code with Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging,” International Conference on Software Engineering.
  • C. Parnin, C. Treude, MA Storey. 2013, “Blogging Developer Knowledge: Motivations, Challenges, and Future Directions,” International Conference on Program Comprehension.
  • C. Parnin, C. Bird, E. Murphy-Hill. 2012, “Adoption and Use of Java generics,” Empirical Software Engineering.
  • C. Parnin, S. Rugaber. 2012, “Programmer Information Needs After Memory Failure,” International Conference on Program Comprehension.
  • C. Parnin, A. Orso. 2011, “Are Automated Debugging Techniques Actually Helping Programmers?,” International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis.

Dr. Xipeng ShenXipeng Shen
Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2006), University of Rochester

Shen received his MS and PhD in computer science from the University of Rochester. He received an MS in pattern recognition and intelligent systems from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and a BE in industrial engineering from North China University of Technology.

Prior to joining NC State, Shen was the Adina Allen Term Distinguished Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the College of William and Mary. He was a visiting researcher at MIT, Microsoft Research, and Intel Labs between 2012 and 2013, and he was an assistant professor at the College of William and Mary from 2006 to 2012. Shen is a recipient of the Early Career Research Award from the US Department of Energy in 2011 and the CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 2010. He has been an IBM Canada CAS Research Faculty Fellow since 2010.

Shen has been particularly interested in capturing large-scale program behavior patterns, in both data accesses and code executions, and exploiting them for scalable and efficient computing in a heterogeneous, massively parallel environment. His research leverages multidisciplinary techniques, from compiler technology to machine learning, programming languages and computational theory.

Research Interests

Compiler and runtime systems; extreme-scale data-intensive computing; accelerator-based heterogeneous high-performance computing (GPU, CELL, etc.); virtual machines and just-in-time compilation; program dynamic optimizations and parallelization; and statistical machine learning

Selected Publications
  • Zhao, Zhou, and Shen, “SatScore: Uncovering and Avoiding a Principled Pitfall in Responsiveness Measurements of App Launches,” ASPLOS, 2014.
  • Ding, Zhou, Zhao, Eisenstat, Shen, “Finding the Limit: Examining the Potential and Complexity of Compilation Scheduling for JIT-Based Runtime Systems,” ASPLOS, 2014.
  • Wu, Zhao, Shen, Jiang, Gao, Silvera, “Exploiting Inter-Sequence Correlations for Program Behavior Prediction,” OOPSLA, 2012.

Dr. Daryoosh VashaeeDaryoosh Vashaee
Associate Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2004), University of California, Santa Cruz

Vashaee has led or contributed to several of the most important discoveries in the area of nanomaterials and devices for thermoelectric energy conversion. He realized that large thermoelectric figure of merit is possible in metal-semiconductor superlattices, provided the foundation and worked out the details. He formulated the effect of non-conservation of transverse momentum in carrier energy filtering in superlattices. His subsequent work with the PIs at the Office of Naval Research MURI Thermionic Energy Conversion Center resulted in the development of ErAs rare earth nanocomposites and ScN/ZrWN multilayers.

His work with several PIs at MIT on nanostructured BiSbTe resulted in a 40 percent increase in its ZT, which opened a new landscape for the development of high-efficiency thermoelectric materials. He developed new materials based on metal silicide nanocomposites, including SiGe-CrSi2, SiGe-FeSi2, SiGe-Mg2Si and MnSi1.7. His work on type VIII Si46 Clathrate predicted an extraordinarily large thermoelectric power factor in this so far hypothetical material structure. Vashaee has published more than 130 technical articles and is the winner of the 2004 Goldsmid Award for research excellence in thermoelectrics. He worked at MIT as a postdoctoral scholar and worked at Oklahoma State University as a member of the electrical and computer engineering faculty. He arrived at NC State in 2014.

Research Interests

Microelectronics and nanotechnology, thermoelectric and thermionic energy conversion, solar hydrogen production, and materials for tissue engineering

Selected Publications
  • Simultaneous enhancement of mechanical and thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline magnesium silicide with conductive glass inclusion, N. Satyala, J. S. Krasinski, D. Vashaee, Acta Materialia, 74:141–150 (2014).
  • Prediction of a large number of electron pockets near the band edges in type-VIII clathrate Si46 and its physical properties from first principles, P. Norouzzadeh, C. W. Myles, and D. Vashaee, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter, 25, 475502 (2013).

Dr. Ranga Raju VatsavaiRanga Raju Vatsavai
Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science
Associate Director of Computational Methods, Center for Geospatial Analytics
PhD (2008), University of Minnesota

Vatsavai received his MS and PhD in computer science from the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis. Over the past two decades he has worked at premier research laboratories, including the Center for Advanced Computing in Pune, India; AT&T Labs in Middletown, NJ; the Remote Sensing Lab at the University of Minnesota; IBM-Research in New Delhi; and most recently as the lead data scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Most of his research focused on developing novel and computationally efficient algorithms for extracting patterns from large scale spatial and spatiotemporal databases. Vatsavai’s work on UMN-MapServer has been widely adopted across the world.

Presently Vatsavai is working at the intersection of big data management, data analytics and high-performance computing with applications in national security, geospatial intelligence, natural resources, climate change, location-based services and human terrain mapping. He is serving on program committees of several international conferences, including ACM KDD and ACM GIS, and co-organizing workshops on emerging research themes, including Big Data Analytics with the Supercomputing, BigSpatial with the ACM GIS, and Spatial and Spatiotemporal Data Mining with the IEEE ICDM conference. He has published more than 75 peer-reviewed articles in leading conferences and journals.

Research Interests

Large-scale spatial and spatiotemporal databases and data mining remote sensing, image understanding, and spatial computing high-performance, distributed, and cloud computing

Selected Publications
  • Vatsavai, R. 2013. “Gaussian multiple instance learning approach for mapping the slums of the world using very high resolution imagery.” ACM KDD: 1419-1426.
  • Vatsavai, R. Graesser, J. 2012. “Probabilistic Change Detection Framework for Analyzing Settlement Dynamics Using Very High-resolution Satellite Imagery. ICCS: 907-916.
  • Chandola, V., and Vatsavai, R. 2011. “A scalable Gaussian process analysis algorithm for biomass monitoring.” Statistical Analysis and Data Mining, 4(4), 430-445.

ec-new-faculty2014weltonSteven S. Welton
Lecturer
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
MS (1992), NC State University

Welton joined the department with more than 24 years of practicing experience as a structural engineer and with more than 14 years of having his own structural engineering consulting firm. Welton began his engineering education at NC State in 1984. After completing his BS in 1988, he continued at NC State and obtained an MS in civil engineering in 1992. After working for several different firms and gaining diverse structural engineering experience with different types of buildings and structures, Welton then founded his own consulting firm, Welton Structural Design, PC (WSD) in 2000. Projects completed by WSD are both new and renovations of existing buildings that include schools, institutional buildings, office buildings and anti-terrorism/force protection building upgrades. Welton is a registered professional engineer in North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.

Welton has participated in all aspects of a project’s development through investigations, schematic design, value engineering, contract documents, construction administration and special inspections. His understanding and experience with the entire building design and construction process provides him with a unique perspective that he is able to share with the students. Welton also welcomes open communication and teamwork while maintaining his commitment to the profession and the public to which he serves. This simple approach has provided success for WSD, and it is a critical component that Welton strives to share with the students at NC State as a part of their education as they begin their own careers.

Welton currently teaches the steel design class, CE 426, and the senior design class, CE 420, in the department.

Selected Publications
  • Schultz, A. E., Welton, S. S., and Rey, L. E., (1994). Sustained Load Effects on the Seismic Performance of Concrete Columns. Fifth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering, July 1994.
  • Welton, S. S. and Schultz, A. E., (1992). Effects of Sustained Load on the Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Columns: Part 2 – Experiment. Department of Civil Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh.

Year 2013-14

Dr. Tameshia S. BallardTameshia S. Ballard
Director of Engineering Education
Office of Academic Affairs, College of Engineering
Teaching Assistant Professor
Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education
College of Education
PhD (2008), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Ballard received her BS in biological engineering from North Carolina State University. She received her MS and PhD degrees in biological systems engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to joining NC State, she was a faculty member in the Department of Food Science at Purdue University, with a primary focus on educational scholarship in the area of food process engineering/food science.

Ballard will provide leadership in engineering education initiatives that facilitate partnerships and collaboration among faculty in the College of Engineering and the Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education within the College of Education. Presently, she is studying the impact of student success programs for women and underrepresented minorities on their retention, self-efficacy, motivation and persistence in STEM fields. She also teaches courses in the first-year engineering program and in the Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education.

Research Interests

Self-efficacy, motivation and persistence of women and underrepresented minorities in STEM fields; and K-12 teacher professional development in STEM

Selected Publications
  • Liceaga, A., Ballard, T. and Skura, B. 2011. “Incorporating a modified problem-based learning exercise in a traditional lecture and lab-based dairy products course.” Journal of Food Science Education. 10(2): 19-22.
  • Ballard, T., Mallikarjunan, P., Zhou, K. and O’Keefe, S. “Microwave-assisted extraction of phenolic antioxidants from peanut skins.” 2010. Food Chemistry. 120(4): 1185-1192.
  • Ballard, T.S., Mallikarjunan, P., Zhou, K. and O’Keefe, S. 2009. “Optimizing the extraction of phenolic antioxidants from peanut skins using response surface methodology.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 57(8): 3064-3072.
  • Ballard, T.S. and Mallikarjunan, P. 2006. “The effect of edible coatings and pressure frying using nitrogen gas on the quality of breaded fried chicken nuggets.” Journal of Food Science. 71(3): S259-S264.
  • Ballard, T., Mallikarjunan, P. and Duncan, S.E. 2007. “Consumer assessment of crispness of pressure fried chicken nuggets using nitrogen gas.” Journal of Foodservice. 18(1): 1-6.

Dr. Matthew BryantMatthew Bryant
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2012), Cornell University

Bryant holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Bucknell University, where he graduated summa cum laude in 2007. He earned his master’s degree in 2011 and PhD in 2012, both in mechanical engineering from Cornell University. Prior to joining the faculty at NC State, Bryant worked as a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer at Cornell and was the recipient of an Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Fellowship.

His research interests encompass topics in smart materials and structures, fluid-structure interaction, ambient energy harvesting, and actuation systems. Of particular interest are novel, multidisciplinary approaches guided by bio-inspired designs. Recent areas of study include energy harvesting using structures that flap or flutter due to nonlinear aeroelastic vibration, unsteady aerodynamics of oscillating wings, and wake-structure interactions of groups of deformable bodies in a flowing fluid. Bryant also studies actuation of walking- and climbing-legged robots using lightweight and compliant fluidic artificial muscles. These areas are investigated using a combination of analytic and experimental approaches with an emphasis on reduced order and semi-empirical modeling that seeks to enable system design by capturing the salient physical phenomena.

Research Interests

Applications of smart materials and structures to energy harvesting, actuation and control; fluid-structure interaction, aeroelasticity and unsteady aerodynamics; and bio-inspired devices and systems

Selected Publications
  • Bryant, M., Gomez, J. C., and Garcia, E., “Low Order Aerodynamic Modeling of Flapping Wing Energy Harvesting at Low Reynolds Number,” AIAA Journal (In Press).
  • Shafer, M. W., Bryant, M., and Garcia, E., “Designing Maximum Power Output into Piezoelectric Energy Harvesters,” Smart Materials and Structures Journal, Vol. 21, 2012.
  • Bryant, M., Mahtani, R. L., and Garcia, E., “Wake Synergies Enhance Performance in Aeroelastic Vibration Energy Harvesting,” Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, Vol. 23, pp. 1131-1141, 2012.
  • Bryant, M., Wolff, E., and Garcia, E., “Aeroelastic Flutter Energy Harvester Design: The Sensitivity of the Driving Instability to System Parameters,” Smart Materials and Structures Journal, Vol. 20, 2011.
  • Bryant, M. and Garcia, E., “Modeling and Testing of a Novel Aeroelastic Flutter Energy Harvester,” ASME Journal of Vibrations and Acoustics, Vol. 133(1), 011010, 2011.

Dr. Min ChiMin Chi
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2009), University of Pittsburgh

Chi received her BE in information science and technology from Xi’an Jiaotong University in Xi’an, China. She received her MS and PhD degrees from the Intelligent Systems Program at the University of Pittsburgh. She was a postdoctoral fellow in the Machine Learning Department in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University and then in the Human-Sciences and Technologies Advanced Research Institute at Stanford University.

Chi’s research sits at the intersection of machine learning and data mining, learning technology, learning science and cognitive science. She is particularly interested in applying various data mining and machine learning algorithms to find meaningful patterns from various human-computer interaction datasets. She has received the Best Paper Award at the Intelligent Tutoring Systems Conference and the James Chen Best Student Paper Award at the User Modeling, Adaptation and Personalization Conference in 2010. She also received the Best Student Paper Award at the 2008 Intelligent Tutoring Systems Conference.

Research Interests

Artificial intelligence, machine learning, reinforcement learning, cognitive modeling, and educational data mining; human-computer interaction: intelligent tutoring systems, educational games and natural language tutoring systems; cognitive and learning sciences: transfer, preparation for future learning, metacognition and cognitive factors

Selected Publications
  • Chi, M., K. VanLehn, D. J. Litman, and P. W. Jordan (2012). “An evaluation of pedagogical tutorial tactics for a natural language tutoring system: A reinforcement learning approach.” In: International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education.
  • Chi, M., K. VanLehn, D. J. Litman, and P. W. Jordan (2011). “Empirically evaluating the application of reinforcement learning to the induction of effective and adaptive pedagogical strategies.” In: User Model. User-Adapt. Interact. 21.1-2, pp. 137–180.
  • Chi, M. and K. VanLehn (2010). “Meta-cognitive strategy instruction in intelligent tutoring systems: How, when, and why.” In: Journal of Educational Technology and Society 13.1, pp. 25–39.
  • Chi, M., K. VanLehn, and D. J. Litman (2010). “Do Micro-Level Tutorial Decisions Matter: Applying Reinforcement Learning to Induce Pedagogical Tutorial Tactics.” In: Intelligent Tutoring Systems, 10th International Conference, ITS 2010, Proceedings, Part I. ed. By V. Aleven, J. Kay, and J. Mostow. Vol. 6094. Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer, pp. 224–234. [Winner, Best Paper Award.]

Dr. Jacqueline (Jacque) ColeJacqueline (Jacque) Cole
Assistant Professor
Joint NC State-UNC Department of Biomedical Engineering
PhD (2007), Cornell University

Cole received a BME in mechanical engineering in 2001 from Auburn University. She was named the Outstanding Co-op Student of the Year in 2000 for her work experience in manufacturing. She received an MS in 2004 and a PhD in 2007 in mechanical engineering from Cornell University, where she specialized in the biomechanics of aging human bone. She was a postdoctoral research fellow in chemistry at the University of Michigan and was awarded a National Institutes of Health Ruth L. Kirchstein National Research Service Award in 2008, 2009 and 2010. She recently completed a second postdoctoral fellowship in orthopaedic surgery at the University of Michigan. Cole has extensive experience in whole bone and tissue mechanics, tissue composition, cellular (osteoblast) activity, and bone imaging and diagnostics.

The overall goal of Cole’s research is to improve current strategies for treating bone loss with aging, disease (e.g., cardiomyopathies, diabetes), and other conditions such as stroke by examining bone-vascular interactions and their influence on bone mechanics and bone cell function. Specifically, her lab is focused on developing imaging protocols to characterize changes in bone and vascular morphology and structure, monitoring activity in bone and vascular cells, and exploring potential mechanisms for these changes using animal models. Understanding more about the effects of bone-vascular interactions on bone properties and how they are altered with various conditions and treatments will provide insight into better therapeutic strategies to minimize bone loss and maintain skeletal integrity.

Research Interests

Bone mechanics, bone-vascular interactions, aging, fracture, stroke, exercise and aerobic metabolism

Selected Publications
  • Cole JH and van der Meulen MCH (2011). “Whole Bone Mechanics and Bone Quality.” Clin Orthop Relat Res 469:2139-2149.
  • Cole JH, Dowthwaite J, Scerpella TA, van der Meulen MCH (2009). “Correcting fan-beam magnification in clinical densitometry scans of growing subjects.” J Clin Densitom 12(3):322-329.
  • Schulmerich MV, Cole JH, Kreider JM, Esmonde-White F, Dooley KA, Goldstein SA, Morris MD (2009). “Transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy of murine bone in vivo.” Appl Spectrosc 63(3): 286-295.
  • Schulmerich MV, Cole JH, Dooley KA, Morris MD, Kreider JM, Goldstein SA, Srinivasan S, Pogue BW (2008). “Noninvasive Raman tomographic imaging of canine bone tissue.” J Biomed Opt 13(2):020506.
  • Cole JH, Scerpella TA, van der Meulen MCH (2005) “Fan-beam densitometry in the growing skeleton: Are we measuring what we think we are?” J Clin Densitom 8(1):57-64.

Dr. Emiel DenHartogEmiel DenHartog
Associate Professor
Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science
Co-Director
Textile Protection and Comfort Center
PhD (1997), Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands

From 1997 to 2013, DenHartog has been working in various formal and informal roles as senior scientist, project manager and coordinator of the R&D efforts in personal protective clothing and equipment at TNO Defense, Safety and Security in the Netherlands, an independent not-for-profit contract research organization. In this role, he combined human factors expertise (ergonomics, physiology, psychology) with the available technical expertise on ballistic and chemical/biological protection, textiles, sensor technology and other technology areas to apply research to solve questions and problems for customers. The main customers were the Netherlands and foreign armed forces, firefighters, law enforcement and athletes.

From August 2005 to August 2006, DenHartog worked as an exchange scientist in the Individual Protection Directorate of Natick Soldier Center, a US Army lab that performs R&D on personal protective clothing and equipment for soldiers.

His main research focus at NC State will be to combine basic science concepts and new technologies into protective clothing systems and analyzing and evaluating their added values for workers who need to perform in hazardous conditions.

Research Interests

Human performance in protective clothing systems based on studying technical aspects of clothing systems and textile material performance measures and analyzing their impact on human physiology, psychology and ergonomics

Selected Publications
  • G Havenith, I Holmér, EA DenHartog, KC Parsons, “Clothing evaporative heat resistance — proposal for improved representation in standards and models,” 1999, Annals of Occupational Hygiene 43 (5), 339-346.
  • J Malchaire, A Piette, B Kampmann, P Mehnert, HJ Gebhardt, G Havenith, E DenHartog, “Development and validation of the predicted heat strain model,” 2001, Annals of Occupational Hygiene 45 (2), 123-135.
  • G Havenith, MG Richards, X Wang, P Bröde, V Candas, E DenHartog, I Holmér, “Apparent latent heat of evaporation from clothing: attenuation and ‘heat pipe’ effects,” 2008, Journal of Applied Physiology 104 (1), 142-149.
  • J Malchaire, Q Geng, E DenHartog, G Havenith, I Holmer, A Piette, SL Powell, “Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces,” 2002, Annals of Occupational Hygiene 46 (2), 157-163.

Dr. Joel "Casey" DietrichJoel (Casey) Dietrich
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2011), University of Notre Dame

Dietrich received three degrees from the University of Oklahoma before moving to the University of Notre Dame for his PhD in civil engineering, studying with Dr. Joannes Westerink. After leaving Notre Dame, he worked as a research associate for three years at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin.

Dietrich has developed and validated high-resolution computational models of hurricane waves and storm surge along the Gulf Coast, and these models have been used for levee design by the US Army Corps of Engineers and for floodplain risk assessment by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. He has also applied these models in an operational framework to forecast storms including Hurricane Isaac, which occured in 2012, as well as oil transport following the BP spill in 2010.

Research Interests

Coastal hydrodynamics, large-scale modeling of coastal hazards, finite elements and high-performance computing

Selected Publications
  • JC Dietrich, et al. (2012). “Performance of the Unstructured-Mesh, SWAN+ADCIRC Model in Computing Hurricane Waves and Surge.” Journal of Scientific Computing, 52(2), 468-497, DOI:10.1007/s10915-011-9555-6.
  • JC Dietrich, et al. (2012). “Surface Trajectories of Oil Transport along the Northern Coastline of the Gulf of Mexico.” Continental Shelf Research, 41(1), 17-47, DOI:10.1016/j.csr.2012.03.015.
  • JC Dietrich, et al. (2011). “Hurricane Gustav (2008) Waves and Storm Surge: Hindcast, Validation and Synoptic Analysis in Southern Louisiana.” Monthly Weather Review, 139(8), 2488-2522, DOI:10.1175/2011MWR3611.1.
  • JC Dietrich, et al. (2011). “Modeling Hurricane Waves and Storm Surge using Integrally-Coupled, Scalable Computations.” Coastal Engineering, 58, 45-65, DOI:10.1016/j.coastaleng.2010.08.001.
  • JC Dietrich, et al. (2010). “A High-Resolution Coupled Riverine Flow, Tide, Wind, Wind Wave and Storm Surge Model for Southern Louisiana and Mississippi: Part II – Synoptic Description and Analysis of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.” Monthly Weather Review, 138(2), 378-404, DOI:10.1175/ 2009MWR2907.1.

Dr. Nam DinhNam Dinh
Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
PhD (1991), D.Sc. (1994), Moscow Power Engineering Institute

Dinh has more than 20 years of R&D and engineering experience in areas of nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics and nuclear power safety. Prior to joining the faculty at NC State, he worked at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), where he was a Laboratory Fellow, director of the Center of Research and Education on Safety and Licensing at the Institute for Nuclear Energy Science and Technology, and academic dean for the “Modeling, Experimentation and Validation” summer school. Prior to INL, Dinh was Chair Professor of Nuclear Power Safety at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, and performed research at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

His research is focused on modeling and analysis of multi-phase thermal-fluid phenomena of importance to nuclear reactor design and safety. Of particular interest are physics and prediction of boiling heat transfer, critical heat flux, and other intense multi-phase interactions that govern nuclear reactor safety margins. Dinh’s group is developing a laboratory to support research projects on two-phase thermal-hydraulics modeling and simulation and severe accident risk assessment and management.

Research Interests

Multiphase flow systems with phase change and their application in nuclear power plant safety analysis, and severe accident risk assessment and management

Selected Publications
  • T.N. Dinh, M.J. Konovalikhin, and B.R. Sehgal, “Core Melt Spreading on a Reactor Containment Floor,” Progress in Nuclear Energy, 36:(4), pp. 405-468, 2000.
  • T.N. Dinh, and T.G. Theofanous, “Nucleation Phenomena in Boiling,” Multiphase Science and Technology. 15(1-4), pp. 349-363, 2003.
  • T.N. Dinh, R.R. Nourgaliev, and T.G. Theofanous, “On the Multiscale Treatment of Multifluid Flow,” Multiphase Science and Technology. 15(1-4), pp. 275-288, 2003.
  • T.G. Theofanous and T.N. Dinh, “Integration of Multi-Phase Science and Technology with Risk Management in Nuclear Power Reactors: Application of the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology to the Economic, Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Design,” Multiphase Science and Technology, v. 20(2), pp. 91-223, 2008.
  • C.T. Tran and T.N. Dinh, “The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head. Part I: Physical Processes, Modeling and Model Implementation,” pp. 849-859, 2009. “Part II: Model Assessment and Application,” Progress in Nuclear Energy, Vol. 51, No. 8, pp. 860-871, 2009.

Dr. He (Helen) HuangHe (Helen) Huang
Associate Professor
Joint UNC-NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering
PhD (2006), Arizona State University

Huang received a BS from Xi’an Jiaotong University in China and MS and PhD degrees from Arizona State University. She was a postdoctoral research associate in the Center for Bionic Medicine at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, she was an assistant professor from 2008 to 2012 and an associate professor from 2012 to 2013 at the University of Rhode Island, both in biomedical engineering. She has received the Delsys Prize for Innovation in Electromyography, the Mary E. Switzer Fellowship with the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research and a National Science Foundation CAREER Award. She is a senior member of IEEE and member of the Society for Neuroscience.

Huang’s research interests lie in rehabilitation engineering and neural engineering. Her research covers the investigation of basic science, engineering development and clinical evaluation. The ongoing projects in her laboratory include the study of gait and balance in lower limb amputees, development of shared control for prostheses and exoskeletons, development of a safety system for artificial legs, and building foundations for clinical use of neurally controlled prosthetic arms.

Research Interests

Neural-machine interface for wearable robotics; modeling and analysis of neuromuscular control of movement; and intelligent control of therapeutic robots, orthotics and prosthetics

Selected Publications
  • H. Huang, F. Zhang, L. Hargrove, D. Rogers, K. Englehart, “Continuous Locomotion Mode Identification for Prosthetic Legs based on Neuromuscular-Mechanical Fusion,” IEEE Trans Biomed Eng, 58(1), pp. 2867-75, 2011.
  • F. Zhang, S.E. D’Andrea, M.J. Nunnery, S. Kay, H. Huang. “Towards design of a stumble detector for artificial legs.” IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng, Vol. 19(5): 567-77, 2011.
  • H. Huang, T.A. Kuiken, and R.D. Lipschutz, “A strategy for identifying locomotion modes using surface electromyography,” IEEE Trans Biomed Eng, vol. 56, pp. 65-73, 2009.
  • H. Huang, P. Zhou, G. Li, and T. A. Kuiken, “An analysis of EMG electrode configuration for targeted muscle reinnervation based neural machine interface,” IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng, vol. 16, pp. 37-45, 2008.
  • H. Huang, S. L. Wolf, and J. He, “Recent developments in biofeedback for neuromotor rehabilitation,” J Neuroeng Rehabil, vol. 3, pp. 11, 2006.

Dr. Alex HummelAlex Hummel
Research Assistant Professor
Textile Protection and Comfort Center
Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science
PhD (2011), North Carolina State University

Hummel received his BS in aerospace engineering from the University of Central Florida in 2007. He received his MS in 2009 and PhD in 2011 in mechanical engineering from North Carolina State University. He has worked as a postdoctoral researcher for the Textile Protection and Comfort Center (T-PACC) in the College of Textiles for the past year and a half.

While at T-PACC, Hummel has worked on multiple research projects specific to heat and flame hazards and fire protection textile testing for soldiers, structural firefighters and wildland firefighters. He is currently the co-principal investigator on research to develop a next generation firefighter turnout suit using new material technologies and innovative design concepts to minimize injuries to structural firefighters. His primary research interests revolve around testing and evaluating fire-protective clothing, modeling heat and moisture transport through clothing, and predicting burn injury in the human skin.

Other research interests include developing and evaluating passive and active micro-climate control solutions into garments for improved comfort and athletic performance for everyday clothing.

Research Interests

Fire protection science, protective clothing, heat/modeling modeling and simulation, structural and wildland firefighting, fire/flame-resistant textiles, instrumented testing technologies, and body heat transfer in active/performance apparel

Selected Publications
  • Hummel, A., Barker, R., Lyons, K. (2013). “Skin Burn Translation Model for Evaluating Hand Protection in Flash Fire Exposures.” Fire Technology. DOI 10.1007/s10694-013-0336-7.
  • Hummel, A., et al. (2012). “Developing a Thermal Sensor for Use in the Fingers of the PyroHands Fire Test System.” Performance of Protective Clothing and Equipment: 9th Volume, Emerging Issues and Technologies. DOI 10.1520/STP104207.
  • Hummel, A., et al. (2011). “Development of Instrumented Manikin Hands for Characterizing the Thermal Protective Performance of Gloves in Flash Fire Exposures.” Fire Technology, 47 (3), 615-629.

Dr. Jacob JonesJacob Jones
Associate Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2004), Purdue University

Jones received his BS and MS degrees in mechanical engineering from Purdue University in 1999 and 2001, respectively, then his PhD in materials engineering in 2004, also from Purdue. He was then awarded an international postdoctoral fellowship from the National Science Foundation, working primarily at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. He was an assistant and associate professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Florida from 2006 to 2013.

Jones’ research mainly develops structure-property-processing relationships in emerging functional materials through the use of advanced diffraction tools and techniques for in situ characterization. The primary functional materials under investigation include piezoelectric, ferroelectric and multiferroic crystals, thin films, and ceramics, which have applications including but not limited to impact and displacement sensors, actuators, microelectromechanical systems, diesel fuel injectors, vibrational energy harvesting, sonar and ultrasound.

Research Interests

Materials characterization, functional materials including piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials, mechanics of materials, and ceramic synthesis and properties

Selected Publications
  • G. Tutuncu, D. Damjanovic, J. Chen, and J. L. Jones, “Deaging and asymmetric energy landscapes in electrically biased ferroelectrics,” Physical Review Letters, Vol. 108, No. 177601 (2012).
  • C. R. Fell, M. Chi, S. Meng, and J. L. Jones, “In Situ X-ray Diffraction Study of the Lithium Excess Layered Oxide Compound Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 During Electrochemical Cycling,” Solid State Ionics, Vol. 207, pp. 44-49 (2012).
  • E. Aksel, J. S. Forrester, J. L. Jones, P. A. Thomas, K. Page, and M. R. Suchomel, “Monoclinic crystal structure of polycrystalline Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3,” Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 98, No. 152901 (2011).
  • A. Pramanick, D. Damjanovic, J. E. Daniels, J. C. Nino, and J. L. Jones, “Origins of electro-mechanical coupling in polycrystalline ferroelectrics during subcoercive electrical loading,” Journal of the American Ceramic Society(Invited Feature Article), Vol. 94, No. 2, pp. 293-309 (2011).
  • J. E. Daniels, W. Jo, J. Rödel, and J. L. Jones, “Electric-field-induced phase transformation at a lead-free morphotropic phase boundary: Case study in a 93%(Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3 – 7%BaTiO3 piezoelectric ceramic,” Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 95, No. 032904 (2009).

Dr. Frances S. LiglerFrances S. Ligler
Lampe Distinguished Professor
Joint UNC-NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering
D.Phil. (1997), Oxford University; D.Sc. (2000) Oxford University

Ligler joined NC State after 28 years at the Naval Research Laboratory, where she was Senior Scientist for Biosensors and Biomaterials. She is a member and past chair of the Bioengineering Section of the National Academy of Engineering. Currently working in the fields of biosensors, biomaterials, and microfluidics, she has also performed research in biochemistry, immunology, and proteomics. She has more than 350 full-length publications and patents, which have led to 11 commercial biosensor products and have been cited more than 8,200 times. She is the winner of the Navy Superior Civilian Service Medal, the National Drug Control Policy Technology Transfer Award, the Chemical Society Hillebrand Award, the Navy Merit Award, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Technology Transfer Award, three NRL Edison Awards for Patent of the Year, the Furman University Bell Tower and Distinguished Alumni of the 20th Century Awards, and the national Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Outstanding Achievement in Science Award.

She serves as an associate editor of analytical chemistry and on editorial/advisory boards for Biosensors & Bioelectronics, Analytical Bioanalytical Chemistry, Sensors, Open Optics, and Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology. Elected an SPIE Fellow in 2000 and a Fellow of AIMBE in 2011, she also serves on the organizing committee for the World Biosensors Congress and the permanent steering committee for Europt(r)odes, the European Conference on Optical Sensors. In 2003, she was awarded the Homeland Security Award (Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Field) by the Christopher Columbus Foundation and the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Senior Professional by President Bush. In 2012, she was awarded the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Senior Professional by President Obama.

Research Interests

Microfluidics, biomaterials, surface modification, tissue on chip, diagnostics, biosensors, nanotechnology and bioanalytical optics

Selected Publications
  • Boyd, D.A., A.R. Shields, P.B. Howell, and F.S. Ligler (2013) “Design and fabrication of uniquely shaped thiol-ene microfibers using a two-stage hydrodynamic focusing design.” Lab Chip, DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50413A.
  • Verbarg, J., W. D. Plath, L.C. Shriver-Lake, P.B. Howell, J.S. Erickson, J.P. Golden, and F.S. Ligler (2013) “Catch and release: Integrated system for multiplexed detection of bacteria.” Anal. Chem. 85, 4944-4950.
  • Shriver-Lake, L.C., J.P. Golden, L. Bracaglia, and F.S. Ligler (2013) “Simultaneous assay for ten bacteria and toxins in spiked clinical samples using a microflow cytometer.” Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 405, 5611-5614.

Dr. Gregory LucierGregory Lucier
Research Assistant Professor and Laboratory Manager
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2012), North Carolina State University

Lucier is a research assistant professor in structural engineering and also serves as manager of the Constructed Facilities Laboratory at NC State. He specializes in structural engineering and is experienced in the areas of large-scale experimental design, servo-hydraulic control, laboratory instrumentation, data acquisition, and project management.

Lucier received a BS in construction engineering and management in 2004 and MS and PhD degrees in structural engineering in 2006 and 2012, respectively, all from NC State. His doctoral work focused on torsion and shear in the end regions of precast/prestressed concrete L-spandrels. He has conducted additional research on many topics related to precast/prestressed concrete construction, including wall panels, ledge-punching shear, and dapped-end beams.

Research Interests

Precast and prestressed structural concrete systems; large-scale structural testing; composite sandwich structures; and applications of fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) in civil infrastructure

Selected Publications
  • Lucier, G., Walter, C., Rizkalla, S., Zia, P. and Klein, G., “Development of a Rational Design Methodology for Precast Slender Spandrel Beams: Part 2, Analysis and Design Guidelines,” PCI Journal, Fall 2011, Vol. 56, No. 4.
  • Lucier, G., Walter, C., Rizkalla, S., Zia, P. and Klein, G., “Development of a Rational Design Methodology for Precast Slender Spandrel Beams: Part 1, Experimental Results,” PCI Journal, Spring 2011, Vol. 56, No. 2.
  • Frankl, B., Lucier, G., Hassan, T. and Rizkalla, S., “Behavior of Precast, Prestressed Concrete Sandwich Wall Panels Reinforced with CFRP Grid,” PCI Journal, Spring 2011, Vol. 56, No. 2, pp. 42-54.
  • Hassan, T., Lucier, G., and Rizkalla, S., “Splice Strength of Large Diameter, High Strength Steel Reinforcing Bars,” Construction and Building Materials, July 2011, Vol. 26, Issue 1, pp. 216-225.
  • Rizkalla, S., Lucier, G. and Dawood, M., “Innovative use of FRP for the Precast Industry,” Advances in Structural Engineering, Vol. 15, No. 4, 2012.

Dr. Maria E. MayorgaMaria E. Mayorga
Associate Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (2006), University of California, Berkeley

Mayorga received her PhD in industrial engineering and operations research from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, she was on the faculty at Clemson University in the Department of Industrial Engineering for seven years.

She has authored more than 40 publications in archival journals and refereed proceedings. Her research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, among other sources. She is a member of INFORMS and the Institute of Industrial Engineers and area editor for the journals Health Systems, IIE Transactions and IIE Transactions on Healthcare Systems Engineering.

Mayorga’s main research interests can be divided into two areas: predictive models of health and economic outcomes and optimal resource allocation in emergency medical service (EMS) systems. In the first area, she combines statistical methods and simulation to make predictions about the progression and impact of a disease (e.g., diabetes) or behavior (e.g., drinking during pregnancy) at the population level and over long periods of time. Most recent efforts focus on assessing the effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening by considering patient choice and adherence to screening options. In the second area, she focuses on optimally (or near optimally) locating and dispatching EMS vehicles while introducing some of the complexities of real-world systems often overlooked in the literature; for example, revised decisions given that new information becomes available on-scene.

Research Interests

Predictive models of health outcomes, application of stochastic optimization in production and service systems with emphasis on health care services, modeling marketing and operations interface, and analysis of queuing systems

Selected Publications
  • Mayorga ME, Reifsnider OS, Neyens D, Gebregziabher M and Hunt KJ, 2013. “Projected Estimates of Pre-Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the US: 1980 to 2008.” In Press, PLOS ONE.
  • Mayorga ME, Bandara D and McLay LA, 2013. “Districting and Dispatching Polices to Improve the Efficiency of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Systems.” IIE Transactions in Healthcare Systems Engineering, Vol 3 (1), 39-56.
  • McLay LA and Mayorga ME. 2013. A dispatching model for server-to-customer systems that balances efficiency and equity. Manufacturing and Service Operations Management, Vol 15 (2), 205-220.

Dr. R. Bryan OrmondR. Bryan Ormond
Research Assistant Professor
Textile Protection and Comfort Center, Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science
PhD (2012), North Carolina State University

Ormond received his BS in polymer and color chemistry from NC State in 2007 and received his PhD in fiber and polymer science from NC State in 2012 while working in the Textile Protection and Comfort Center (T-PACC), where he also served as a postdoctoral research scholar and manager for the Chemical Protection Laboratory.

During his time at NC State, Ormond has grown the testing capabilities of T-PACC’s Chemical Protection Laboratory by bringing in more analytical techniques and establishing NC State’s Man-In-Simulant-Test (MIST) Facility as one of the most accurate and efficient places in the country to evaluate the protection provided by a whole chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) ensemble on human subjects. After incorporating his PhD research findings on the MIST into the American Society for Testing and Materials International and National Fire Protection Association test standards for first responder equipment, Ormond has begun to assess the validity and procedures used in other standard test methods for evaluating chemical permeation and penetration resistance. He is also actively working with industry manufacturers to design and evaluate the next generation components of CBRN ensembles such as more comfortable footwear with improved durability as well as flame- and chemical-resistant gloves with enhanced tactility and grip for individuals that respond to clandestine laboratories.

Research Interests

Development of CBRN protective equipment from the basic material-level chemical permeation testing to the whole ensemble evaluations with manikins and human test subjects. Analytical method development for toxic industrial chemicals utilizing air sampling, liquid- and solid-phase extractions, and multiple chromatographic techniques

Selected Publications
  • Ormond, R. B., Barker, R., “Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Protective Clothing,” in Protective Clothing: Managing Thermal Stress: 2013.
  • Ormond, R. B., Barker, R., Beck, K., Thompson, D., and Deaton, A. S., “Factors Influencing the Uptake Rate of Passive Adsorbent Dosimeters Used in the Man-In-Simulant-Test,” Performance of Protective Clothing and Equipment: Emerging Issues and Technologies, pp. 247-265, DOI: 10.1520/STP 104205, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2012.

Dr. Osman OzaltinOsman Ozaltin
Assistant Professor of Personalized Medicine
Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (2011), University of Pittsburgh

Ozaltin joined the faculty at NC State in August 2013 as a Chancellor’s Faculty Excellence Program cluster hire in personalized medicine. He is an assistant professor in the Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and part of the Healthcare Systems Engineering group. His methods include integer programming, combinatorial optimization, stochastic programming, bilevel programming, quadratic programming, and decomposition algorithms for large-scale mathematical programs.

Prior to arriving at NC State, Ozaltin was an assistant professor of management sciences at the University of Waterloo in Canada. His publications appeared in top academic journals including Operations Research and Mathematical Programming. He received the distinguished Institute of Industrial Engineers Best Dissertation Award in 2013 for his work to optimize the annual influenza vaccine design. Ozaltin’s formal education began with a BS in industrial engineering from Bogazici University in Istanbul, Turkey. He then received his MS and PhD degrees in industrial engineering from the University of Pittsburgh.

Research Interests

Decision making under uncertainty, optimization of service systems, particularly in health care; vaccine design and supply chain; public health policy making, public service delivery, disease management and treatment scheduling; optimization of parameters in bioinformatics models

Selected Publications
  • Ozaltin, O. Y., Prokopyev, O. A., Schaefer, A. J., “Two-stage quadratic integer programs with stochastic right-hand-sides.” Mathematical Programming, 133(1-2):121-158, 2012.
  • Ozaltin, O. Y., Prokopyev, O. A., Schaefer, A. J., Roberts, M. S., “Optimizing the Societal Benefits of the Annual Influenza Vaccine: A Stochastic Programming Approach.” Operations Research, 59(5):1131-1143, 2011.
  • Ozaltin, O. Y., Hunsaker B., Schaefer, A. J., “Predicting the solution time of branch-and-bound algorithms for mixed-integer programs,” INFORMS Journal on Computing, 23(3):392-403, 2011.
  • Ozaltin, O. Y., Prokopyev, O. A., Schaefer, A. J., “The bilevel knapsack problem with stochastic right-hand sides,” Operations Research Letters, 38(4):328-333, 2010.

Dr. Srikanth PatalaSrikanth Patala
Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2011), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Patala received his B.Tech. in metallurgical and materials engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras. He received his PhD in materials science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University.

Patala’s research will be focused on developing computational and analytical techniques to quantify the structure-property relationships in complex heterogeneous materials. Specific areas of interest currently include the analysis of interfacial properties, the role of interfaces in influencing the mechanical and transport-related phenomena in structural materials, statistical analysis and characterization of complex microstructures, and reliable reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) porous multi-phase microstructure in battery materials. State-of-the-art experimental techniques to quantify 3D microstructural features are utilized, and these aspects are incorporated into a variety of computational methods to facilitate more accurate modeling of both processing-structure and structure-property relationships.

Research Interests

Structural characterization and quantification of structure-property relationships across multiple length scales, statistical analysis of defects and their interactions in polycrystalline materials, and developing inverse design principles for optimizing performance in structural and functional materials

Selected Publications
  • S. Patala and C. A. Schuh, “Representation of Single-axis Grain Boundary Functions,” Acta Materialia, Vol. 61, No. 8, pp. 3068-3081, 2013.
  • S. Patala, L. D. Marks and M. O. de la Cruz, “Elastic Strain Energy Effects in Faceted Decahedral Nanoparticles,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Vol. 117, No. 3, pp. 1485-1494, 2013.
  • S. Patala and C. A. Schuh, “Symmetries in the Representation of Grain Boundary-plane Distributions,” Philosophical Magazine, Vol. 93, No. 5, pp. 524-573, 2013.
  • S. Patala, J. K. Mason and C. A. Schuh, “Improved Representations of Misorientation Information for Grain Boundary Science and Engineering,” Progress in Materials Science, Vol. 57, No. 8, pp. 1383-1425, 2012.
  • S. Patala and C. A. Schuh, “A Continuous and One-to-One Coloring Scheme for Misorientations,” Acta Materialia, Vol. 59, No. 2, pp. 554-562, 2011.

Dr. Katherine SaulKatherine Saul
Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2005), Stanford University

Saul received her Sc.B. in engineering from Brown University. She received her MS and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. She subsequently held a research associate position in the Department of Bioengineering at Stanford. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, she was an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and orthopaedic surgery at the Wake Forest School of Medicine and the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences.

In Saul’s research, she applies mechanical engineering techniques to improve treatment outcomes for neuromusculoskeletal disorders of the upper limb across the lifespan, using both computational dynamic simulation and experimental methods, including imaging, motion capture and functional assessments of musculoskeletal performance. She uses computational simulation of muscle mechanics and the dynamics of functional movement to compare treatment options and predict functional outcomes. She also explores muscle control strategies and movement compensations exhibited by healthy and impaired patients to provide a foundation for clinical practitioners to optimize rehabilitation for their patients. Recently, her work has focused on shoulder dyskinesis due to rotator cuff impairment in older adults and peripheral nerve injury clinical applications.

Research Interests

Dynamics and neural control of the musculoskeletal system, upper-limb biomechanics and orthopaedic rehabilitation, computational dynamic simulation of movement, and musculoskeletal imaging

Selected Publications
  • Crouch DL, Plate JF, Li Zhongyu, Saul KR. “Biomechanical contributions of posterior deltoid and teres minor in the context of axillary nerve injury: a computational study.” Journal of Hand Surgery. 2013; 38(2): 241-249. PMID: 23294649.
  • Vidt ME, Daly M, Miller ME, Davis CC, Marsh AP, Saul KR. “Characterizing upper limb muscle volume and strength in older adults: a comparison with young adults.” Journal of Biomechanics. 2012; 45: 334-41.PMID: 22047782.
  • Saul KR, Hayon S, Smith TL, Tuohy CJ, Mannava S. “Postural dependence of passive tendon in the supraspinatus following rotator cuff repair: a simulation analysis.” Clinical Biomechanics. 2011: 26, 804-810. PMID: 21596463.
  • Holzbaur KRS, Murray WM, Gold GE, Delp SL. “Upper limb muscle volumes in adult subjects.” Journal of Biomechanics. 2007; 40: 742-749. PMID: 17241636.
  • Holzbaur KRS, Murray WM, Delp SL. “A model of the upper extremity for simulating musculoskeletal surgery and analyzing neuromuscular control.” Annals of Biomedical Engineering. 2005; 33: 829-840. PMID: 16078622.

Dr. Tushar SinhaTushar Sinha
Research Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2008), Purdue University

Sinha received his BS in agricultural engineering from Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology in Udaipur, India, and his MS in water resources engineering (civil) from the Indian Institute of Technology in Delhi, India. He received his PhD in hydrology from Purdue University. Before joining the faculty at NC State, Sinha worked as a postdoctoral scientist at Arizona State University and NC State.

Presently he studies the role of land-surface conditions and climate forecasts in developing streamflow forecasts, impacts of climate change and anthropogenic interventions on freshwater sustainability, and impacts of climate variability and change on cold season hydrological processes. His research includes analysis of field observations as well as applications of multiple land-surface models and statistical models. Recent funding sources of his research are the National Science Foundation and the North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute.

Research Interests

Impacts of climate and land use changes on hydrologic cycle, large-scale ocean- atmosphere-land surface interactions to improve streamflow and soil moisture forecasting, and surface water and groundwater sustainability under climate change and human interventions

Selected Publications
  • Sinha, T., and A. Sankarasubramanian (2013), “Role of initial soil moisture conditions and monthly updated climate forecasts in developing operational streamflow forecasts,” Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 17, 1-13, doi:10.5194/hess-17-1-2013.
  • Oludhe, C., A. Sankarasubramanian, T. Sinha, N. Devineni, and U. Lall (2013), “Role of Multimodel Climate Forecasts in Improving Water and Energy Management,” Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, in press, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JAMC-D-12-0300.1.
  • Sinha, T., and K. A. Cherkauer (2010), “Impacts of future climate change on soil frost in the midwestern United States,” Journal of Geophysical Research, 115, D08105, 1-16, doi:10.1029/2009JD012188.
  • Sabo, J. L., T. Sinha, L. Bowling, G. Schoups, K. Cherkauer, P. Fuller, W. Graf, J. Hopmans, J.Kominoski, S. Trimble, W. Wallender, R. Webb, E. Wohl (2010), “Reclaiming sustainable watersheds in the Cadillac Desert,” Proc. of National Acad. of Sci., 107(50), 21263-21269.
  • Sinha, T., K. A. Cherkauer and V. Mishra (2010), “Impacts of historic climate variability on seasonal soil frost in the Midwestern U.S.,” Journal of Hydrometeorology, 11, 229-251.

Binil StarlyDr. Binil Starly
Associate Professor of Regenerative Medicine
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (2011), Drexel University

Starly joined the faculty at NC State in August 2013 as a Chancellor’s Faculty Excellence Program cluster hire in regenerative medicine. He directs the Laboratory for Engineering Biological Tissue Systems engaged in the scale-up automated production of engineered tissue systems for pharmaceutical drug screening, toxicity testing and regenerative medicine applications. As part of the regenerative medicine cluster, his work will involve building production platforms for engineered biological tissue leveraging advances in computer-aided tissue scaffold production, bioprinting, intelligent machines, non-invasive sensors and advanced bioreactors to achieve the goal of “tissue engineering on-demand.”

Starly has received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award for research in multi-scale biological tissue scaffold systems built from additive manufacturing platforms. He has published more than 26 journal publications in the fields of design/manufacturing, customized biomedical implants, biofabrication and tissue engineering. For his contributions, he was awarded the 2011 Society of Manufacturing Engineering Young Manufacturing Engineer Award. He has supervised the research of 15 MS and three PhD students. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses related to engineering mechanics, digitally enabled design and manufacturing and regenerative medicine manufacturing. Starly’s formal education began with a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of Kerala in India and then a PhD in mechanical engineering from Drexel University. He then joined the University of Oklahoma to develop additive manufacturing platforms for tissue engineering.

Research Interests

Automated production of 3D in vitro tissue models, cell expansion-based bioreactors, real-time sensors for biometrology and biomedical applications of additive manufacturing

Selected Publications
  • Lan, S.F., Kehinde T., Zhang X., Schmidtke, D., Khajotia, Sharukh, & Starly, B. (2013) “Controlled Release of Metronidazole from Composite Poly-ε-Caprolactone/Alginate Rings for Dental Implants.” Journal of Dental Materials, 29 (6), 656-659.
  • Lan, S.F., & Starly, B. (2011). “Alginate based 3D Hydrogels as an In Vitro Co-Culture Model Platform for the Toxicity Screening of New Chemical Entities.” Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 256, 62–72.
  • Padmanabhan, T., Kamaraj V., Magwood, L., & Starly, B. (2011). “Experimental Investigation on the Operating Variables of a Near-Field Electrospinning Process via Response Surface Methodology.” Journal of Manufacturing Processes, 13 (2), 104-112.

Dr. Blair D. SullivanBlair D. Sullivan
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2008), Princeton University

Sullivan received her BS degrees in applied mathematics and computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology, supported as a President’s Scholar. She received her PhD in mathematics from Princeton University, where she held a US Department of Homeland Security Graduate Fellowship and Dissertation Grant. During her tenure at Princeton, she also spent time as a visiting researcher at the Renyi Institute in Budapest, Hungary, and held internships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Microsoft Research’s Theory Group in Redmond, Wash. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, she was a computational mathematician in the Computer Science and Mathematics Division at ORNL, where she was principal investigator on grants from the Department of Energy’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, DARPA GRAPHS, and ORNL’s LDRD program.

Sullivan’s recent work focuses on integrating tools and techniques from structural graph theory into tools for scalable network analysis. One focus is on elucidating and utilizing tree-like “intermediate scale” structure in complex networks (e.g., hierarchies in biology, hub nodes in social networks, or hyperbolic routing in the Internet) to enable scalable analysis and expand the types of queries possible on massive graphs. This includes developing new algorithms/implementations for solving optimization problems using tree decompositions and dynamic programming on parallel/HPC architectures, integrating structural graph theory constructs with ideas from hyperbolic geometry to define an intermediate scale “skeleton” for networks, and developing approaches to dimensionality reduction that take advantage of network structure and avoid densification of sparse graph data. She also works on designing measures of graph similarity, and mathematical evaluation of random graph generators to improve network modeling.

Research Interests

Graph algorithms, parallel and high-performance computing, applied structural graph theory, combinatorial scientific computing, and graph embeddings for quantum computing

Selected Publications
  • A. Adcock, B. D. Sullivan, O. Hernandez, and M. Mahoney. “Evaluating OpenMP Tasking at Scale for the Computation of Graph Hyperbolicity.” International Workshop on OpenMP (IWOMP) 2013, to appear.
  • B. D. Sullivan, D. Weerapurage, and C. Groer. “Parallel Algorithms for Graph Optimization using Tree Decompositions.” Proceedings of the International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium Workshops, 2013.
  • C. Groer, B. D. Sullivan, and S. Poole. “A Mathematical Analysis of the R-MAT Random Graph Generator.” Networks, 58(3):159–170, 2011.


Dr. Woongje SungWoongje Sung
Research Assistant Professor
National Science Foundation FREEDM Systems Center
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2012), North Carolina State University

Sung obtained his PhD in 2012 from NC State under the supervision of Drs. Alex Huang and Jay Baliga. He has more than 10 years of industry and academic experience working on the design and fabrication of power semiconductor devices.

Research Interests

The design, fabrication, characterization and analysis of WBG semiconductor (SiC, GaN) devices such as MOSFETs, IGBTs, JFETs, FCDs, BRTs, and JBS, PiN diodes

Selected Publications
  • Sung, W., Van Brunt, E., Baliga, B. J., Huang, A. Q., “A Comparative Study of Gate Structures for 9.4-kV 4H-SiC Normally On Vertical JFETs,” IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices, vol. 59, no. 9, pp. 2417-2423, Sept. 2012.
  • Sung, W, Van Brunt, E., Baliga, B. J., Huang, A.Q., “A New Edge Termination Technique for High-Voltage Devices in 4H-SiC–Multiple-Floating-Zone Junction Termination Extension,” Electron Device Letters, IEEE, vol. 32, no. 7, pp. 880-882, July 2011.
  • Woongje Sung, B. J. Baliga, and A. Q. Huang, “A Novel 4H-SiC Fault Isolation Device with Improved Trade-off between On-state Voltage Drop and Short Circuit SOA,” 2012, Materials Science Forum, 717-720, 1045.
  • Woongje Sung, A. Q. Huang, and B. J. Baliga, “A novel 4H-SiC IGBT structure with improved trade-off between short circuit capability and on-state voltage drop,” Proceedings of ISPSD 2010, pp. 217-220, 6-10, June, 2010.
  • Woongje Sung, Jun Wang, A. Q. Huang, and B. J. Baliga, “Design and investigation of frequency capability of 15kV 4H-SiC IGBT,” Proceedings of ISPSD 2010, pp. 271-274, 14-18, June, 2009.

Dr. Nelson R. Vinueza BenitezNelson R. Vinueza Benitez
Assistant Professor
Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science
PhD (2010), Purdue University

Vinueza’s formal education began with a BS in industrial chemistry and a BS in chemical engineering at El Universidad San Francisco de Quito in Ecuador. He then earned his PhD in physical organic chemistry from Purdue University, under the mentorship of Professor Hilkka Kenttämaa, where he studied the chemical reactivity of carbon-center tri- and tetraradicals as a way to design better cancer drugs.

In 2010, Vinueza was a postdoctoral fellow of the US Department of Energy in the Center of Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels, an Energy Frontiers Research Center at Purdue. During this time, Vinueza’s research focus was the development of new mass spectrometry methods for the analysis of lignin and cellulose degradation products as well as bio-oil.

Research Interests

Development and application of mass spectrometry methods for the analysis and structural characterization of chemicals of forensic interest, such as dyes, inks, fibers, polymers and drugs; and mass spectrometry, organic synthesis and gas-phase ion chemistry are central tools for the lab

Selected Publications
  • Nelson R. Vinueza, Vanessa A. Gallardo, John F. Klimek, Nicholas Carpita and Hilkka I. Kenttämaa. “Analysis of Xyloglucans by Ambient Chloride Attachment Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry.” Carbohydr. Polym. 2013, 98, 1203-1213.
  • Nelson R. Vinueza, Vanessa A. Gallardo, John F. Klimek, Nicholas Carpita and Hilkka I. Kenttämaa. “Analysis of Sugars by Chloride Ion Attachment Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization/Tandem Mass Spectrometry.” Fuel2013, 105, 235-246.
  • Nelson R. Vinueza, Enada F. Archibold, Bartłomiej J. Jankiewicz, Steven C. Habicht, Mohammad S. Aqueel, John J. Nash and Hilkka I. Kenttämaa. “Reactivity of the 4,5–Didehydroisoquinolinium Ion: a σ,σ–Biradical Cation.” Chem. Eur. J. 2012, 18, 8692-8698.
  • Vanessa A. Gallardo, Bartłomiej J. Jankiewicz, Nelson R. Vinueza, John J. Nash and Hilkka I. Kenttämaa. “A Reactivity Study on a 1,2,3,5-Tetradehydrobenzene: the 2,4,6-Tridehydropyridine Radical Cation.” J. Am. Soc. Chem. 2012, 134, 1926-1929.
  • Bartłomiej J. Jankiewicz, Anthony Adeuya, Michael J. Yurkovich, Nelson R. Vinueza, Samuel J. Gardner III, Meng Zhou, John J. Nash, Hilkka I. Kenttämaa. “Reactivity of an Aromatic σ,σ,σ-Triradical: the 2,4,6-Tridehydropyridinium Cation.” Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 9198-9201.

Dr. Wensong YuWensong Yu
Research Associate Professor
National Science Foundation FREEDM Systems Center
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2000), South China University of Technology

Yu received his MS from the Central China University of Science and Technology and his PhD from the South China University of Technology in 1995 and 2000, respectively, both in mechanical and electrical engineering.

From 2006 to 2013, he worked as a postdoctoral researcher, research scientist and research assistant professor at the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech.

He currently studies high-frequency solid-state transformers with an advanced soft-switching technique, ultra high efficiency inverter, high-voltage power conversion, distributed energy storage devices, and green energy grid infrastructure.

Research Interests

Soft-switching power converters, grid-tied inverters, industrial power electronics, and renewable energy power systems

Selected Publications
  • W. Yu, J.S. Lai, W-H Lai, H. Wan, “Hybrid Resonant and PWM Converter With High Efficiency and Full Soft-Switching Range,” IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, vol. 27, no. 12, pp. 4925, 4933, Dec. 2012.
  • W. Yu, J.-S. Lai, H. Ma, and C. Zheng, “High Efficiency DC-DC Converter with Twin-Bus for Dimmable LED Lighting,” IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, vol. 26, no. 8, pp. 2095-2100, Aug. 2011.
  • W. Yu, J.-S. Lai, Q. Hao, C. Hutchens, G. Lisi, and A. Djabbari, “High efficiency MOSFET inverter with H6-type configuration for non-isolated photovoltaic AC module applications,” IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 1253-1260, April 2011.
  • W. Yu, J.S. Lai, and S.-Y. Park, “An Improved Zero-Voltage-Switching Inverter Using Two Coupled Magnetics in One Resonant Pole,” IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 952-961, Apr. 2010.
  • W. Yu, H. Qian, and J.-S. Lai, “Design of High-Efficiency Bidirectional DC-DC Converter and High-Precision Efficiency Measurement,” IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 650-658, Mar. 2010.

Year 2012-13

Dr. Jacob AdamsJacob Adams
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2011), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research Interests

Electrically small, conformal and reconfigurable antennas; novel materials and fabrication techniques for microwave systems; electromagnetic modeling; antenna integration; microwave measurements; and bioelectromagnetics.

Adams received his BS and MS degrees in electrical and computer engineering from Ohio State University in 2005 and 2007, respectively. He received his PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in May 2011. From January 2011 until December 2012, Adams was an Intelligence Community postdoctoral research associate in the Electromagnetics Laboratory at the University of Illinois. He will join the NC State faculty in January 2013.

Adams develops antennas for a variety of applications, including mobile communications, wireless sensors and defense systems. He is also interested in novel materials and fabrication methods for multifunctional, conformal and flexible microwave devices. In addition, Adams studies the application of eigendecomposition techniques to improve antenna modeling and design.

Selected Publications
  • J.J. Adams, E.B. Duoss, T.F. Malkowski, M.J. Motala, B.Y. Ahn, R.G. Nuzzo, J.T. Bernhard, and J.A. Lewis, “Conformal printing of electrically small antennas onto three-dimensional surfaces,” Adv. Mat., vol. 23, no. 11, pp. 1335-1340, 2011 (cover article).
  • J.J. Adams and J.T. Bernhard, “A modal approach to tuning and bandwidth enhancement of an electrically small antenna,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., vol. 59, no. 4, pp. 1085-1092, 2011.
  • J.J. Adams, S.C. Slimmer, T.F. Malkowski, E.B. Duoss, J.A. Lewis, and J.T. Bernhard, “Comparison of spherical antennas fabricated via conformal printing: helix, meanderline, and hybrid designs,” IEEE Antennas Wirel. Propag. Lett., vol. 10, pp. 1425-1428, 2011.
  • J.J. Adams, S.C. Slimmer, J.A. Lewis, and J.T. Bernhard, “Bandwidth limitations, matching, and fabrication of multimode electrically small antennas,” in Proc. 2011 Antenna Appl. Symp., pp. 162-179, Monticello, IL.
  • A. Russo, B.Y. Ahn, J.J. Adams, E.B. Duoss, J.T. Bernhard, and J.A. Lewis, “Pen-on-paper flexible electronics,” Adv. Mat., vol. 23, no. 30, pp. 3426-3430, 2011.

Dr. Tiffany BarnesTiffany Barnes
Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2003), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Educational data mining; serious games for education, health and energy; and broadening participation in computing education and research.

Barnes received her PhD in computer science from NC State in 2003 and also holds BS and MS degrees in computer science and mathematics from the university. She was an associate professor of computer science at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte before joining the NC State faculty in August 2012.

Barnes has served as chair and program chair of the International Conference on Educational Data Mining; chair of the STARS Celebration Conference; and program track chair for the International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games. She has also been associate editor for the Journal of Educational Data Mining and guest editor for the IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications special issue on serious games.

Barnes received an NSF CAREER Award for her novel work in using data and educational data mining to add intelligence to STEM learning environments. She is co-PI and current executive vice president for the STARS Alliance, a consortium of universities that engages college students in outreach, research and service to broaden participation in computing.

Selected Publications
  • Acey Boyce, Antoine Campbell, Shaun Pickford, Dustin Culler, and Tiffany Barnes. 2012. Maximizing learning and guiding behavior in free play user generated content environments. In Proceedings of the 17th ACM annual conference on innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE ’12). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 10-15.
  • John Stamper, Tiffany Barnes, and Marvin Croy (2011). Enhancing the Automatic Generation of Hints with Expert Seeding. International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, Special Issue “Best of ITS,” 2011. IOS Press.
  • S. Finkelstein, A. Nickel, Z. Lipps, T. Barnes, Z. Wartell, E. Suma. (2011). Astrojumper: Motivating exercise with an immersive virtual reality exergame. Presence.
  • Barnes, T. and J. Stamper. (2010). Using Markov decision processes for student problem-solving visualization and automatic hint generation. Handbook on Educational Data Mining. CRC Press.

Dr. Lina BattestilliLina Battestilli
Teaching Assistant Professor,
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2005), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Transformation of datacenter networking to support cloud computing; software defined networking; openflow; techniques and uses of deep packet processing; scale-out architectures; advanced scheduling of network resources; and control and management plane design development.

Battestilli received a BS in electrical engineering with a minor in applied mathematics from Kettering University in 1999. She received her MS in computer networking and a PhD in computer science from NC State in 2002 and 2005, respectively.

Prior to joining the NC State faculty, Battestilli was a network research engineer at Next Generation Computing Systems at IBM Research. She worked on PowerEN Technology, a blur between general purpose and networking processors and hardware accelerators. Battestilli identified and studied workloads at the edge of the network that required high-throughput and fast deep packet processing.

Battestilli is also interested in innovation in computer science education, especially through the use of cloud-computing technology.

Selected Publications
  • Lina Battestilli, Terry Nelms, Steven W. Hunter, Gary Shippy, “High Performing Scale-Out Solution for Deep Packet Processing via Adaptive Load Balancing,”Proceedings of the 18th IEEE Workshop on Local and Metropolitan Area Networks (LANMAN 2011), October 2011, Chapel Hill, NC (best paper award).
  • Lina Battestilli, Gary Shippy, Terry Nelms and Steven W. Hunter, “Load-balancing via Modulus Distribution and TCP Redirection due to Server Overload,” IBM Patent 2010.
  • L. Battestilli, H. Perros, S. Chukova, “Burst Lost Probabilities in a Network with Simultaneous Link Possession: A Single-Node Decomposition Algorithm,” IET Communications, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 441-453, March 2009.
  • Gigi Karmous-Edwards, Arun Viswanath, Douglas Reeves, Lina Battestilli, Priyanka Vegesna, George N. Rouskas, “Edge-Reconfigurable Optical Networks (ERONs): Rationale, Network Design and Evaluation,” IEEE/OSA Journal of Lightwave Technology, vol. 27, no.12, pp. 1837-1845, June 15, 2009.

Dr. Zhen GuZhen Gu
Assistant Professor,
Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering
PhD (2010), University of California, Los Angeles

Research Interests

Controlled drug delivery, bio-inspired materials, implantable biomedical devices and biochip technology.

Gu received his PhD in 2010 with a major in MEMS and nanotechnology from the University of California, Los Angeles, under the guidance of Dr. Yi Tang in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Dr. Yong Chen in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Gu also holds a BS in chemistry and an MS in polymer chemistry and physics from Nanjing University in China.

Prior to joining the Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering, Gu was a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Langer in the David H. Koch Institute of Integrative Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard Medical School. Gu has published 16 peer-reviewed journal papers and has applied for 10 patents. The overall goal of his present studies in the Gu lab is to systematically integrate biomaterials design, biomolecular engineering, and micro/nano-fabrication towards on-demand therapeutics and diagnostics focused on cancer, diabetes and regenerative medicine.

Selected Publications
  • Z. Gu, M. Yan, B. Hu, K. Joo, A. Biswas, Y. Huang, Y. Lu, P. Wang, Y. Tang, “Protein Nanocapsule Weaved with Enzymatically Degradable Polymeric Network” Nano Letters, 12 (4533), 2009.
  • Z. Gu, S. Huang, Y. Chen, “Biomolecular Nanopatterning by Magnetic Electric Lithography” Angewandte Chemie, 48 (952), 2009. (Corresponding Author; Cover Feature)
  • Z. Gu, Y. Tang, “Enzyme-Assisted Photolithography for Spatial Functionalization of Hydrogels” Lab on a Chip, 10 (1946), 2010. (Corresponding Author; Cover Feature)
  • Z. Gu, A. Biswas, M. Zhao, Y. Tang, “Tailoring Nanocarriers for Intracellular Protein Delivery” Chemical Society Reviews, 40 (3638), 2011. (Corresponding Author)
  • A. Biswas, K. Joo, M. Zhao, G. Fan, P. Wang, Z. Gu, Y. Tang, “Endoprotease-mediated Intracellular Protein Delivery Using Nanocapsule” ACS Nano, 5 (1385), 2011. (Corresponding Author).

Dr. Cassie HintzCassie Hintz
Assistant Professor,
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2012), University of Wisconsin-Madison

Research Interests

Asphalt pavement design, multi-scale characterization of asphalt materials, asphalt modification technology, and asphalt pavement distress mechanisms.

Hintz received her BS, MS and PhD degrees in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research is focused on the characterization of asphalt materials with the goal of developing a fundamental understanding of distress mechanisms and factors affecting asphalt pavement behavior.

Specifically, Hintz’s work utilizes multi-scale characterization to improve our understanding of asphalt binders and their interaction with mineral aggregates. The research could lead to improved methods for material selection and asphalt mixture design. Additionally, Hintz investigates asphalt modification technology used to improve pavement durability and sustainability. She joined the faculty at NC State in August 2012.

Selected Publications
  • Hintz, C.; Velasquez, R.; Li, Z.; and Bahia, H. Effect of Oxidative Aging on Binder Fatigue Performance, Journal of the Association of Asphalt Paving Technologists, Vol. 80, 2011, pp. 527-548.
  • Hintz, C.; Velasquez, R.; Johnson, C.; and Bahia, H. Modification and Validation of the Linear Amplitude Sweep Test for Binder Fatigue Specification. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2207, 2011, pp. 99-106.
  • Hintz, C. and A. Vonderohe. Comparison of Earthwork Computation Methods. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2215, 2011, pp. 100-104.
  • Stimili, A.; Hintz, C., Zhijun.; L., Velasquez, R.; and Bahia, H. Effect of Healing on Fatigue Law Parameters of Asphalt Binders, Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. TBD, 2012, pp. TBD.
  • Faheem, A.; Hintz, C.; Bahia, H.; and Al-Qadi, I. Influence of Filler Fractional Voids on Mastic and Mixture Performance, Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. TBD, 2012, pp. TBD.

Dr. Douglas C. HopkinsDouglas C. Hopkins
Research Professor,
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (1989), Virginia Tech

Research Interests

Power electronics and electronic packaging for high-performance electronic energy systems; multi-physics modeling and simulation; topology development; and application of inorganic and organic composite materials for fabrication of ultra high-density, high-temperature circuits and devices.

Hopkins received his BS and MS degrees from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He received his PhD from Virginia Tech, where he pioneered megahertz-frequency switch-mode power sources using highly integrated high-density packaging techniques. Prior to receiving his PhD, Hopkins worked at the General Electric Global Research Center. He has held faculty positions at the State Universities of New York at Binghamton and Buffalo.

Hopkins now directs the Laboratory for Packaging Research in Electronic Energy Systems at NC State. He is a Fellow of the International Microelectronics and Packaging Society and has held invited fellowships at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab, the US Army’s Fort Monmouth, the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field and the Ohio Space Institute. He founded the power electronics packaging technical committees for IEEE-CPMT, IEEE-PELS, IMAPS and the PSMA. He has authored more than 100 journal and conference publications, including many that have won awards. Hopkins joined the NC State faculty in August 2011.

Selected Publications
  • “A MEMS Sensor for Gas Detection in High Voltage Oil Filled Equipment,” Krishna P. Bhat, Douglas C. Hopkins, Kwang Oh, IEEE Trans. on Industry Applications, Sept. 2012.
  • “Extreme Thermal Transient Stress Analysis with Pre-Stress in a Metal Matrix Composite Power Package,” D.C. Hopkins, T. Baltis, J.M. Pitaressi, D.R. Hazelmyer, High Temperature Electronics Conference (HiTEC), Albuquerque, NM, May 8-10, 2012.
  • “Results for an Al/AlN Composite 350C SiC Solid-State Circuit Beaker Module,” K. Bhat, Y.B. Guo, Y. Xu, D.R. Hazelmyer, D.C. Hopkins, IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conf. (APEC), Orlando, FL, Feb 5-9, 2012.
  • “Electromigration Time to Failure of SnAgCuNi Solder Joints,” C. Basaran, S. Li, D.C. Hopkins, and D. Veychard, J. of Applied Physics, 106, 013707 (2009).
  • “A Dynamic Model for a Gas-Liquid Corona Discharge Using Neural Networks,” A. Hosny, D.C. Hopkins, et al, Trans. on Power Engineering, July 2009.

Dr. Michael KudenovMichael Kudenov
Assistant Professor,
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2009), University of Arizona

Research Interests

Developing novel imaging systems, interferometers, detectors, and anisotropic materials related to polarization and spectral sensing; snapshot systems that are capable of maximizing the spatial, spectral, and/or polarimetric information contained within a single image; 3D imaging; and atmospheric monitoring.

Kudenov completed his BS in electrical engineering at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 2005. Upon graduation, his personal interest in astronomy and photography led him to obtain his PhD in optical sciences at the University of Arizona in 2009. Following his PhD, Kudenov remained a postdoctoral researcher and assistant research professor at the university until joining the NC State faculty in August 2012.

While at the University of Arizona, Kudenov’s research included visible and infrared imaging polarimetry, spectroscopy, 3D profilometry, interferometry, and lens design. He has authored 13 journal articles, 15 conference proceedings and one book contribution. He has two pending patents and is in the process of writing a new book on optical instrumentation.

Selected Publications
  • M. Kudenov and E. Dereniak, “Compact real-time birefringent imaging spectrometer,” Opt. Exp. 20, 17973-17986 (2012).
  • M. Kudenov, M. Escuti, N. Hagen, E. Dereniak, and K. Oka, “Snapshot imaging Mueller matrix polarimeter using polarization gratings,” Opt. Lett. 37, 1367-1369 (2012).
  • M. Kudenov, M. Escuti, E. Dereniak, and K. Oka, “White-light channeled imaging polarimeter using broadband polarization gratings,” Appl. Opt. 50, 2283-2293 (2011).
  • M. Kudenov, M. Jungwirth, E. Dereniak, and G. Gerhart, “White-light Sagnac interferometer for snapshot multispectral imaging,” Appl. Opt. 49, 4067-4076 (2010).
  • M.W. Kudenov, J.L. Pezzaniti and G.R. Gerhart, “Microbolometer-infrared imaging Stokes polarimeter,” Opt. Eng. 48, 063201 (2009).

Dr. Mark D. LosegoMark D. Losego
Research Assistant Professor,
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
PhD (2008), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Synthesis of complex materials systems with organic-inorganic interfaces and/or three-dimensional meso-/nano-structuring and understanding their electrical, optical, and thermal properties for renewable energy technologies.

Losego received his BS in materials science and engineering from Penn State University in 2003. He completed both his MS and PhD degrees in materials science and engineering at NC State in 2005 and 2008, respectively. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, Losego was a postdoctoral researcher in the materials science and engineering department at the University of Illinois.

Presently Losego studies how meso-structuring and surface passivation can be used to improve and prolong the performance of photoelectrochemical cells for solar water splitting and hydrogen fuel generation. He also investigates how organic/inorganic interfaces can be engineered to control heat flow for thermoelectric energy harvesting devices. Another area of interest is studying alternative materials for plasmonic applications, including conductive oxides.

Losego’s work is primarily experimental with a focus on chemical synthesis of materials (colloids, polymer brushes and SAMs), atomic layer deposition, electrochemistry, physical vapor deposition methods (sputtering, MBE), and materials characterization.

Selected Publications
  • M.D. Losego, M.E. Grady, N.R. Sottos, D.G. Cahill, and P.V. Braun, “Effects of atomic bonding on heat transport across interfaces.” Nature Materials 11 502 (2012).
  • E.A. Paisley, M.D. Losego, B.E. Gaddy, A.L. Rice, R. Collazo, Z. Sitar, D.L. Irving, and J-P. Maria, “Surfactant-enabled epitaxy through control of growth mode with chemical boundary conditions.” Nature Communications 2 461 (2011).
  • M.D. Losego, J. Guske, A. Efremenko, J-P. Maria, and S. Franzen, “Characterizing the molecular order of phosphonic acid self-assembled monolayers on indium tin oxide surfaces.” Langmuir 27 11883 (2011).
  • L.C.H. Moh, M.D. Losego, and P.V. Braun, “Ellipsometric investigation on the effects of solvent quality on scaling behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate) brushes in the moderate and high density regimes.” Langmuir 27 3698 (2011).
  • M.D. Losego, A.Y. Efremenko, C.L. Rhodes, M.G. Cerruti, S. Franzen, J-P. Maria, “Conductive oxide thin films: Model systems for understanding and controlling surface plasmon resonance.” Journal of Applied Physics 106 024903 (2009).

Dr. Ning LuNing Lu
Associate Professor,
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2002), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Research Interests

Modeling and analyzing power system load behaviors, wide-area energy storage, wind integration, climate impact on power grids, and predictive defense model of the smart grid.

Lu received a BS in electrical engineering from the Harbin Institute of Technology in China and an MS in electric power engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1993 and 1999, respectively. She has more than 18 years of experience in electric power engineering and is a senior member of the IEEE. Lu has authored or co-authored more than 60 publications, including journal articles, conference proceedings and technical reports.

Lu was a senior research engineer with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory from 2003 to 2012. Prior to this position, she was a substation design engineer with the Shenyang Electric Power Survey and Design Institute in China, from 1993 to 1998. Lu will join the faculty at NC State in January 2013.

Selected Publications
  • N Lu. 2012. “An Evaluation of the HVAC Load Potential for Providing Load Balancing Service,” accepted by IEEE Trans. on Smart Grid.
  • N Lu, Y.V. Makarov, and M.R. Weimar. 2010. The Wide-area Energy Management System Phase 2 Final Report. PNNL-19720, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA.
  • N Lu, Q. Li, X. Sun, and M.A. Khaleel. 2006. “The Modeling of a Standalone Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit.” Journal of Power Sources161(2):938-948.
  • N Lu, D.P. Chassin, and S.E. Widergren. 2005. “Modeling Uncertainties in Aggregated Thermostatically Controlled Loads Using a State Queueing Model.” IEEE Transactions on Power Systems 20(2):725-733.
  • N Lu, J.H. Chow, and A.A. Desrochers. 2004. “Pumped-Storage Hydro-Turbine Bidding Strategies in a Competitive Electricity Market.” IEEE Transactions on Power Systems 19(2):834-841.

Dr. David LubkemanDavid Lubkeman
Research Professor,
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (1983), Purdue University

Research Interests

Electric power distribution system analysis, distribution automation, distribution management systems, microgrid applications, and equipment asset management.

Lubkeman holds a PhD in electrical engineering from Purdue University with an emphasis in power systems engineering. He has MS and BS degrees in electrical engineering, also from Purdue.

Lubkeman has more than 25 years of experience in distribution systems and automation and has been an active participant in technical development activities, resulting in more than 40 publications and 13 US patents. His previous industry experience includes working at Sensus as a senior product manager for distribution automation; at KEMA consulting in the areas of smart grid business case analysis, large-scale energy storage and renewable energy integration; and at ABB, where he was involved in the development of solutions for distribution automation and asset management. Lubkeman’s prior academic experience was as an associate professor in the Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Clemson University. He is also a licensed professional engineer.

Lubkeman is currently a lead instructor with the Electric Power Systems Engineering (EPSE) Master of Science professional degree program. He also is a research faculty member associated with the NSF FREEDM Systems Center.

Selected Publications
  • Pan, J.; Wang, Z.; Lubkeman, D.; “Condition Based Failure Rate Modeling for Electric Network Components,” IEEE PES Power Systems Conference and Exposition 2009 Conference Proceedings.
  • Pahwa, A.; Xiaoming Feng; Lubkeman, D.; “Performance Evaluation of Electric Distribution Utilities Based on Data Envelopment Analysis,” IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, Volume 18, Issue 1, Feb. 2003, Pages:400-405.
  • US Patent 7,010,437: Electric utility storm outage management.
  • US Patent 7,751,166: Advanced feeder architecture with automated power restoration.
  • US Patents 7,725,295 and 7,672,812: Cable fault detection.

Dr. Venkateswaran (Venkat) NarayanaswamyVenkateswaran (Venkat) Narayanaswamy
Assistant Professor,
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2010), University of Texas at Austin

Research Interests

High-speed flow physics and control; development of plasma-based flow control actuators; development of laser diagnostic techniques; and turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows.

Narayanaswamy received his B. Tech in aerospace engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras in 2004. He pursued his doctoral research at the University of Texas at Austin and received his PhD in 2010. Narayanaswamy continued as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas until 2011. He subsequently spent an additional year as a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Combustion Technology at RWTH Aachen University in Germany before joining the NC State faculty in September 2012.

Narayanaswamy studies the physics of high-speed flows with an emphasis on the interaction between shock waves and flow turbulence. His research also involves developing novel plasma-based actuators to control different canonical flows, which find applications in energy and transportation. Narayanaswamy also studies the complex interactions between the chemistry and flow turbulence that occurs in several practical combustors such as gas turbines, furnaces and automobile engines. He develops new laser-based diagnostic techniques to probe this interaction and aid in the development of the next generation high-efficiency, emission-free combustors.

Selected Publications
  • Narayanaswamy, V., Raja, L.L., and Clemens, N.T., “Control of unsteadiness of a shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction by using a pulsed-plasma jet actuator,” Physics of Fluids, Vol. 24, 076101-22, 2012.
  • Narayanaswamy, V., Raja, L.L., and Clemens, N.T., “Control of a shock/boundary layer interaction by using a pulsed plasma jet actuator,” AIAA Journal, Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 246-249, 2012.
  • Narayanaswamy, V., Raja, L.L., and Clemens, N.T., “Method for acquiring pressure measurements in presence of plasma induced interference for supersonic flow control applications,” Measurement Science and Technology, Vol. 22, p. 125107 (11 pages), 2011.

Dr. Mark PankowMark Pankow
Assistant Professor,
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2010), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Research Interests

Composite materials, especially woven composite materials; ballistic, blast and other high rates of loading with experimental validation; and finite element modeling of composite systems including rate-dependent properties.

Pankow earned his BS in mechanical engineering from California Polytechnic State University in 2005. In 2007 he received an MSE in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan, where he continued his education and received his PhD in 2010. After graduating, Pankow started his position as a postdoctoral researcher at the US Army Research Laboratory in Aberdeen, Md.

Pankow’s research looks at understanding composite materials under high rates of loading. Many of the applications for composite materials are in extreme environments in which ballistic, blast and high-speed impact will be the main design consideration. Understanding how these materials respond in these environments will help his research group better design for numerous applications, taking full advantage of weight savings. Using controlled tests, the group can understand how these materials behave through high-speed diagnostics and in-situ full field measurements. These observations can then be validated through means of theory or detailed finite element modeling to verify the results.

Selected Publications
  • M. Pankow, A. Salvi, A.M. Waas, C.F. Yen, and S. Ghiorse, “Split Hopkinson pressure bar testing of 3D woven composites.” Composites Science and Technology, 71(9):1196-1208, 2011.
  • M. Pankow, A.M. Waas, C.F. Yen, and S. Ghiorse, “Shock loading of 3D woven composites: A validated finite element investigation.” Composite Structures, 93(5):1347-1362, 2011.
  • M. Pankow, B. Justusson, A. Salvi, A.M. Waas, C.F. Yen, and S. Ghiorse, “Shock response of 3D woven composites: An experimental investigation.” Composite Structures, 93(5):1337-1346, 2011.
  • M. Pankow, A.M. Waas, C.F. Yen, and S. Ghiorse, “Resistance to delamination of 3D woven textile composites evaluated using end notch flexure (enf) tests: Cohesive zone based computational results.” Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, 42(12):1863-1872, 2011.

Dr. David S. RickettsDavid S. Ricketts
Associate Professor,
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2006), Harvard University

Research Interests

Micro- and nano-integrated circuits, systems and devices for analog and high-speed applications.

Ricketts received his PhD in engineering and applied sciences from Harvard University and his BS and MS degrees in electrical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Prior to joining academia, he spent eight years in industry developing more than 40 integrated circuits in mixed-signal, RF and power management applications. Ricketts’ research crosses the fields of physics, materials science and circuit design, investigating the ultimate capabilities of microelectronic devices and how these devices are harnessed by differing circuit topologies to produce the highest performing systems.

Selected Publications
  • D. Arumugam, J. Griffin, D. Stancil and D.S. Ricketts, “2-Dimensional Position Tracking using Magnetoquasistatic Fields,” Int. Conf. on Electromagnetics in Advanced Applications, Sept. 2011.
  • D.S. Ricketts, J.A. Bain, Y. Luo, S. Blanton, K. Mai and G.K. Fedder, “Enhancing CMOS using nanoelectronic devices, a perspective on hybrid integrated systems,” Proc. of the IEEE, Nov. 2010.
  • D.S. Ricketts, X. Li, and D. Ham, “Electrical Soliton Oscillator,” IEEE Trans. on Microwave Theory and Tech., vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 373-382, Jan. 2006.
  • R.S. Friedman, M.C. McAlpine, D.S. Ricketts, D. Ham, C.M. Lieber, “High-speed integrated nanowire circuits,” Nature, vol. 434, p.1085, Apr. 2005.

Dr. Erik E. SantisoErik E. Santiso
Assistant Professor,
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
PhD (2007), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Computer-based approaches for the automatic discovery of new materials and chemicals; molecular modeling of solids and structured fluids; and crystallization.

Santiso received his BS and MS degrees in chemical engineering from La Universidad Simón Bolívar in Caracas, Venezuela, where he worked as an assistant professor. He received his PhD in chemical engineering from NC State and later was a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Santiso was a research associate at the Centre for Process Systems Engineering at Imperial College London in the United Kingdom and an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NC State. He will join the NC State faculty in January 2013.

Currently Santiso is developing new methods to discover new materials and chemicals using computer simulation methods. Some of the applications considered are the development of new surfactants for carbon dioxide capture, the discovery of new synthetic biomimetic polymers, the development of oxygen carriers for chemical looping, and the design of adsorption media for difficult separations. Santiso also studies the mechanisms by which order arises in solids and structured fluids.

Selected Publications
  • A. Centrone, E.E. Santiso, T.A. Hatton, “Separation of Chemical Reaction Intermediates by Metal-Organic Frameworks,” Small 7, 2356 (2011).
  • E.E. Santiso, L. Huang, K.E. Gubbins, M.K. Kostov, A.M. George, M.B. Nardelli, “Ab Initio Simulations of Chemical Reactions in Nanostructured Carbon Materials,” in Quantum Chemical Calculations of Surfaces and Interfaces of Materials, V.A. Basiu, P. Ugliengo (Eds.), American Scientific Publishers (2010).
  • S. Paul, E.E. Santiso, M.B. Nardelli, “Sequestration and Selective Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide on Graphene Edges,” J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 21, 355008 (2009).
  • E.E. Santiso, M.B. Nardelli, K.E. Gubbins, “A Remarkable Shape-Catalytic Effect of Confinement on the Rotational Isomerization of Small Hydrocarbons,” J. Chem. Phys. 128, 034704 (2008).

Wenqiao (Wayne) Yuan
Associate ProfessorDr. Wenqiao (Wayne) Yuan
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering
PhD (2005), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research Interests

Microalgae culture and bioprocessing, artificial photosynthesis and bioseparation, biomass thermochemical conversion and product separation/upgrading, microbial fuel cell, and biodiesel quality control and utilization.

Yuan received his BS and MS degrees in mechanical engineering from China Agricultural University and a PhD in biological and agricultural engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, Yuan was an associate professor in the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering at Kansas State University.

Presently Yuan studies bioenergy and bioproducts. His primary research focuses on issues and needs related to biological/engineering systems that produce, process or utilize agricultural commodities and other biologically-based materials for energy and value-added products. Yuan’s goal is to discover and promote the use of next-generation, clean energy and renewable products for a sustainable future.

Selected Publications
  • Zhang, W., W. Yuan, X. Zhang, M. Coronado. 2012. Predicting the dynamic and kinematic viscosities of biodiesel-diesel blends using mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy. Applied Energy 98:122-127.
  • Zhang, K., L. Johnson, R. Nelson, W. Yuan, Z. Pei, and D. Wang. 2012. Chemical and elemental composition of big bluestem as affected by ecotype and planting location along the precipitation gradient of the Great Plains. Industrial Crops and Products 40:210-218.
  • Chaichalerm, S., P. Pokethitiyook, W. Yuan, M. Meetam, K. Sirthong, W. Pugkaew, K. Kungvansaichol, M. Kruatrachue, P. Damrongphol. 2011. Culture of microalgal strains isolated from natural habitats in Thailand in various enriched media. Applied Energy 89:296-302.
  • Shen, Y., W. Yuan, Z. Pei, and E. Mao. 2010. Heterotrophic culture of Chlorella protothecoides in various nitrogen sources for lipid production. Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (160):1674-1684.

Year 2011-12

Dr. Randy AventRandy Avent
Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (1986), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Research Interests

Semi-structured analytics and mathematical decision sciences, signal processing, and dynamic probabilistic systems analysis of complex systems.

Avent received his BS in zoology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1980. He received an MS in electrical engineering from NC State in 1986 and his MS and PhD degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill in biomedical engineering and mathematics in 1984 and 1986, respectively. He is a graduate of the Boston Executive Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management. Prior to joining NC State’s faculty, he was the chief scientist in the Defense Department’s Office of Basic Research and the associate chief technology officer at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory (LL).

Avent has a broad range of interests and has done research in many areas, including computer science, life sciences and electrical engineering. The majority of his work, however, has been in defense. He has held several leadership and principal investigator positions at MIT/LL and has been an influential figure in radar signal processing and data analytics for national security applications. He made significant contributions to the field of automatic target recognition for both stationary and moving vehicles. He was responsible for early work in context inclusion and developed the concept of using patterns of life analysis for persistent sensing. He started two new research groups at MIT/LL that addressed key issues in analytics, data fusion, visualization and airborne communications and networking.

Selected Publications
  • Avent, R., “Basic Research in Nanotechnology,” Conference on Nanoelectronic Devices for Defense and Security, September 28, 2009.
  • Avent, R., “Synthetic Aperture Radar: Fundamentals and Applications,” IEEE MTT-S International, June 2005.
  • Avent, R., “A Multi-sensor Architecture for Detecting High-Value Mobile Targets,” SIAM, March 2002.
  • McKellips, A., M. McClure, M. Chu and R. Avent, “Target Classification Using Spatially Flexible Directed Pursuits,” Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 4050, 2000.
  • Avent, R., and G. Benitz, “Interior Imaging Based on High-Definition Vector Imaging,” Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 3575, 1998.

Dr. Chase BeiselChase Beisel
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
PhD (2009), California Institute of Technology

Research Interests

Synthetic biology, systems biology, RNA engineering and microbial metabolic engineering.

Beisel received his BS in chemical engineering from Iowa State University with minors in mathematics and biochemistry. He then received his PhD in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology with a biology minor. Beisel was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health before starting his faculty position at NC State.

Beisel studies the underlying genetic architecture of decision-making in bacteria and how this architecture can be altered to control cellular behavior. He specifically focuses on the roles that regulatory RNAs play in these processes. Beisel is interested in elucidating design principles underlying genetic networks of regulatory RNAs and engineering these networks to address emerging challenges in health and sustainability.

Selected Publications
  • Beisel, C.L. and Storz, G. The base pairing RNA Spot 42 participates in a multi-output feedforward loop to help enact catabolite repression in Escherichia coli. Mol Cell 2011 41:1-12.
  • Beisel, C.L. and Storz, G. Base pairing small RNAs and their roles in global regulatory networks. FEMS Microbiol Rev 2010 34(5):866-82.
  • Beisel, C.L., Chen, Y.Y., Culler, S.J., Hoff, K.G., Smolke, C.D. Design of small molecule-responsive microRNAs based on structural requirements for Drosha processing. Nucleic Acids Res 2010 doi: 10.1093/nar/gkq954.
  • Beisel, C.L. and Smolke, C.D. Design principles for riboswitch function. PLoS Comput Biol 2009 5(4):e1000363.
  • Beisel, C.L., Bayer, T.S., Hoff, K.G., Smolke, C.D. Model-guided design of ligand-regulated RNAi for programmable control of gene expression. Mol Syst Biol 2008 4:224.

Dr. Alexander BogdanovichAlexander Bogdanovich
Research Professor
Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science
Dr. Sci. (1987), Kazan State University, Russia

Research Interests

Textile composites, nanocomposites, computational modeling and finite element analysis, solid mechanics, structural dynamics, impact and blast, and damage and fracture mechanics.

Bogdanovich received his MS in physics from Latvian State University in Riga, Latvia, in 1972 and his PhD in solid mechanics from the Latvian Academy of Sciences, also in Riga, in 1975. Prior to his present employment with NC State, which began in July 2011, Bogdanovich was vice president for research and development at 3TEX, Inc., which is located in Cary, NC. He held this position from 1998 to 2011. Bogdanovich was a senior research scientist in AdTech Systems Research, Inc. in Dayton, Ohio, from 1995 to 1998 and a research associate professor with NC State from 1991 to 1995. He also held positions of increasing responsibility at the Institute of Polymer Mechanics at the Latvian Academy of Sciences. He was a junior research scientist from 1975 to 1978, a senior research scientist from 1978 to 1986, and a deputy director for research from 1986 to 1990.

Bogdanovich has received numerous awards and recognition for his research work. He placed first in the Outstanding Paper Awards category at the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering conferences in 2003 and 2006 and received the Friedrich Tsander Memorial Award for Best Research in Physico-Mathematical and Technical Sciences from the Latvian Academy of Sciences in 1987.

Presently he studies three-dimensional fabric preforms and their composites and carbon nanotube textiles and their composites. He also develops and applies multi-scale computational modeling and 3D analysis methods for predicting static, dynamic, damage and fracture properties and the behavior of composite materials and structures.

Selected Publications
  • Bogdanovich, A. E. and Mohamed, M. H., “Three-dimensional reinforcements for composites.” SAMPE J. 2009, Vol. 45, No. 6, 8-28.
  • Bogdanovich, A. E., “Multi-scale modeling, stress and failure analyses of 3-D woven composites.” J. of Materials Science. 2006, Vol. 41, No. 20, 6547-6590.
  • Bogdanovich, A. E. and Pastore, C. M., Mechanics of Textile and Laminated Composities, Chapman & Hall, London, 1996.
  • Bogdanovich, A. E., Non-linear Dynamic Problems for Composite Cylindrical Shells, Elsevier, London, 1993.

Dr. Igor A. BolotnovIgor A. Bolotnov
Assistant Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
PhD (2008), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Research Interests

Direct numerical simulation of single and multiphase turbulent flows and development of closure laws for modeling of these flows; application of various flow modeling approaches to nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics problems; and spectral models development for multiphase turbulence.

Bolotnov received his BS in applied mathematics and informatics from Bashkir State University in Ufa, Russia. He received his MS and PhD degrees in engineering physics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he worked as a postdoctoral research associate at RPI.

Presently he studies multiphase flows, primarily in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics applications. Numerical simulations of those flows at different scales are of particular interest. Direct numerical simulation of bubble interactions with turbulence, interface tracking and development of new computational fluid dynamics models using high performance computing is one of his research areas. Phenomenological understanding of boiling phenomena, two-phase flow heat transfer and different flow regimes is another integral part of his research.

Selected Publications
  • “Detached Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Two-phase Bubbly Channel Flow,” I.A. Bolotnov, K.E. Jansen, D.A. Drew, A.A. Oberai, R.T. Lahey, Jr. and M.Z. Podowski, Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 37, 647-659 (2011).
  • “Spectral Analysis of Turbulence Based on the DNS of a Channel Flow,” I.A. Bolotnov, R.T. Lahey, Jr., D.A. Drew, K.E. Jansen and A.A. Oberai, Computers & Fluids, 39, 640-655 (2010).
  • “Multiscale Computer Simulation of Fission Gas Discharge during Loss-of-Flow Accident in Sodium Fast Reactor,” I.A. Bolotnov, F. Behafarid, D. Shaver, T. Guo, S. Wang, S.P. Antal, K.E. Jansen, R. Samulyak, H. Wei, M.Z. Podowski, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency & IAEA Workshop (CFD4NRS-3) Experimental Validation and Application of CFD and CMFD Codes to Nuclear Reactor Safety Issues, Washington D.C., USA, 14–16 September 2010.
  • Jansen, R. Samulyak, H. Wei, M.Z. Podowski, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency & IAEA Workshop (CFD4NRS-3) Experimental Validation and Application of CFD and CMFD Codes to Nuclear Reactor Safety Issues, Washington D.C., USA, 14–16 September 2010.
  • “Two Phase Cross Jet in a Fuel Rod Assembly Using DNS/Level-Set Method,” F. Behafarid, I.A. Bolotnov, M.Z. Podowski and K.E. Jansen, 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF-2010), Tampa, FL, May 30 – June 4, 2010.

Dr. Kristy BoyerKristy Boyer
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2010), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, natural language dialogue systems and advanced learning technologies.

Boyer’s research focuses on advancing the state-of-the-art in natural language tutorial dialogue systems by leveraging data-driven approaches. She holds a BS in mathematics and computer science from Valdosta State University, an MS in applied statistics from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and a PhD in computer science from NC State.

Selected Publications
  • Investigating the Relationship Between Dialogue Structure and Tutoring Effectiveness: A Hidden Markov Modeling Approach. Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Robert Phillips, Amy Ingram, Eun Young Ha, Michael D. Wallis, Mladen A. Vouk, and James C. Lester. To appear in the International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education (IJAIED), 2011.
  • The Impact of Task-Oriented Feature Sets on HMMs for Dialogue Modeling. Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Eun Young Ha, Robert Phillips, and James Lester. Proceedings of the 12th Annual SIGdial meeting on Discourse and Dialogue, Portland, Oregon, 2011, 49-58.
  • An Affect-Enriched Dialogue Act Classification Model for Task-Oriented Dialogue. Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Joseph Grafsgaard, Eun Young Ha, Robert Phillips, and James Lester. Proceedings of the 49th Annual Meeting of the Association of Computational Linguistics Human Language Technologies Conference, Portland, Oregon, 2011, 1190-1199.
  • Investigating the Role of Motivation in Computer Science Education through One-on-One Tutoring. Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Robert Phillips, Michael D. Wallis, Mladen A. Vouk, and James C. Lester. Computer Science Education, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2009, 111-136.
  • The Influence of Learner Characteristics on Task-Oriented Tutorial Dialogue. Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Mladen A. Vouk, James C. Lester. Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED ‘07), Marina Del Rey, California, 2007, (Best Student Paper Award) 365-372.

Dr. Linyou CaoLinyou Cao
Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2010), Stanford University

Research Interests

Plasmonics and semiconductor nanophotonics, nanoscale optoelectronic devices, charge dynamics in nanostructures, nanoscale photocatalysis and high-resolution chemical imaging.

Cao received his BS in chemistry from Fudan University and his MS from Peking University before coming to the United States. He received his PhD from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. His recognitions include the Miller Research Fellowship at UC Berkeley, the Kavli Nanoscience Institute Prize Postdoctoral Fellowship at Caltech, and the ACS Division Inorganic Chemistry Young Investigator Award.

Cao’s research interests include better understanding the fundamental properties of photons and charge carriers in nanostructured materials, and eventually translating this fundamental understanding into powerful predictive tools for rational design of novel photonic devices with applications in a wide variety of fields, ranging from energy utilization and environment remediation to information technology and biotechnology.

Selected Publications
  • L. Cao and M. L. Brongersma, “Active plasmonics: Ultrafast developments,” Nature Photonics, vol. 3, pp. 12-13, Jan 2009.
  • L. Y. Cao, P. Y. Fan, E. S. Barnard, A. M. Brown, and M. L. Brongersma, “Tuning the color of silicon nanostructures,” Nano Letters, vol. 10, pp. 2649-2654, Jul 2010.
  • L. Y. Cao, P. Y. Fan, A. P. Vasudev, J. S. White, Z. F. Yu, W. S. Cai, J. A. Schuller, S. H. Fan, and M. L. Brongersma, “Semiconductor nanowire optical antenna solar absorbers,” Nano Letters, vol. 10, pp. 439-445, Feb 2010.
  • L. Y. Cao, B. Nabet, and J. E. Spanier, “Enhanced raman scattering from individual semiconductor nanocones and nanowires,” Physical Review Letters, vol. 96, Apr 21 2006.
  • L. Y. Cao, J. S. White, J. S. Park, J. A. Schuller, B. M. Clemens, and M. L. Brongersma, “Engineering light absorption in semiconductor nanowire devices,” Nature Materials, vol. 8, pp. 643-647, Aug 2009.

Dr. Chih-Hao ChangChih-Hao Chang
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2008), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests

Design and fabrication of multifunctional nanostructured materials, optical properties of subwavelength structures, and nanomanufacturing using lithography and self-assembly processes.

Chang received his BS in mechanical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2002. He received his MS and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2004 and 2008, respectively. After graduation, Chang was a postdoctoral research associate at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Centre in Singapore for one year before returning to MIT to finish his postdoctoral work.

Presently he studies the optical and wetting behaviors of high aspect-ratio nanoscale cone structures, demonstrating glass with anti-glare and self-cleaning properties. Chang also works on the integration of nanomaterials on diffractive optics, resulting in energy-efficient hierarchical nano/microstructures. At the same time, he also develops novel nanofabrication techniques, focusing on processes that are scalable for manufacturing.

Selected Publications
  • C.-H. Chang, L. Tian, W. Hesse, H. Gao, H. J. Choi, M. Siddiqui, and G. Barbastathis, “From 2-dimensional self-assembly to 3-dimensional nanolithography,” Nano Lett., 11(6), 2533–2537 (2011).
  • C.-H. Chang, J. A. Dominguez-Caballero, H. J. Choi, and G. Barbastathis, “Nanostructured gradient-index antireflection diffractive optics,” Opt. Lett., 36, 2354-2356 (2011).
  • C.-H. Chang, H. J. In, S. Takahashi, M. Deterre, H. J. Choi, K. W. Gotrik, and G. Barbastathis, “Assembling Nanoparticle Catalysts with Nanospheres for Periodic Carbon Nanotube Structure Growth,” Nanotechnology, 22, 035301 (2011).
  • C.-H. Chang, L. Waller, and G. Barbastathis, “Design and optimization of broadband wide-angle antireflection structures for binary diffractive optics,” Opt. Lett., 35, 907-909 (2010).
  • C.-H. Chang, C.-W. Tan, J. Miao, and G. Barbastathis, “Self-assembled ferrofluid lithography: patterning micro and nanostructures by controlling magnetic nanoparticles,” Nanotechnology, 20, 495301 (2009).

Dr. Ramón R. CollazoRamón R. Collazo
Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2002), North Carolina State University

Optoelectronic/power materials and devices; III-N wide bandgap semiconductors; polar materials, including nitrides and oxides; materials optical characterization and nonlinear optics.

Collazo received his BS in physics from the University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, and has been involved in growth and characterization of wide band gap semiconductor thin films, especially nitrides and diamond, for the past 11 years. He has been particularly involved in developing a process for controlling the polarity in III-nitrides to develop lateral polarity homojunctions along with their application to the first lateral p/n junction.

Additionally, he has been involved in the development of AlN bulk single crystal substrates, their surface preparation, and further epitaxial thin film deposition for optoelectronics and power device applications. He was awarded the Facundo Bueso Medal for Physics and has authored more than 60 publications and given presentations at national and international conferences.

Selected Publications
  • R. Dalmau, B. Moody, R. Schlesser, S. Mita, J. Xie, M. Feneberg, B. Neuschl, K. Thonke, R. Collazo, A. Rice, J. Tweedie, and Z. Sitar, “Growth and characterization of AlN and AlGaN epitaxial films on AlN single crystal substrates,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, vol. 158, pp. H530-H535, 2011.
  • S. Mita, R. Collazo, A. Rice, R. F. Dalmau, and Z. Sitar, “Influence of gallium supersaturation on the properties of GaN grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 104, Jul 1 2008.
  • S. Mita, R. Collazo, and Z. Sitar, “Fabrication of a GaN lateral polarity junction by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition,” Journal of Crystal Growth, vol. 311, pp. 3044-3048, May 1 2009.
  • A. Rice, R. Collazo, J. Tweedie, R. Dalmau, S. Mita, J. Xie, and Z. Sitar, “Surface preparation and homoepitaxial deposition of AlN on (0001)-oriented AlN substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 108, Aug 15 2010.
  • A. Rice, R. Collazo, J. Tweedie, J. Xie, S. Mita, and Z. Sitar, “Linear dependency of Al-mole fraction with group-III precursor flows in AlxGa1-xN (0 <= x <= 1) deposition by LP OMVPE,” Journal of Crystal Growth, vol. 312, pp. 1321-1324, Apr 1 2010.

Dr. Elizabeth C. DickeyElizabeth C. Dickey
Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (1997), Northwestern University

Point-defect equilibrium and transport in metal oxides, grain boundary and interfacial phenomena, nanomaterials, ceramic composites, and electron microscopy.

Dickey received her BS in materials engineering from the University of Kentucky and her PhD in materials science and engineering from Northwestern University under an NSF graduate research fellowship. Her academic and research interests include functional oxide ceramics, interface materials science, high-temperature ceramic composites and nanomaterials. Common to these research programs is quantitative structural and chemical analysis from the micrometer to atomic length scales.

Dickey has more than 100 peer-reviewed publications. She was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for her work on metal-ceramic interfaces in 1999 and became a Fellow of the American Ceramic Society in 2010. She has held several leadership positions within the American Ceramic Society, including the Chair of the Basic Sciences Division. She served as an editor for Microscopy and Microanalysis and is currently an associate editor for the Journal of the American Ceramic Society.

Selected Publications
  • R.M. White, J.M. Kunkle, A.V. Polotai, E.C. Dickey, “Microstructure and hardness scaling in laser-processed B4C-TiB2 eutectic ceramics,” Journal of the European Ceramic Society, vol. 31, pp. 1227–1232, 2011.
  • J. Li, B. D. Gauntt, and E. C. Dickey, “Microtwinning in highly nonstoichiometric VOx thin films,” Acta Materialia, vol. 58, pp. 5009-5014, Sep 2010.
  • X. Li, M. W. Finnis, J. He, R. K. Behera, S. R. Phillpot, S. B. Sinnott, and E. C. Dickey, “Energetics of charged point defects in rutile TiO2 by density functional theory,” Acta Materialia, vol. 57, pp. 5882-5891, 2009.
  • J. D. Sloppy, D. D. Macdonald, and E. C. Dickey, “Growth laws of bilayer anodized tantalum oxide films formed in phosphoric acid,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, vol. 157, pp. C157-C165, 2010.
  • X. Weng, W. Tian, D. G. Schlom, and E. C. Dickey, “Structure and chemistry of the (111)Sc2O3/(0001) GaN epitaxial interface,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 96, Jun 14 2010.

Dr. William EnckWilliam Enck
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2011), Pennsylvania State University

The design, optimization and measurement of security for operating systems, specifically on mobile phones, and the complex environments in which they operate.

Enck received his BS in computer engineering from Pennsylvania State University in 2004. He received his MS and PhD degrees in computer science and engineering in 2006 and 2011, respectively. His current research focuses on security concerns of smartphones and their applications. This work has been featured by many national and international press outlets.

Enck’s research interests more broadly cover systems security. His past research efforts have included telecommunications security, access control mechanisms in operating systems, hardware security, voting systems security, network security, and large-scale network configuration.

Selected Publications
  • William Enck, Damien Octeau, Patrick McDaniel, and Swarat Chaudhuri. A Study of Android Application Security. Proceedings of the 20th USENIX Security Symposium, August 2011.
  • William Enck, Peter Gilbert, Byung-Gon Chun, Landon P. Cox , Jaeyeon Jung, Patrick McDaniel, and Anmol N. Sheth. TaintDroid: An Information-Flow Tracking System for Realtime Privacy Monitoring on Smartphones. Proceedings of the 9th USENIX Symposium on Operating Systems Design and Implementation (OSDI), October 2010.
  • William Enck, Machigar Ongtang, and Patrick McDaniel. On Lightweight Mobile Phone Application Certification. Proceedings of the 16th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), November 2009.
  • William Enck, Patrick McDaniel, Subhabrata Sen, Panagiotis Sebos, Sylke Spoerel, Albert Greenberg, Sanjay Rao, and William Aiello. Configuration Management at Massive Scale: System Design and Experience. Proceedings of the USENIX Annual Technical Conference, June 2007.
  • William Enck, Patrick Traynor, Patrick McDaniel, and Thomas La Porta. Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks. Proceedings of the 12th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), November 2005.

Dr. Michael C. FlickingerMichael C. Flickinger
Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
PhD (1977), University of Wisconsin-Madison

Research Interests

Industrial biocatalysis, biocatalytic coatings, advanced biocatalytic or photoreactive soft materials, biochemical reactor design and microbial biocatalysis of single carbon compounds.

Flickinger earned his BS in biochemistry and his MS and PhD degrees in pharmaceutical biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was a postdoctoral researcher at the Laboratory for Renewable Resources Engineering in the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. He then became fermentation program director at the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Frederick Cancer Research Center.

While at NCI, Flickinger supervised anti-tumor drug discovery and development, which included process development and scale-up for cGMP (current Good Manufacturing Practice) manufacture of anti-cancer antibiotics, therapeutic enzymes, experimental biologics and large scale tumor viruses for fundamental studies and pre-clinical and human clinical trials. In 1985, he was named founding director of the University of Minnesota’s Institute for Advanced Studies in Biological Process Technology. In addition to teaching at Minnesota, he trained more than 30 graduate students and was co-editor of the Encyclopedia of Bioprocess Technology: Fermentation, Biocatalysis and Bioseparation.

In 2007, Flickinger came to NC State as the associate director for academic programs at the Golden LEAF Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center (BTEC). This past spring he transferred his tenured faculty appointment from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences to the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (CBE) in the College of Engineering. In addition to supervising CBE graduate students, he teaches both CHE and BTEC undergraduate and graduate courses, is director of the new Master of Biomanufacturing Graduate Program and is editor-in-chief of the international Encyclopedia of Industrial Biotechnology. Flickinger was elected a Fellow of the American Chemical Society in 2009, becoming the first faculty member at NC State so named.

Selected Publications
  • Fidaleo, M. & Flickinger, M.C., 2011, “Engineering and Modeling of Thin Adhesive Microbial Biocatalytic Coatings for High Intensity Oxidations in Multi-Phase Microchannel Bioreactors” Chem. Eng. Sci. 66: 3251-3257.
  • Gosse, J.L., B.J. Engel, J C-H Hui, C.S. Harwood & M.C. Flickinger, 2010, “Progress Toward a Biomimetic “Leaf”: Coating-Stabilized Nongrowing Photosynthetic Rhodopseudomonas palustris Produces Hydrogen Gas Continuously for Over 4,000 Hours” Biotechnol. Prog. 26: 907-918.

Dr. Andrew GrieshopAndrew Grieshop
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2008), Carnegie Mellon University

Research Interests

Sources and evolution of atmospheric aerosols, characterization of in-use emissions from mobile and stationary combustion sources, linkages between air pollution emissions and climate change, air pollution exposure assessment, technical policy analysis of the environmental impacts of energy systems, and energy and environment in developing countries.

Grieshop received his BS in mechanical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley and his MS in mechanical engineering and PhD in mechanical engineering and engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University, where he was a member of the multidisciplinary Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies. He was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability and the Liu Institute for Global Issues at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia.

His research focuses on interactions between energy use and the environment and more specifically on improving our technical understanding of the emission and atmospheric transformations of air pollutants. This work aims to inform effective policies to improve air quality and mitigate climate impacts in both developed and developing countries. Current research includes a collaborative project to quantify the emission, indoor concentration, and health and climate impacts of a cookstove replacement program in rural India and a project to characterize the particulate matter emitted by heavy-duty natural gas engines. His work integrates laboratory-and field-based experimentation with modeling and policy analysis efforts to address environmental problems. Grieshop will join the NC State faculty in January 2012.

Selected Publications
  • Grieshop, A. P., Lipsky, E. M., Pekney, N. J., Takahama, S., and Robinson, A. L. (2006). “Fine particle emission factors from vehicles in a highway tunnel: Effects of fleet composition and season.” Atmospheric Environment, 40, S287-S298.
  • Grieshop, A. P., Logue, J. M., Donahue, N. M., and Robinson, A. L. (2009). “Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires 1: measurement and simulation of organic aerosol evolution.” Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(4), 1263-1277.
  • Grieshop, A. P., Miracolo, M. A., Donahue, N. M., and Robinson, A. L. (2009). “Constraining the Volatility Distribution and Gas-Particle Partitioning of Combustion Aerosols Using Isothermal Dilution and Thermodenuder Measurements.” Environmental Science & Technology, 43(13), 4750-4756.

Dr. Frank HunteFrank Hunte
Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2004), University of Minnesota

Research Interests

Magnetic materials, interfacial exchange interactions in thin film heterostructures, ferromagnetic semiconductors; flux pinning in high temperature superconductors by magnetic nano-particles; plasma processing of materials including RF and DC magnetron sputtering.

Hunte received his BS and MS degrees in physics from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. He was a postdoctoral researcher and a visiting assistant scholar/scientist at the Applied Superconductivity Center within the Magnets and Materials Division of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University before joining the NC State faculty.

His research investigates magnetic materials and thin film heterostructures, including semiconductors and superconductors, processing methods, functionality and operating environments (thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic), from basic materials physics to technological applications. He is currently focused on ferromagnetic semiconductors which retain ferromagnetism at room temperature and memristors. Hunte also studies the relationship between magnetism and superconductivity in the family of unconventional multiband superconductors known as ferropnictides where magnetic correlations appear strongly.

Selected Publications
  • F. Hunte, J. Jaroszynski, A. Gurevich, D. C. Larbalestier, R. Jin, A. S. Sefat, M. A. McGuire, B. C. Sales, D. K. Christen, and D. Mandrus, “Two-band superconductivity in LaFeAsO0.89F0.11 at very high magnetic fields,” Nature,vol. 453, pp. 903-905, Jun 12 2008.
  • J. Jaroszynski, F. Hunte, L. Balicas, Y. J. Jo, I. Raicevic, A. Gurevich, D. C. Larbalestier, F. F. Balakirev, L. Fang, P. Cheng, Y. Jia, and H. H. Wen, “Upper critical fields and thermally-activated transport of NdFeAsO0.7F0.3 single crystal,” Physical Review B, vol. 78, Nov 2008.
  • D. Venus and F. Hunte, “Competition between magnetic relaxation mechanisms in exchange-coupled CoO/Co bilayers,” Physical Review B, vol. 72, Jul 2005.
  • D. Venus, F. Hunte, and E. D. Dahlberg, “Contribution of low-temperature degrees of freedom to the anisotropy in Co/CoO exchange coupled bilayers,” Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, vol. 286, pp. 191-195, Feb 1 2005.
  • D. Venus, F. Hunte, I. N. Krivorotov, T. Gredig, and E. D. Dahlberg, “Magnetic relaxation in exchange-coupled Co/CoO bilayers measured with ac-anisotropic magnetoresistance,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 93, pp. 8609-8611, May 15 2003.

Dr. Iqbal HusainIqbal Husain
Distinguished Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (1993), Texas A&M University

Research Interests

Electric motor drives and controls; electric machines design, controls and modeling; power electronics converter design, topologies and controls; electric and hybrid vehicles; and renewable energy systems.

Husain joined NC State’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering as a distinguished professor after serving as a faculty member at the University of Akron in Ohio for 17 years.

Husain has worked extensively on the development of SR and PM motor drives for various automotive and industrial applications. He has developed several sensorless control methods for switched reluctance machine (SRM) drives. The pioneering research on modeling and analysis of SRMs allowed Husain to make unique contributions in SRM design, control, acoustic noise prediction and parameter identification methods.

The uniqueness of the SRM modeling and analysis approach is the dependence of the model on machine geometry and material property. The research on PM machines is focused on torque ripple minimization, control algorithms and vibration and noise analysis. Husain has recently been working on microinverters for solar PV systems with grid interaction. He has also been developing methods for grid synchronization of renewable energy systems.

The primary application of Husain’s work is in the transportation, automotive and aerospace industries. As a result of this exposure, Husain naturally developed courses for graduate and undergraduate education in electric and hybrid vehicles and published the textbook entitled Electric and Hybrid Vehicles: Design Fundamentals, as well as a research portfolio on electric machines and drives for transportation applications.

Selected Publications
  • S. Underwood and I. Husain, “On-line Parameter Estimation and Adaptive Control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines,” IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, Vol. 57, No. 7, pp. 2335-2343, July 2010.
  • R. Islam, I. Husain, A. Fardoun, K. McLaughlin, “Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Magnet Designs with Skewing for Torque Ripple and Cogging Torque Reduction,” IEEE Trans. on Industry Applications, Vol. 45, No. 1, pp. 152-160, Jan.-Feb. 2009.
  • S. M. N. Hasan and I. Husain, “A Luenberger-Sliding Mode Observer for On-line Parameter Estimation and Adaptation in High-Performance Induction Motor Drives,” IEEE Trans. on Industry Applications, Vol. 45, No. 2, pp. 772-781, March-April 2009.

Dr. Albena IvanisevicAlbena Ivanisevic
Associate Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE)and the Joint UNC-NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME)
PhD (2000), University of Wisconsin-Madison

Research Interests

Massively parallel manufacturing of nanoscale structures with magnetic and metallic properties; high-resolution and -throughput surface characterization and lithographic tools for tissue engineering applications; and fabrication and characterization of semiconductor surfaces composed of biomolecular structures.

Ivanisevic received a BS in chemistry from Drake University and was inspired to pursue a PhD after doing undergraduate research in organic synthesis. She has received the MIT Technology Review’s TR100 Award: Top 100 Young Innovators (2004), the NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship (2004), and the National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship (Northwestern University, 2000-2002).

Ivanisevic’s research is centered on using surface techniques to immobilize biomolecules on inorganic and tissue surfaces. The work utilizes a broad perspective on problems in chemistry, materials and biomedical engineering and is aimed to address the need to understand how to manipulate and tailor the properties of surfaces for the fabrication of better sensor and tissue platforms. All projects involve the fabrication of new platforms for placement and evaluation of materials and permit one to do basic research that enables the tuning of materials properties. Many aspects of her projects are also interfaced with finding solutions for biomedical problems.

Selected Publications
  • H. Jaganathan and A. Ivanisevic, “In vitro cytotoxic evaluation of metallic and magnetic dna-templated nanostructures,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, vol. 2, pp. 1407-1413, May 2010.
  • M. A. Kramer, H. Jaganathan, and A. Ivanisevic, “Serial and parallel dip-pen nano lithography using a colloidal probe tip,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 132, pp. 4532, Apr 7 2010.
  • M. S. Makowski, D. Y. Zemlyanov, and A. Ivanisevic, “Olefin metathesis reaction on GaN (0001) surfaces,” Applied Surface Science, vol. 257, pp. 4625-4632, Mar 1 2011.
  • D. N. Richards, D. Y. Zemlyanov, R. M. Asrar, Y. Y. Chokshi, E. M. Cook, T. J. Hinton, X. R. Lu, V. Q. Nguyen, N. K. Patel, J. R. Usher, S. Vaidyanathan, D. A. Yeung, and A. Ivanisevic, “DNA immobilization on GaP(100) investigated by kelvin probe force microscopy,” Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 114, pp. 15486-15490, Sep 16 2010.

Dr. Edward J. JaselskisEdward J. Jaselskis
Jimmy D. Clark Distinguished Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (1988), University of Texas at Austin

Research Interests

Modeling and predicting construction project success, application of tele-presence techniques to create a virtual engineering and management environment for capital facility projects, and real time remote monitoring of construction
site operations.

Jaselskis received his BS in general engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his MS in civil engineering with an emphasis in construction engineering and management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a PhD in civil engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. He has served as a program director for the National Science Foundation in the area of information technology and infrastructure systems.

Presently he studies how tele-engineering and management concepts can be applied to improve the efficiency of construction site operations. He is currently developing a Tele-Engineering and Management (TEAM) laboratory where he will investigate how virtual interaction among team participants (e.g., designers, sureties, owners, contractors, material suppliers and subcontractors) can improve quality, reduce cost and ensure timely project delivery.

Selected Publications
  • Jaselskis, Edward J., Ruwanpura, J., Becker, T., Silva, L., Jewell, P., and Floyd, E., “Innovation in Construction Engineering Education Using Two Applications of Internet-based Information Technology to Provide Real-Time Project Observations,” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management,American Society of Civil Engineers, Special Issue, October 2011.
  • Cable, James K., Edward J. Jaselskis, Russell Walters, and Chris Bauer (2009), “Stringless Portland Cement Concrete Paving,” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Vol. 135, Issue 11, pp. 1253-1260.
  • Walters, Russell, Edward J. Jaselskis, Jianzhong Zhang, and Kim Mueller, “Using Scanning Lasers to Determine the Thickness of Concrete Pavement,” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, American Society of Civil Engineers, August 2008, Vol. 13, No. 6, pp. 583-591.
  • Jaselskis, Edward J., J. Grigas, and A. Brilingas, “Dielectric Properties of Asphalt Pavement,” Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. 15, No. 5, September/October 2003, pp. 427-434.

Dr. Yun JingYun Jing
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2009), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Research Interests

Ultrasound tomography for biomedical imaging with applications to brain and breast imaging, numerical algorithms for predicting acoustic wave behavior in various media, and acoustics of meta-materials for sub-wavelength imaging and energy harvesting.

Jing received his BS in electronic science and engineering from Nanjing University in China in 2006 and his MS from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2007. He received his PhD in architectural acoustics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2009. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was a research fellow at Brigham and Women’s Hospital at Harvard Medical School. He specializes in the development of analytic and numerical methods for linear and nonlinear wave propagation in fluids. His theoretical work involves the derivation of exact, asymptotic and numerical solutions and the analysis of their mathematical and physical properties.

Selected Publications
  • Yun Jing, Du Shen and Greg Clement, Verification of the Westervelt equation for focused transducers, IEEE Transactions on UFFC, 58, 2011, pp. 1097-1101.
  • Yun Jing and Greg Clement, Evaluation of a wave vector frequency domain method for nonlinear wave propagation, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 129, 2011, pp. 32-46.
  • Yun Jing, Edward Larsen and Ning Xiang, One-dimensional transport equation models for sound energy propagation in long spaces: Theory, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 127, 2010, pp. 2312-2322.
  • Yun Jing and Ning Xiang, One-dimensional transport equation models for sound energy propagation in long spaces: simulations and experimental results, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 127, 2010, pp. 2323-2331.
  • Yun Jing and Ning Xiang, On boundary conditions for the diffusion equation in room-acoustic prediction: Theory, simulations, and experiments, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 123, 2008, pp. 145-153.

Dr. Jesse S. JurJesse S. Jur
Assistant Professor
Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science
PhD (2007), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Hybrid materials, nanotechnology, surface modification, fibers and polymers, technical textiles and textile structures.

Jur received his BS in chemical engineering from the University of South Carolina and his MS in chemical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. After earning his PhD in materials science and engineering from NC State, Jur was a research faculty member in the university’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering before joining its College of Textiles. Jur also has experience in the microelectronics industry, working on process design at NeoPhotonics Corp. in San Jose, Calif.; AMD Corp.; IBM Corp. in East Fishkill, NY; and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, Calif.

Jur’s research targets the understanding of materials processing methods for producing and controlling nanoscale inorganic modification to polymer fiber structures. These novel hybrid (organic-inorganic) textile materials are of particular interest for electronic, optical, catalytic and mechanical enhancements.

Selected Publications
  • Jur, J. S., Sweet, W. J., Oldham, C. J., and Parsons, G. N., 2011, “Atomic Layer Deposition of Conductive Coatings on Cotton, Paper, and Synthetic Fibers: Conductivity Analysis and Functional Chemical Sensing using ‘All-Fiber’ Capacitors” Advanced Functional Material, 21 (11), 1993-2002.
  • Jur, J. S., and Parsons, G. N., 2011, “Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 and ZnO at Atmospheric Pressure in a Flow Tube Reactor” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 3, 299-308.
  • Jur, J. S., Spagnola, J. C., Lee, K., Gong, B., Peng, Q., and Parsons, G. N., 2010, “Temperature-Dependent Sub-Surface Film Growth during Atomic Layer Deposition on Polypropylene and Cellulose Fibers” Langmuir, 26 (11), 8239-8244.
  • Spagnola, J. C., Gong, B., Arvidson, S. A., Jur, J. S., Khan, S., and Parsons, G. N., 2010, “Surface and sub-surface reactions during low temperature aluminium oxide atomic layer deposition on fiber-forming polymers” Journal of Materials Chemistry, 20 (20), 4213-4222.
  • LeBeau, J. M., Jur, J. S., Lichtenwalner, D. J., Craft, H. S., Maria, J.-P., Kingon, A. I., Klenov, D. O., Cagnon J., and Stemmer, S., 2008, “High Temperature Stability of Hf-based Gate Dielectric Stacks with Rare-earth Oxide Layers for Threshold Voltage” Applied Physics Letters, 92 (11), 112912.

Dr. Thom LaBeanThom LaBean
Associate Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (1993), University of Pennsylvania

Research Interests

Self-assembling materials designed from engineered and synthetic biopolymers for applications in nanomedicine and in nanofabrication of electronic and photonic devices; bio-inspired molecular materials with micron-scale dimensions and nanometer-scale features; and artificial, programmable biomineralization.

LaBean earned his BS in biochemistry from the Honors College at Michigan State University and his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Pennsylvania. He studied protein design as a postdoctoral fellow at Duke University and later studied structural DNA nanotechnology and served as research professor in Duke’s departments of Computer Science, Chemistry, and Biomedical Engineering.

Throughout his career, LaBean has studied the structure, evolution and engineering of biopolymers (biomacromolecules and materials assembled from them). Current research projects involve the design, construction and testing of self-assembling DNA nanostructures for applications in molecular materials, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, molecular robotics, and nanomedicine. Potential applications include the further miniaturization of electronics circuits and devices, creation of stimulus responsive constructs for chemo- and bio-sensing, and molecular therapeutics with inherent computational function.

Selected Publications
  • J. D. Carter and T. H. LaBean, “Organization of inorganic nanomaterials via programmable DNA self-assembly and peptide molecular recognition,” ACS Nano, vol. 5, pp. 2200-2205, Mar 2011.
  • M. N. Hansen, A. M. Zhang, A. Rangnekar, K. M. Bompiani, J. D. Carter, K. V. Gothelf, and T. H. LaBean, “Weave tile architecture construction strategy for DNA nanotechnology,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 132, pp. 14481-14486, Oct 20 2010.
  • H. Y. Li, J. D. Carter, and T. H. LaBean, “Nanofabrication by DNA self-assembly,” Materials Today, vol. 12, pp. 24-32, May 2009.
  • E. C. Samano, M. Pilo-Pais, S. Goldberg, B. N. Vogen, G. Finkelstein, and T. H. LaBean, “Self-assembling DNA templates for programmed artificial biomineralization,” Soft Matter, vol. 7, pp. 3240-3245, 2011.
  • H. Yan, S. H. Park, G. Finkelstein, J. H. Reif, and T. H. LaBean, “DNA-templated self-assembly of protein arrays and highly conductive nanowires,” Science, vol. 301, pp. 1882-1884, Sep 26 2003.

Dr. James LeBeauJames LeBeau
Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2010), University of California at Santa Barbara

Research Interests

Scanning transmission electron microscopy; atomic configuration at defects; interfaces between heterogeneous materials; and quantitative imaging and diffraction in electron microscopy.

LeBeau received his BS in materials science and engineering in 2006 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He joined the Materials Science and Engineering faculty in Janu-ary 2011.

LeBeau’s research interests focus on applying and developing transmission electron microscopy techniques to determine the atomic structure of material defects, thus providing insight into observed properties. This is of particular importance as electron-ic devices scale to ever vanishingly small dimensions when the detailed arrangement of atoms at interfaces begins to critically influence material properties.  One technique, atomic resolution high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission elec-tron microscopy, is emphasized because the images are directly interpretable and the intensities depend sensitively upon the number and type of atoms present. Having shown that HAADF images from experiment agree quantitatively with simulations, LeBeau is interested in exploring the detailed image intensities to provide information about the atomic structure without the need for calibration standards.

Selected Publications
  • J. M. LeBeau, R. Engel-Herbert, B. Jalan, J. Cagnon, P. Moetakef, S. Stemmer, and G. B. Stephenson, “Stoichiometry optimization of homoepitaxial oxide thin films using x-ray diffraction,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 95, Oct 5 2009.
  • J. M. LeBeau, S. D. Findlay, L. J. Allen, and S. Stemmer, “Quantitative atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy,” Physical Review Letters, vol. 100, May 23, 2008.
  • J. M. LeBeau, S. D. Findlay, L. J. Allen, and S. Stemmer, “Position averaged convergent beam electron diffraction: Theory and applications,” Ultramicroscopy, vol. 110, pp. 118-125, Jan 2010.
  • J. M. LeBeau, S. D. Findlay, X. Q. Wang, A. J. Jacobson, L. J. Allen, and S. Stemmer, “High-angle scattering of fast electrons from crystals containing heavy elements: Simulation and experiment,” Physical Review B, vol. 79, Jun 2009.
  • J. M. LeBeau, Q. O. Hu, C. J. Palmstrom, and S. Stemmer, “Atomic structure of postgrowth annealed epitaxial Fe/(001) GaAs interfaces,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 93, Sep 22 2008.

Dr. Fanxing LiFanxing Li
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
PhD (2009), Ohio State University

Research Interests

Nano catalysts and reagent particles for biomass and fossil energy conversions, green liquid fuel synthesis, CO2 capture and pollutant control.

Li received his BS and MS degrees in chemical engineering from Tsinghua University in China in 2001 and 2004, respectively. He joined Dr. Liang-Shih Fan’s research group at the Ohio State University in 2004 and received his PhD in 2009. Since then, he continued to work with Fan as a research scientist. Working with Fan, Li has prepared eight funded proposals and obtained $15 million in research grants. Li is also inventor or co-inventor on seven patents and has published 18 journal articles and book chapters. He has won numerous international awards, including the prestigious Best PhD in Particle Technology Award that he received in 2010.

Energy and global warming are two intertwined issues of critical importance in the modern era. The Li Research Group focuses on the design, synthesis and characterization of nano catalysts and reagent particles for biomass and fossil energy conversions, green liquid fuel synthesis, CO2 capture and pollutant control. Li’s group also encompasses chemical reaction engineering and process synthesis and optimization. Density Functional Theory-based methods are also used to elucidate the particle reaction mechanisms and identify potential ways to improve particle performance.

Selected Publications
  • Fanxing Li, Siwei Luo, Zhenchao Sun, Xiaoguang Bao, and L.-S. Fan. “Role of Metal Oxide Support in Redox Reactions of Iron Oxide for Chemical Looping Applications: Experiments and Density Functional Theory Calculations.” Energy and Environmental Science. 2011 (In Press, DOI: 10.1039/C1EE01325D).
  • Fanxing Li, Zhenchao Sun, Siwei Luo, and L.-S. Fan. “Ionic Diffusion in Iron Oxidation – Effect of Support and Its Implications to Chemical Looping Applications.” Energy and Environmental Science. 2011, 4, 876-880.
  • Fanxing Li, Liang Zeng, and L.-S. Fan. “Biomass Direct Chemical Looping Process: Process Simulations.” Fuel. 2010, 89(12): 3773 – 3784.
  • Fanxing Li, L.-S. Fan. “Clean Coal Conversion Processes – Progress and Challenges.”
    Energy and Environmental Science. 2008, 1:248-267.
  • Fanxing Li, Yao Wang, Dezheng Wang, and Fei Wei. “Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by N2 adsorption.” Carbon, 2004, 42: 2375-2383.

Dr. Yunan LiuYunan Liu
Assistant Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (2011), Columbia University

Research Interests

Stochastic modeling, applied probability, queueing systems and fluid approximations.

Liu received his BS in electrical engineering from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. He received his MS in industrial engineering and operations research and a PhD in operations research from Columbia University. Liu studies queuing theory, stochastic modeling and applied probability, with applications in service systems, especially cus-tomer contact centers, manufacturing systems and health care systems. He models and approximates the system dynamics using both stochastic models and deterministic fluid approximations. Liu’s research can be used to improve capacity planning and operational control in such systems.

Selected Publications
  • Liu, Y. and Whitt, W., 2011, “A Network of Time-Varying Many-Server Fluid Queues with Customer Abandonment.” Operations Research (forthcoming).
  • Liu, Y. and Whitt, W., 2011, “Nearly Periodic Behavior in The Overloaded G/D/S+GI Queue.” Stochastic Systems, vol. 1, pp. 1-71.
  • Liu, Y. and Whitt, W., 2011, “Large-Time Asymptotics for the G_t/M_t/s_t+GI_t Many-Server Fluid Queue with Abandonment.” Queueing Systems, vol. 67, pp. 145-182.
  • Liu, Y. and Whitt, W., 2010, “A Fluid Approximation for Large-Scale Service Systems: Extended Abstract.” Performance Evaluation Review, Special Issue on 2010 MAMA conference.

Dr. Edgar J. LobatonEdgar J. Lobaton
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2009), University of California, Berkeley

Research Interests

Robotics, computer vision, control theory and sensor networks. Sample applications areas are robotic assisted surgical procedures and optimal placement and control of imaging/sensing devices for security and monitoring applications.

Lobaton received his BS degrees in mathematics and electrical engineering from Seattle University in 2004. He completed his PhD in electrical engineering and computer sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2009.

His areas of research include robotics and control, sensor networks and computer vision. He works on applications ranging from surveillance using smart camera systems to motion planning for medical robotic applications. Prior to joining NC State, he was awarded the 2009 Computer Innovation Fellows postdoctoral fellowship award and conducted research in the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was also engaged in research at Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs in 2005 and 2009.

Selected Publications
  • E. Lobaton, R. Vasudevan, R. Bajcsy and R. Alterovitz, “Robust Topological Features for Deformation Invariant Image Matching,” International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), Spain, 2011.
  • E. Lobaton, J. Zhang, S. Patil and R. Alterovitz, “Planning Curvature-Constrained Paths to Multiple Goals Using Disk Sampling,” International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2011.
  • R. Vasudevan, G. Kurillo, E. Lobaton, T. Bernardin, O. Kreylos, R. Bajcsy and K. Nahrstedt, “High Quality Visualization for Geographically Distributed 3D Teleimmersive Applications,” IEEE Transactions on Multimedia, 13(3), 2011, 573-584.
  • E. Lobaton, R. Vasudevan, R. Bajcsy, and S.S. Sastry, “A Distributed Topological Camera Network Representation for Tracking Applications,” IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, 19(10), 2010, 2516-2529.
  • E. Lobaton and A. Bayen, “Modeling and Optimization Analysis of a Single-Flagellum Micro-Structure through the Method of Regularized Stokeslets,” IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, 17(4), 2009, 907-916.

Dr. John MattinglyJohn Mattingly
Associate Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
PhD (1998), University of Tennessee

Research Interests

Neutron and gamma time-correlation, coincidence and multiplicity counting, spec-trometry, and imaging applied to nuclear nonproliferation and counterterrorism; radiation transport modeling applied to the design of neutron and gamma measurement systems; and inverse radiation transport methods to analyze neutron and gamma measurements.

Mattingly received his BS, MS and PhD degrees in nuclear engineering from the University of Tennessee. In 1995 he was awarded a postgraduate research fellowship at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and in 1997, he joined the technical staff at ORNL, where he was promoted to the senior staff in 2002. In 2003 Mattingly was hired as a principal member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM.

While at ORNL, Mattingly developed active neutron interrogation systems and analysis methods based on neutron time-correlation for nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards. At SNL, he developed inverse radiation transport methods to analyze gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity measurements for nuclear nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and emergency response applications. Mattingly also served as a 24/7 on-call emergency response radiation analyst for the US Departments of Energy and Homeland Security.

At NC State, Mattingly plans to develop a program of education and research in radiation detection for nuclear security applications. The primary technical focus of this program, which evolves from Mattingly’s earlier work, will be to apply inverse modeling methods to analyze radiation measurements.

Selected Publications
  • J. K. Mattingly, D. J. Mitchell, and L. T. Harding, “Experimental Validation of a Coupled Neutron-Photon Inverse Radiation Transport Solver,” invited paper, Symposium on Radiation Measurements and Applications, May 2010. Also published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section A, article in press, available online, 2011.
  • J. K. Mattingly and D. J. Mitchell, “A Framework for the Solution of Inverse Radiation Transport Problems,” Transactions on Nuclear Science, Vol. 75 No. 6, December 2010.
  • C. Yi, G. Sjoden, J. Mattingly, and T. Corau, “Computationally Optimized Multi-group Cross Section Data Collapsing using the YGROUP Code,” American Nuclear Society PHYSOR Topical Meeting, May 2010.
  • J. K. Mattingly, “Computation of Neutron Multiplicity Statistics using Deterministic Transport,” IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, October 2009.

Dr. Brina MortensenBrina Mortensen
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2011), University of California, Davis

Research Interests

Bio-mediated soil improvement, identification and behavior of naturally cemented soil, and sustainable building materials.

Mortensen’s doctoral research evaluated the use of bio-mediated soil improvement as a mechanism to mitigate liquefaction-induced damage in a seismic event. Bio-mediated soil improvement is the use of the metabolic activity of natural soil bacteria to catalyze the precipitation of carbonate minerals. The mineral precipitation cements sand grains together which improves the strength and stiffness of the soil and reduces the susceptibility to damage due to earthquakes. Mortensen’s future research interests focus on continuing the development of bio-mediated soil improvement technology towards field implementation as well as improving methods to identify and characterize naturally cemented sands.

Mortensen received her BS in civil engineering from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, Calif., in 2003 and her MS in civil engineering from the University of California, Davis, in 2008. Mortensen has received the Excellence in Geotechnical Engineering Award at UC Davis and has been awarded an independent research grant from the Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society. She was also a UC Davis Professors for the Future Fellow during the 2010-2011 academic year, during which she co-developed the M3 Toolbox for graduate students to successfully mentor, manage and motivate student researchers. As a graduate student, Mortensen taught the upper division undergraduate civil engineering course, Foundation Design, and has been a teaching assistant for several years for the graduate-level soil characterization laboratory.

Before beginning her graduate studies, Mortensen worked as a geotechnical consulting engineer in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she performed field and laboratory investigations and developed foundation designs and construction recommendations for residential, commercial and governmental development projects. Mortensen is a licensed engineer in the state of California. She will join the NC State faculty in January 2012.

Selected Publications
  • Mortensen B.M., Haber, M., DeJong, J.T., Caslake, L., Nelson, D.C. (2011). “Effects of Envi-ronmental Factors on Microbial Induced Calcite Precipitation.” Applied Microbiology, 111, 338-349.
  • Mortensen, B., Gerhard, R., DeJong, J., Weil, M., Martinez, B., Pederson, L., Wilson, D. (2011). “Fabrication, Operation, and Health Monitoring of Bender Elements for Aggressive Environments.” ASTM Journal of Geotechnical Testing, (in review).

Dr. Chang S. Nam Chang S. Nam
Associate Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (2003), Virginia Tech

Research Interests

Brain-computer interface and neurorehabilitation, haptic user interaction, cognitive ergonomics and neuroergonomics, and adaptive and intelligent human-computer interaction.

Nam received his BS in industrial engineering from Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea. He received his MS in industrial engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo and an MBA from Sogang University, also in South Korea. He received a PhD in human factors and ergonomics from the Grado Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Virginia Tech. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was an assistant professor and associate professor at the University of Arkansas, where he received the NSF CAREER Award, the College of Engineering Outstanding Researcher Award and the Best Teacher Award.

Nam teaches and conducts basic and applied research in human factors and ergonomics engineering to advance the science of human-computer interaction with a broad perspective on the application of systems and information engineering to human-centered technologies, including healthcare systems and rehabilitation engineering. Presently he studies cognitive and affective impacts of a sensory feedback-based hands-on learning experience on science education for students with and without severe visual impairments by implementing cognitively motivating and socially enriched learning principles. Nam also studies brain-computer interface technology, including noninvasive methods to monitor and obtain brain signals; effective signal processing methods that extract signal features; innovative algorithms that translate these features into device commands; and the development and evaluation of potential applications. He will continue to focus on these emerging research areas that have a real impact on the independence and quality of life of people with disabilities.

Selected Publications
  • Nam, C. S., Jeon, Y., Kim, Y-J., Lee, I., and Park, K. (2011). Movement Imagery-Related Latralization of Event-Related (De)Synchronization (ERD/ERS): Motor-Imagery Duration Effects. Clinical Neurophysiology, 122 (3), 567-577.
  • Li, Y., Nam, C. S., Shadden, B., and Johnson, S. (2011). A P300-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI): Effects of Interface Type and Screen Size. International Journal of Human Computer Interaction, 27 (1), 52-68.
  • Nam, C. S., Li, Y., and Johnson, S. (2010). Evaluation of P300-Based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) in Real-World Contexts. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 26 (6), 621-637.

Dr. Ömer OralkanÖmer Oralkan
Associate Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2004), Stanford University

Research Interests

Ultrasound imaging, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers, integrated frontend electronics for ultrasound imaging, photoacoustic imaging, image-guided therapeutics, chemical and biological sensor arrays, and ultrasound neural stimulation.

Oralkan received his BS from Bilkent University in Turkey in 1995, his MS from Clemson University in 1997 and his PhD from Stanford University in 2004, all in electrical engineering.

He was a research associate from 2004 to 2007 at the Ginzton Laboratory at Stanford and was then promoted to a senior research associate from 2007 to 2011. He served as an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Santa Clara University from 2009 to 2011.

Oralkan’s past and present research interests include electronic circuit design, semiconductor devices, micromachined sensors and medical imaging. His current research focuses on the design and implementation of integrated systems for catheter-based medical ultrasound imaging applications, image-guided therapeutics, photoacoustic imaging, chemical and biological sensor arrays and ultrasound neural stimulation.

He has authored and co-authored more than 100 publications and received the 2002 Outstanding Paper Award of the IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control Society. He is a senior member of IEEE. He will join the NC State faculty in January 2012.

Selected Publications
  • Ö. Oralkan, A. S. Ergun, J. A. Johnson, M. Karaman, U. Demirci, K. Kaviani, T. H. Lee, and B. T. Khuri-Yakub, “Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays: next generation arrays for acoustic imaging?” IEEE Trans. Ultrason., Ferroelect., Freq. Contr., 49 (11), 1596-1610.
  • Ö. Oralkan, B. Bayram, G. G. Yaralioglu, A. S. Ergun, M. Kupnik, D. T. Yeh, I. O. Wygant, and B. T. Khuri-Yakub, “Experimental characterization of collapse-mode CMUT operation,” IEEE Trans. Ultrason., Ferroelect., Freq. Contr., 53 (8), 1513-1523.
  • I. O. Wygant, N. S. Jamal, H. J. Lee, A. Nikoozadeh, Ö. Oralkan, M. Karaman, and B. T. Khuri-Yakub, “An integrated circuit with transmit beamforming flip-chip bonded to a 2-D CMUT array for 3-D ultrasound imaging,” IEEE Trans. Ultrason., Ferroelect., Freq. Contr., 56 (10), 2145-2156.
  • B. T. Khuri-Yakub, Ö. Oralkan, and M. Kupnik, “Next-gen ultrasound,” IEEE Spectrum, 46 (5), 44-54.

Dr. Mohammad Pour-GhazMohammad Pour-Ghaz
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2011), Purdue University

Research Interests

Health monitoring and service life prediction of concrete structures, durability of reinforced concrete structures, non-destructive testing and in-situ sensing, flow and transport in fractured porous media, and sustainable materials for
civil infrastructure.

Pour-Ghaz earned his BS in civil engineering from Tabriz University in Iran in 2003. Before pursuing his MS in civil engineering, he practiced as a research engineer in the area of nondestructive testing of composites at a research and development company in Concord, Ontario, Canada. After receiving his MS in 2007 from Carleton University in Canada, he attended Purdue University where he earned his PhD in civil engineering with an emphasis in concrete materials. While at Purdue, Pour-Ghaz received the William L. Dolch Graduate Scholarship for outstanding research in materials science and the Magoon Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Pour-Ghaz currently investigates the use of electrical methods for damage tomography in concrete structures. His research in this area involves development of new electrical imaging techniques, development and application of sensing skins for concrete elements, and development of self-sensing concrete materials. Pour-Ghaz also studies the effect of discrete fractures and distributed networks of fractures on moisture flow and transport in cement-based composites. He performs his research in this area using both experimental and numerical methods.

Selected Publications
  • Pour-Ghaz, M., Weiss, J. Application of frequency selective circuits for crack detection in concrete elements. Journal of ASTM International. 2011; (In press).
  • Pour-Ghaz, M., Kim, J., Nadukuru, S.S., O’Connor, S., Michalowski, R.L., Bradshaw, A., Green, R.A., Lynch, J.P., Poursaee, A., Weiss, J. Using electrical, magnetic and acoustic sensors to detect damage in segmental concrete pipes subjected to permanent ground displacement. Cement and Concrete Composites. 2011; 33(7): 749-762.
  • Pour-Ghaz, M., Weiss, J. Detecting the time and location of cracks using electrically conductive surfaces. Cement and Concrete Composites. 2011; 33:116-23.
  • Pour-Ghaz, M., Isgor, O.B., Ghods, P. The effect of temperature on the corrosion of steel in concrete. Part 1: simulated polarization resistance tests and model development. Corrosion Science. 2009; 51(2):415-25.
  • Pour-Ghaz, M., Rajabipour, F., Couch, J., Weiss, J. Numerical and experimental assessment of unsaturated fluid transport in saw-cut (notched) concrete elements. In: Tanesi, J. editor. Model-ing as a Solution to Concrete Problems. ACI Special Publication. 2009; SP-266:73-86.

Dr. Rohan A. ShirwaikerRohan A. Shirwaiker
Assistant Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (2011), Pennsylvania State University

Research Interests

Biomedical design and manufacturing, biomaterials for infection control, micro/nano-scale process engineering, and design decision-making and problem solving methodologies.

Shirwaiker received his BS in production engineering from the University of Mumbai in India. He received his MS and PhD degrees in industrial engineering with a specialization in manufacturing systems from Pennsylvania State University. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he completed engineering internships at Larsen & Toubro Ltd., Harley Davidson Motor Co. and QBC Diagnostics. He is a member of the Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society, the Alpha Pi Mu Industrial Engineering Honor Society, the Golden Key International Honor Society, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, and the International Society for Biofabrication.

Shirwaiker studies the design, fabrication and characterization of functional biomedical surfaces utilizing alternative antibacterial materials. His current research projects focus on the characterization and parametric modeling of silver ion and nanoparticle-based antibacterial surfaces with micro and nano-scale physical and electrical design features. He also studies additive manufacturing processes for applications in tissue engineering. All of these topics are investigated using both theory and experimental techniques.

Selected Publications
  • R.A. Shirwaiker, R.A. Wysk, S. Kariyawasam, H. Carrion, and R.C. Voigt (2011) “Micro-scale fabrication and characterization of a silver-polymer based electrically activated antibacterial surface,” Biofabrication, 3(1), 015003.
  • R.A. Wysk, W.J. Sebastianelli, R.A. Shirwaiker, G.M. Bailey, C. Charumani, M. Kennett, A. Kaucher, R. Abrahams, T.A. Fuller, P. Royer, R.C. Voigt and P.H. Cohen (2010) “Prophylactic bactericidal orthopedic implants — animal testing study,” Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering, 3(9), 917-926.
  • T. Fuller, R. Wysk, C. Charumani, M. Kennett, W. Sebastiennelli, R. Abrahams, R.A. Shirwaiker, R. Voigt and P. Royer (2010) “Developing an engineered antimicrobial/prophylactic system using electrically activated bactericidal metals,” Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine,21(7), 2103-2114.
  • R.A. Shirwaiker and G.E. Okudan (2008) “TRIZ and axiomatic design: a review of case-studies and a proposed synergistic use,” Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing, 19(1), 33-47.

Dr. David SturgillDavid Sturgill
Teaching Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (1997), Cornell University

Research Interests

Parallel and distributed computation and competitive learning.

Sturgill completed his BS degrees in computer science and mathematics from the University of South Carolina in 1989. He earned his MS and PhD degrees in computer science from Cornell University in 1994 and 1997, respectively. Sturgill taught in the Department of Computer Science at Baylor University for 14 years, where he had served as the graduate director since 2007.

At NC State, Sturgill works with the Senior Design Center in computer science. He also serves as the director of the Association for Computing Machinery International Collegiate Programming Contest Challenge, a program-vs-program competition among teams of computer science students from universities around the world.

Selected Publications
  • P. Edelman, M.J. Donahoo and D. Sturgill, Secure Group Communications for Delay-Tolerant Networks. In Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Conference for Internet Technology and Secured Transactions.
  • D. Sturgill, B. Van Ruitenbeek and R.J. Marks II. Image Compression and Recovery through Compressive Sampling and Particle Swarm. In Proceedings of the 2009 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics.
  • D. Sturgill and G. Pant. Evaluation Criteria for Genetically-Tuned Problem-Solving Experts. In Proceedings of the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference, July 1999.
  • D. Sturgill and A.M. Segre. Nagging: a Distributed, Adversarial Search-Pruning Technique Applied to First-Order Inference. Journal of Automated Reasoning, Dec. 1997.
  • A.M. Segre and D. Sturgill. Using Hundreds of Workstations to Solve First-Order Logic Problems. In Proceedings of the AAAI-94, August 1994.

Dr. Emily ZechmanEmily Zechman
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2005), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Water resources planning and management, systems analysis, evolutionary com-putation, complex adaptive systems and agent-based modeling.

Zechman joined NC State’s Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering in July 2011. She graduated with her BS and MS degrees in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky. Zechman earned her PhD in civil engineering from NC State in 2005.

Her research interests are in the development of new computational methodologies to explore the influence of feedbacks among social and infrastructure systems.Her research creates new socio-technical models by integrating complex adaptive systems modeling approaches with engineering models to simulate feedback mechanisms and adaptive behaviors among consumers, infrastructure and environmental systems. New evolutionary algorithm-based approaches are coupled with socio-technical models to identify optimal adaptive strategies for managing sustainability, security and resilience of complex infrastructure and water resources systems. Specifically, she is exploring the sustainability of urban water supply and the protection of human health in water contamination incidents.

Zechman teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in water resources engineering, hydrology and systems analysis for civil engineering. She received the Best Research-Oriented Paper Award in 2010 and 2011 for her publications in the Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, a publication of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Selected Publications
  • Kanta, L., E.M. Zechman, and K. Brumbelow “A multi-objective evolutionary computation approach to hazards mitigation design for water distribution systems,” J Water Resources Planning and Management (in press).
  • Giacomoni, M., E.M. Zechman, and K. Brumbelow “The Hydrologic Footprint Residence: An Environmentally-friendly Criteria for Best Management Practices,” J Hydrologic Engineering, doi:10.1061/(ASCE)HE.1943-5584.0000407.
  • Zechman, E.M. (2011) “Agent-Based Modeling to Simulate Contamination Events and Evaluate Threat Management Strategies in Water Distribution Systems,” Risk Analysis 31(5), pp. 758-772, 2011.

Year 2010-11

Dr. Tarek N. AzizTarek N. Aziz
Teaching Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (1986), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Research Interests

Engineering education, experimentation and modeling of physicochemical and biochemical processes in environmental fluid mechanics, computational fluid dynamics, waste to energy.

Aziz received his BS and MS in civil engineering from Clemson University. He received his PhD in civil, construction, and environmental engineering from North Carolina State University in 2010 where his doctoral work investigated the meas-urement and removal of fat, oil, and grease from wastewater.

Aziz’s current research interests include investigation of technology in the engineer-ing classroom and its role on student motivation. He is also interested in the use of computational fluid dynamics in predicting the performance of energy generating systems, the modeling of the anaerobic digestion processes for wastewater treatment, and the investigation the anaerobic co-digestion of oily wastes in order to enhance biogas production.

Selected Publications
  • Aziz, T. N., Holt, L. M., Keener, K. M., Groninger, J., and Ducoste, J. J. (2010). “The Per-formance of Grease Abatement Devices for the Removal of Fat, Oil and Grease.” ASCE Journal of Environmental Engineering, (In Press).
  • Aziz, T. N., Holt, L. M., Keener, K. M., Groninger, J., and Ducoste, J. J. (2010). “Field Performance of Grease Abatement Devices.” Journal of Environmental Management, (In Review).
  • Aziz, T. N., Raidford, J. P., and Khan, A. A. (2008). “Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Jets.” Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Mechanics,2(2), 234-243.

Dr. Dror BaronDror Baron
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2003), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research Interests

Compressed sensing, signal processing, information theory, and computer engineering.

Baron’s undergraduate studies were in the Electrical Engineering Department at the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology, where he belonged to the Program for Outstanding Students. Following his graduation, he designed hardware modems at Witcom, an Israeli startup specializing in broadband wireless communication. At the same time, he was pursuing his MSc, also at the Technion. In 1999 he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he completed his PhD in 2003. During the spring 2003 semester, he served as a visiting assistant professor at the University of Illinois. After completing his PhD, Baron was a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University from 2003 to 2006, where he performed research with the Digital Signal Processing research group, which was among the pioneering groups in compressed sensing. From 2007 to 2008 he was a Quantitative Research Analyst with Menta Capital in San Francisco, where he developed quantitative investment strategies. He also served as a visiting scientist in the Electrical Engineering Department at the Technion from 2008 to 2010.

Selected Publications
  • D. Baron, M. B. Wakin, M. F. Duarte, S. Sarvotham, and R.G.Baraniuk, “Distributed Compressed Sensing,” Technical Report ECE-0612, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Rice University, December 2006.
  • D. Baron, S. Sarvotham, and R. G. Baraniuk, “Bayesian Compressive Sensing via Belief Propagation,” IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing vol. 58, no. 1, pp. 269-280, January 2010.
  • D. Baron and Y. Bresler, “An O(N) Semi-Predictive Universal Encoder via the BWT,” IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, vol. 50, No. 5, pp. 928-937, May 2004.
  • D. Takhar, J. N. Laska, M. B. Wakin, M. F. Duarte, D. Baron, S. Sarvotham, K. F. Kelly, and R. G. Baraniuk, “A New Compressive Imaging Camera Architecture using Optical-Domain Compression,” SPIE Electronic Imaging, San Jose, CA, pp. 43-52, January 2006.
  • D. Guo, D. Baron, and S. Shamai, “A Single-letter Characterization of Optimal Noisy Compressed Sensing,” Proceedings of the 47th Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Monticello, IL, September 2009.

Dr. Alper BozkurtAlper Bozkurt
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2010), Cornell University

Research Interests

Bionic microsystems, neural prosthetics, insect biobots, biomedical micro-electro-mechanical-systems, biophotonics-based brain-machine-interfaces and clinical monitoring systems.

Bozkurt received his B.Sc. degree in electrical and electronics engineering in 2001 from Bogazici University in Istanbul, Turkey, where he performed research on EEG source localization. He received his M.Sc. degree in biomedical engineering in 2004 from Drexel University, where he developed functional near infrared spectroscopy systems for brain-machine interfaces to augment cognition and clinical monitoring of the new-born brain in neonatal intensive care units. He received his PhD in 2010 from Cornell University’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, where he developed mi-crosystems for neural engineering applications. During his doctoral studies, Bozkurt successfully interfaced metamorphic growth of invertebrates with microelectronics based microsystems, demonstrating the concept of insect cyborgs for the first time. He also worked as an official consultant for the recent Disney movie “G-Force” produced by Jerry Bruckheimer. Bozkurt is a recipient of the Calhoun Fellowship from Drexel University and the Donald Kerr Award at Cornell University.

Selected Publications
  • Bozkurt, A., Gilmour, R., Lal, A. (2010). In Vivo Electrochemical Characterization of Tissue-Electrode Interface During Metamorphic Growth. (Submitted)
  • Bozkurt, A., Lal, A. (2010). Low-Cost Flexible Printed Circuit Technology- based Microelectrode Array for Extracellular Stimulation of Invertebrate Locomotory System. (Submitted)
  • Bozkurt, A., Gilmour, R., Lal, A. (2009). Balloon Assisted Flight of Radio Controlled Insect Biobots. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering,56:9, pp. 2304-7. (cover article)
  • Bozkurt, A., Gilmour, R., Sinha, A., Stern, D., Lal, A. (2009). Insect Machine Interface Based Neuro Cybernetics. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 56:6, pp. 1727-33.
  • Bozkurt, A., Gilmour, R., Stern, D., Lal, A. (2008). MEMS-based Bioelectronic Neuromuscular Interfaces for Insect Cyborg Flight Control. 21st IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS 2008),Tucson, AZ, January 2008, pp. 160-163.
  • Bozkurt, A., Rosen, A., Rosen, H., Onaral, B. (2005). A Portable Near Infrared Spectroscopy System for Bedside Monitoring of Newborn Brain. Biomedical Engineering Online, 4:29.
  • Bozkurt, A., Onaral, B. (2004). Safety Assessment of Light Emitting Diodes for Continuous Wave Diffuse Optical Measurements. Biomedical Engineering Online, 3:9.

Dr. Philip BradfordPhilip Bradford
Assistant Professor
Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science
PhD (2010), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Synthesis of long carbon nanotube arrays, yarns and nonwovens made from carbon nanotubes, high volume fraction nano-composite materials, advanced textile preforms for composite materials.

Bradford received his BS in textile engineering from the College of Textiles at North Carolina State University. He received his MS degree in textile engineering while completing an MS degree in Materials Science and Engineering at NC State. He earned his PhD from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at NC State with his dissertation entitled “Advanced Materials Based on Carbon Nanotube Arrays, Yarns and Papers.”

Currently he studies millimeter long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) produced through the synthesis of carbon nanotube arrays. His research includes optimizing synthesis condi-tions and exploring new catalyst systems for increasing the growth rate and ultimate length of the tubes. He is interested in the compressive energy absorption of the carbon nanotube arrays and is developing chemical vapor deposition techniques to tune their mechanical properties. The long carbon nanotubes are also utilized in yarns and nonwoven fabrics which are then processed into high volume fraction CNT composites. Composite processing techniques and resulting microstructures are studied with the intent of developing high specific strength composite materials.

Selected Publications
  • Bradford, P., Wang, X., Zhao, H., Maria, J., Jia, Q., and Zhu, Y. 2010, “A novel approach to fabricate high volume fraction nanocomposites with long aligned carbon nanotubes” Composites. Sci. Tech.10.1016/j.compscitech.2010.07.020.
  • Bradford, P. and Bogdanovich A. 2010, “Carbon nanotube yarn and 3-D braid composites. Part II: Dynamic mechanical analysis” Composites. Part A. 41 (2), 238-246.
  • Bradford, P. and Bogdanovich, A. 2009, “Molecular Level Interactions in Carbon Nanotube Yarn – Epoxy Matrix Composites” Proceedings of 17th International Conference on Composite Materials, Edinburgh, Scotland.
  • Bradford, P. and Bogdanovich A. 2008 “Electrical conductivity study of carbon nanotube yarns, 3-D hybrid braids and their composites” J. Composite Mat.42, 1533-1545.

Dr. Aranya ChakraborttyAranya Chakrabortty
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2008), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Research Interests

Nonlinear control theory and applications to electric power systems, wide-area phasor measurement technology (WAMS), modeling and control of wind energy systems, predictability and data assimilation in large-scale power networks, networked dynamic systems.

Chakrabortty received his B.E. degree from Jadavpur University, India in 2004, and his MS and PhD degrees from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2005 and 2008, respec-tively, all in electrical engineering. From 2008-2009 he was appointed a postdoctoral research associate in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department of the University of Washington. From 2009-2010 he was a faculty member in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Texas Tech University. His research interests are in all branches of control system theory and applications, with a particular focus on electric power system networks. He is currently a part of the NSF FREEDM Systems Center at NC State and is involved with several system and control theoretic research problems for the US power grid using synchrophasor technology and its integration with renewable energy sources such as wind energy. He contributes actively to the North American Synchrophasor Initiative (NASPI), and is a member of the IEEE Control Systems Society and the IEEE Power and Energy Society.

Selected Publications
  • A. Chakrabortty and E. Scholtz, “Time-scale Separation Designs for Performance Recovery of Power Systems with Unknown Parameters and Faults,” IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, accepted.
  • A. Chakrabortty, J. H. Chow, and A. Salazar, “Interarea Model Estimation for Radial Power Systems Transfer Paths with Intermediate Voltage Control using Synchronized Phasor Measurements,” IEEE Transactions on Power Systems,vol. 24. no. 3, pp. 1318-1326, Aug. 2009.
  • A. Chakrabortty and M. Arcak, “Robust Stabilization and Performance Recovery of Nonlinear Systems with Unmodeled Dynamics,” IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 54, no. 6, pp. 1351-1356, June 2009.
  • A. Chakrabortty and M. Arcak, “Time-scale Separation Redesigns for Robust Stabilization and Performance Recovery of Uncertain Nonlinear Systems,” Automatica, vol. 45, pp 34-44, Jan. 2009.
  • J. H. Chow, A. Chakrabortty, L. Vanfretti, and M. Arcak, “Estimation of Radial Power System Transfer Path Dynamic Parameters using Synchronized Phasor Data,” IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, vol. 23, no. 2, May 2008.

Dr. Julie Ann Crowe-WilloughbyJulie Ann Crowe-Willoughby
Assistant Professor
Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science
PhD (2007), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Fundamentals of physical chemistry of surfaces and polymer physics as they apply to molecular transport of small molecules through materials such as fibers, polymer blends, and composites; harvesting energy in soft matter to enable economically-viable solar cells; and increasing the efficacy of biomedical materials for tissue engineering and implants.

Willoughby received her BS in chemical engineering from the University of Kentucky in 1992. She worked at Dow Corning Corporation for over 10 years in roles varying from process, product, and new business development to production management. In 2002, she left the corporate world to pursue her doctorate in chemical engineering at North Carolina State University. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, she was a lead research scientist at MeadWestvaco’s Center for Packaging Innovation on NC State’s Centennial Campus, where her emphasis was in the development of barrier packaging.

Willoughby’s research will have a strong connection with The Nonwovens Institute, a key program for the College of Textiles. Her research efforts are expected to provide innovation and growth to the area of nonwoven materials and their applications.

Selected Publications
  • Crowe-Willoughby, J.A., Stevens, D.R., Genzer, J., and Clarke, L.I., “Investigating the Molecular Origins of Responsiveness in Functional Silicone Elastomer Networks,” Macromolecules (2010) 43, 5043.
  • Crowe-Willoughby, J.A., Weiger, K.L., Ozcam, A.E., Genzer, J., “Formation of silicone elastomer networks,” Polymer (2010) 51, 763.
  • Crowe-Willoughby, J.A. and Genzer, J. “Formation and properties of responsive siloxane-based polymeric surfaces with tunable surface reconstruction kinetics,” Advanced Functional Materials (2009), 19(3), 460-469.
  • Crowe, J.A. and Genzer, J., “Creating Responsive Surfaces with Tailored Wettability Switching Kinetics and Reconstruction Reversibility,” Journal of the American Chemical Society (2005), 127, 17610.
  • Crowe, J.A. US Patent 6,800,713 Methods for making silicone-organic copolymers.

Dr. Hsiao-Ying Shadow HuangHsiao-Ying Shadow Huang
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2004), University of Pittsburgh

Research Interests

Thermodynamics of rechargeable battery materials, dislocations and fractures of rechargeable battery materials, organ-tissue-cell interactions in heart valves, and mechanics of biosystems.

Huang has diverse training in materials science and biomechanics. Her long-term goal is to contribute to the development of the next generation of rechargeable battery materials and to help develop a better understanding of the cell-tissue-organ micromechanics of heart valves. Before joining NC State as an assistant professor, Huang was a postdoctorate associate in materials science and engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Currently, Huang is investigating degradation mechanisms in rechargeable battery cathode materials via theoretical and computational approaches. This work could aid in developing safer, higher-capacity rechargeable batteries. Huang is also developing virtual experiments that simulate cell-tissue-organ interactions in heart valves. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of pathologies involv-ing mechanotransduction and in developing tissue-engineering strategies for tissue repair. In addition, Huang enjoys teaching and has extensive teaching experience. Collectively, she had designed and taught 19 engineering courses before joining NC State.

Selected Publications
  • Hsiao-Ying Shadow Huang, J. Liao, and M.S. Sacks, “In-situ deformation of the aortic heart valve interstitial cell nucleus under diastolic loading.” Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Vol.129, pp. 880-889, 2007.
  • W. D. Merryman, Hsiao-Ying Shadow Huang, Frederick J. Schoen, and M. S. Sacks, “The effects of cellular contraction on aortic valve leaflet stiffness.” Journal of Biomechanics. 39(1), pp. 88-96, 2006.
  • Ming Tang, Hsiao-Ying Shadow Huang, N. Meethong, Yu-Hua Kao, W. Craig Carter and Yet-Ming Chiang, “Modeling the Overpotential, Particle Size and Strain Dependence of Phase Transition Pathways in Battery Electrodes: Example in Nanoscale Olivines.’’ Chemistry of Materials, 21, pp.1557-1571, 2009.
  • N. Meethong, Hsiao-Ying Shadow Huang, W. Craig Carter and Yet-Ming Chiang, “Size-dependent lithium miscibility gap in nanoscale Li(1-x)FePO4.” Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters, 10 (5) A134-A138, 2007.
  • N. Meethong*, Hsiao-Ying Shadow Huang*, S.A. Speakman, W. Craig Carter and Yet-Ming Chiang, “Strain accommodation during phase transformation in olivine-based cathodes as a materials selection criterion for high-power rechargeable batteries.” Advanced Functional Materials, 17 (7) pp.1115-1123, 2007. *Lead authorship is shared by the first two authors.

Dr. Xiaoning JiangXiaoning Jiang
Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Adjunct Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering (Associate program)
PhD (1997), Tsinghua University

Research Interests

Micro/nano electromechanical sensors, actuators and transducers; micro/nanofabrication of smart materials and structures; high frequency bio-medical ultrasound; piezo-composite micromachined ultrasound transducer (PC-MUT); ultrasound NDE; therapeutic ultrasound; electromechanical devices for extreme environment.

Jiang received his BS in mechanical engineering from Shanghai Jiao Tong University. He received his MS in mechanical engineering from Tianjin University and a PhD in precision instruments from Tsinghua University at Beijing. He also served as a post-doctoral researcher in Nanyang Technological University and Penn State University. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was the vice president of technology at TRS Technologies, Inc.

Presently he studies PC-MUT high frequency ultrasound for biomedical and NDE imaging, therapeutic ultrasound, micro/nano-smart-structures-based novel sensors for structural health monitoring. Jiang also studies high temperature and cryogenic piezoelectric sensors, actuators and transducers for extreme environment applications.

Selected Publications
  • Jiang, X., K. Snook, R. Liu , X. Geng, and W. Hackenberger, “Fabrication and Characterization of High Frequency Phased Arrays for NDE Imaging,” SPIE Smart Materials and Structures and NDE, 7649-30, 2010.
  • Zhang, S., X. Jiang, M. Lapsley, P. Moses, and T. R. Shrout, “Piezoelectric Accelerometers for Ultrahigh Temperature Application,” Applied Physics Letters, 96, 013506 (2010).
  • Rehrig, P., X. Jiang, W. Hackenberger, J. Yuan and R. Romley, “Micromachined Imaging Transducer,” US Patent No. 7622853 (2009).
  • Toda, R., X. Jiang, K. Shcheglov, and E.H. Yang, “Linear Microactuators and Their Control Models for Mirror Shape Correction,” Journal of Micro and Nano-Mechatronics, 2009.
  • Xu, T., X. Jiang, J. Su, P. Rehrig, and W. Hackenberger, “Hybrid Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Transducer System,” US Patent No. 7446459 (2008).

Dr. Emerson Murphy-HillEmerson Murphy-Hill
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2009), Portland State University

Research Interests

The intersection of human-computer interaction and software engineering.

Murphy-Hill received his BS from The Evergreen State College. He received his PhD in computer science from Portland State University. Prior to joining NC State, he was a postdoctoral researcher in the Computer Science Department at the University of British Columbia.

He has studied how software developers restructure their programs, and what works best for restructuring. Presently, he studies how software users discover and effectively employ tools that work best for their tasks. He is also interested in the effect of human aging on the process of software development and how social networks are leveraged to improve performance in the workplace.

Selected Publications
  • An Interactive Ambient Visualization for Code Smells. Emerson Murphy-Hill and Andrew P. Black. ACM Symposium on Software Visualization. 2010.
  • A Degree-of-Knowledge Model to Capture Source Code Familiarity. Thomas Fritz, Jingwen Owen Ou, Gail Murphy, and Emerson Murphy-Hill. International Conference on Software Engineering. 2010.
  • How We Refactor, and How We Know It. Emerson Murphy-Hill, Chris Parnin, and Andrew P. Black. International Conference on Software Engineering.2009.
  • Refactoring Tools: Fitness for Purpose. Emerson Murphy-Hill and Andrew P. Black. IEEE Software. September/October 2008.

Dr. Brendan O'ConnorBrendan O’Connor
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2009), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Research Interests

Organic electronics, flexible electronics, solar cells, light-emitting devices, transistors, nanoscale energy transport and conversion.

O’Connor received his BS in mechanical engineering from Marquette University. He received his MS in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. After receiving his PhD he joined the polymers division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology as a NRC-NIST postdoctoral fellow.

At the University of Michigan his research focused on improving the performance of organic photovoltaic and light-emitting devices while introducing novel functionality. His work included the demonstration of fiber-based organic electronics, coherent light trapping in thin film solar cells, and nanoscale photodiodes for scanning optical probe microscopy. At NIST, O’Connor studied the mechanical properties of flexible organic electronics and the role of polymer semiconductor microstructure on charge transport behavior. In addition to organic electronics, his experiences include wind power site assessments, developing industrial cogeneration screening methods, and HVAC system design.

Selected Publications
  • B. O’Connor, C. Haughn, K.H. An, K.P. Pipe, M. Shtein, Transparent and conductive electrodes based on unpatterned, thin metal films. Applied Physics Letters, 93, 223304, 2008.
  • K.H. An, B. O’Connor, Y. Zhao, K.P. Pipe, M. Shtein, Scanning optical probe microscope with sub-micrometer resolution using an organic photodetector.Applied Physics Letters, 93, 033311, 2008.
  • B. O’Connor, K.P. Pipe, M. Shtein, Fiber based organic photovoltaic devices. Applied Physics Letters, 92, 193306, 2008.
  • B. O’Connor, K.H. An, Y. Zhao, K.P. Pipe, M. Shtein, Fiber-shaped organic light emitting device. Advanced Materials, 19, 3897, 2007.
  • B. O’Connor, K.H. An, Y. Zhao, K.P. Pipe, M. Shtein, Enhanced optical field intensity distribution in organic photovoltaics using external coatings. Applied Physics Letters, 89, 233502, 2006.

Dr. Gregory T. ReevesGregory T. Reeves
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
PhD (2008), Princeton University

Research Interests

Biological Engineering, analysis of developing tissues, intercellular signaling.

Reeves received his BS degrees in mathematics and in chemical engineering from the University of Florida, where he was also a four-year letter winner in swimming. He went on to perform graduate work at Princeton University with Stanislav Shvartsman, studying computational models of tissue patterning. Afterward, he was a postdoctoral scholar at the California Institute of Technology with Angelike Stathopoulos.

Reeves’ current lab investigates the dynamics and regulation of cell-to-cell communication networks in fruit fly embryos and larvae. Each network is important for the proper patterning, growth and eventual maturation of a developing fruit fly. These networks are initiated by a signal broadcast from a subset of cells in a tissue. His lab is interested in how this signal spreads, is interpreted by the cells, and how it is changed and regulated by feedback responses. All of these aspects of cell-to-cell signaling networks have strong implications for treatment of human diseases and syndromes, including cancer, inflammation, and the immune response.

  • Liberman, L. M.; Reeves, G. T. & Stathopoulos, A. (2009). Quantitative imaging of the Dorsal nuclear gradient reveals limitations to threshold-dependent patterning in Drosophila. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 106: 22317-22322. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0906227106.
  • Reeves, G. T. & Stathopoulos, A. (2009). Graded dorsal and differential gene regulation in the Drosophila embryo. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol, 1: a000836. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a000836.
  • Reeves, G. T.; Muratov, C. B.; Schüpbach, T. & Shvartsman, S. Y. (2006). Quantitative models of developmental pattern formation. Dev Cell, 11: 289-300. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2006.08.006.
  • Reeves, G. T.; Kalifa, R.; Klein, D. E.; Lemmon, M. A. & Shvartsman, S. Y. (2005). Computational analysis of EGFR inhibition by Argos. Dev Biol, 284: 523-535. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2005.05.013.

Year 2009-10

Dr. Nancy L. AllbrittonNancy L. Allbritton
Professor and Head
Joint UNC-NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering
PhD (1987), Massachusetts Institute of Technology
MD (1985), Johns Hopkins University

Research Interests

Microanalytical separation techniques to study cell signaling; Development of synthetic chemical reporters of enzyme activity; Microfabricated platforms for cell manipulation and analysis; Microfluidic systems for cell analysis.

After receiving her M.D. in 1985 and Ph.D. in 1987, Allbritton was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1988 and in the Department of Cell Biology and Neurobiology at Stanford University from 1989 to 1994. She then held the following positions at the University of California, Irvine: assistant professor, Department of Physiology and Biophysics from 1994-2000; associate professor, Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Department of Biomedical Engineering from 2000-2004; professor, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science from 2004 to 2007.

Prior to accepting the position of head of the Joint UNC-NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering, Allbritton was the Debreczeny Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, from 2007 to 2009.

Selected Publications
  • Shadpour, H., Sims, C.E., Allbritton, N.L. 2009. Enrichment and expansion of cells using antibody-coated micropallet arrays. Cytometry A. 75A: 609-618.
  • Shadpour, H., Sims, C.E., Thresher, R.J., Allbritton, N.L. 2009. Sorting and Expansion of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Colonies using Micropallet Arrays. Cytometry A. 75A: 130-139.
  • Fernandes, F., Allbritton, N.L. 2009. Effect of the DEF motif on efficiency and specificity of phosphorylation of peptide substrates of ERK. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Com. 387: 414-418.
  • Quinto-Su, P.A., Lai, H.H., Yoon, H.H., Sims, C.E., Allbritton, N.L., Venugopalan, V. 2008. Examination of laser microbeam cell lysis in a PDMS microfluidic channel using time-resolved imaging. Lab Chip. 8: 408-414.
  • Lee, K., Mwongela, S.M., Borland L.M., Nelson, A.R., Sims, C.E., Allbritton, N.L. 2008. Determination of Sphingosine Kinase Activity for Cellular Signaling Studies. Anal. Chem. 80: 1620-1627.

Dr. Dan Gabriel CacuciDan Gabriel Cacuci
Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
PhD (1978), Columbia University

Research Interests

Predictive best-estimate analysis of large-scale physical and engineering systems, large scale scientific computations, nuclear engineering (reactor multi-physics, dynamics, and safety).

Cacuci’s teaching and research experience includes appointments at the University of Tennessee, University of California at Santa Barbara, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of Virginia, University of Michigan, University of California at Berkeley, Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, the French National Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Technologies in Paris, and the University of Karlsruhe in Germany. His research and management experience at leading national research centers includes employments as senior section head at Oak Ridge National Laborator-y, institute director at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe in Germany, and scientific director of the Nuclear Energy Directorate/Sector, Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique in France.

Since 1984, Cacuci has been the editor of “Nuclear Science and Engineering—The Research Journal of the American Nuclear Society” (ANS). He is a member of the European Academy of Arts and Sciences, an honorary member of the Romanian Academy and an ANS Fellow. He has authored three books, seven book chapters, and more than 170 peer-reviewed articles. He is currently editing a comprehensive Handbook of Nuclear Engineering.

Selected Publications
  • D.G. Cacuci, Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis: Theory, Volume 1,Chapman & Hall/CRC, Boca Raton, 2003.
  • D.G. Cacuci, M. Ionescu-Bujor, and M.I. Navon; Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis: Applications to Large Scale Systems, Volume 2, Chapman & Hall/CRC, Boca Raton, 2005.
  • D.G. Cacuci, M.I. Navon, and M. Ionescu-Bujor, Computational Methods for Data Evaluation and Assimilation, Chapman & Hall/CRC, Boca Raton, 2010.
  • D.G. Cacuci (Editor), Handbook of Nuclear Engineering, Four Volumes, 34 Chapters, Springer New York / Berlin, (under contract; scheduled for 2010).
  • D.G. Cacuci and M. Ionescu-Bujor, Experimentally Validated Best-Estimate Simulation Models: A Practical Guide, Springer New York/Berlin, (under contract; scheduled for 2011).

Dr. Billy L. EdgeBilly L. Edge
Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (1969), Georgia Institute of Technology

Research Interests

Coastal processes, coastal hazards, erosion control, navigation, and dredging.

Edge comes to NC State with 25 years of combined academic experience with Clemson University and Texas A&M University. He also has 15 years of consulting experience with Dames and Moore, Cubit Engineering and Edge & Associates. At Texas A&M, he served as head of the Coastal and Ocean Division of the Zachry Department of Civil Engineering for more than 15 years. Dr. Edge also served as director of the university’s Haynes Coastal Engineering Laboratory. In addition to being a faculty member in the Department of Civil, Coastal and Environmental Engineering at NC State, he serves as a program manager for sustainable engineering with the UNC System Coastal Studies Institute in Manteo, NC.

Edge was instrumental in fielding and participating in the American Society of Civil Engineer’s (ASCE) technical assessment teams after hurricanes Katrina and Ike to study infrastructure damage. In recognition of his efforts as a member of ASCE’s External Review Panel, he was awarded the Outstanding Civilian Service Medal by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He also holds the International Coastal Engineering Award. Edge sits on the editorial board of the international journal Ocean Engineering and the journal Ocean and Coastal Management.

Selected Publications
  • M.E. Mousavi, J.L. Irish, A.E. Frey, F. Olivera, and B.L. Edge, “Global warming and hurricanes: The potential impact of hurricane intensification and sea level rise on coastal flooding,” Climate Change, in review.
  • Dean, Robert G., Julie Dean Rosati, Todd L. Walton and Billy Edge, “Erosiona Equivalences of Levees: Steady and Intermittent Wave Overtopping,” to appear in Special Katrina Issue of International Journal of Ocean Engineering,in 2009.
  • Yeh, Po-Hung, Kuang-An Chang, John Henriksen, Billy Edge, Peter Chang, Andrew Silver, Abel Vargas, “Large Scale Laboratory Experiment on Erosion of Sand Beds by Moving Circular Vertical Jets,” International Journal of Ocean Engineering, to appear 2009.
  • Park, Young H. and Billy L. Edge, “An Empirical Model to Estimate the Impact of Overwash,” Journal of Coastal Research, in publication (2009).
  • Pandoe, Wahyu and Billy L. Edge, “Cohesive Sediment Transport Model for Matagorda Bay, Texas, with Coupled ADCIRC 2D-Transport and SWAN Wave Models,” Journal of Hydraulics, ASCE, 134, pp. 303–314, March 2008.

Dr. Brian A. FloydBrian A. Floyd
Associate Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2001), University of Florida

Research Interests

Integrated systems, circuits, antennas, and packages for radios, radars, radiometers, and spectrometers operating at RF to sub-millimeter-wave frequencies.

In 2001, Floyd joined the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in New York, working on WCDMA receivers and then developing and demonstrating some of the first silicon-based millimeter-wave receivers, transmitters, and frequency synthesizers. From 2007 to 2009, Floyd managed the wireless circuits and systems group at IBM Research, focusing on phased-array circuit, antenna, package, and system development for the IBM-MediaTek 60-GHz joint development program, millimeter-wave imager development, and digitally assisted RF systems.

Floyd has authored or co-authored roughly 60 technical papers and has 11 issued patents. A member of both the steering and technical program committees of the IEEE RF Integrated Circuits Symposium, he has served on the technical advisory board to the SRC’s integrated circuits and systems science area. He was a recipient of the 2007 Pat Goldberg Memorial Award for the best paper in computer science, electrical engineering, and mathematics within IBM Research; and a recipient of the IEEE Lewis Winner Award for the best paper at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) in 2004 and 2006.

Selected Publications
  • B. Floyd, “A 16 to 18.8-GHz sub-integer-N frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz transceivers,” IEEE J. Solid-State Circuits, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 1076-1086, May 2008.
  • B. Floyd, S. Reynolds, U. Pfeiffer, T. Beukema, J. Grzyb, and C. Haymes, “A silicon 60GHz receiver and transmitter chipset for broadband communications,” IEEE ISSCC Dig. Tech. Papers, Feb. 2006, pp. 184-185 (best paper).
  • B.A. Floyd, S.K. Reynolds, U.R. Pfeiffer, T. Zwick, T. Beukema, and B. Gaucher, “SiGe bipolar transceiver circuits operating at 60 GHz,” IEEE J. Solid-State Circuits, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 156-167, Jan. 2005.
  • B.A. Floyd, S.K. Reynolds, T. Zwick, L. Khuon, T. Beukema, and U.R. Pfeiffer, “WCDMA direct-conversion receiver front-end comparison in RF-CMOS and SiGe BiCMOS,” IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech., vol. 53, no. 4, part 1, pp. 1181-1188, April 2005.
  • B.A. Floyd, C.-M. Hung, and K.K.O, “Intra-chip wireless interconnect for clock distribution implemented with integrated antennas, receivers, and transmitters,” IEEE J. Solid-State Circuits, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 543-552, May 2002.

Dr. Sarah HeckmanSarah Heckman
Teaching Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2009), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Computer science education, educational technology, software engineering education, and static analysis alert prioritization.

Heckman is a three-time graduate of the Department of Computer Science at North Carolina State University and is the first teaching assistant professor in the department. She is the founder and was the first program chair of the Symposium on Graduate Research in Computer Science, a graduate student run research symposium. Additionally, Heckman has served on the Geek-a-Thon organization committee, as president and vice president of the Women in Computer Science student organization, and as an officer-at-large in the CSC Graduate Student Association. She was selected by her peers to receive the Joyce Hatch Service Award in 2008. She is a three-time recipient of the IBM Ph.D. fellowship and interned at IBM for three years.

Selected Publications
  • S. Heckman and L. Williams, “A Model Building Process for Identifying Actionable Static Analysis Alerts,” 2nd IEEE International Conference on Software Testing, Verification and Validation (ICST 2009), Denver, CO, USA, April 1-4, 2009, pp. 161-170.
  • S. Heckman and L. Williams, “On Establishing a Benchmark for Evaluating Static Analysis Alert Prioritization and Classification Techniques,” Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Empirical Software Engineering and Measurement (ESEM 2008), Kaiserslautern, Germany, October 9-10, 2008, pp. 41-50.
  • S.S. Heckman, “Adaptively Ranking Alerts Generated from Automated Static Analysis,” ACM Crossroads, vol. 14, no. 1, Winter 2007, pp. 16-20.
  • M. Sherriff, S.S. Heckman, M. Lake, L.Williams, “Using Groupings of Static Analysis Alerts to Identify Files Likely to Contain Field Failures,” Short Paper, ACM SIGSOFT Foundations of Software Engineering, Dubrovnik, Croatia, September 3-7, 2007, pp. 565-568.

Dr. Zhenhua JiangZhenhua Jiang
Associate Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2003), University of South Carolina

Research Interests

Renewable and alternative energy sources, energy storage, power electronics, integration of distributed energy resources, microgrids, smart grids, multi-agent based modeling and control, hybrid power sources and systems, and vehicular electrical power systems.

Before joining NC State, Jiang led a group of researchers who worked on sustainable energy supply problems at the University of Miami. His research explores new ways of developing a smart, efficient electric grid and new approaches to integrating environmentally clean, distributed energy resources into existing electric power distribution systems via smart microgrids. He has been a principal investigator of grants and contracts totaling more than $1 million.

Jiang is a technical program committee chair for the IEEE PES Energy Development and Power Generation Committee and is on the editorial board of Simulation Modeling Practice and Theory. He has been a reviewer for many journals, including eight IEEE Transactions and four IET Proceedings. He has organized or chaired several conference sessions and served as a technical program committee member for over 20 conferences. He received an NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award in 2008 and was an invited participant of the 2008 U.S. “Frontiers of Engineering” Symposium organized by the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. He is a senior member of IEEE.

Selected Publications
  • Z. Jiang, “Agent-Based Power Sharing Scheme for Active Hybrid Power Sources,” Journal of Power Sources, Vol. 177, No. 1, pp. 231-238, Feb. 2008.
  • Z. Jiang, L. Gao, and R. Dougal, “Adaptive Control Strategy for Active Power Sharing in Hybrid Fuel Cell/Battery Power Sources,” IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, Vol. 22, No. 2, pp. 507-515, Jun. 2007.
  • Z. Jiang and R. Dougal, “A Compact Digitally-Controlled Hybrid Fuel Cell/Battery Power Source,” IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, Vol. 53, No. 4, pp. 1094-1104, Aug. 2006.
  • Z. Jiang, L. Gao, and R. Dougal, “Flexible Multiobjective Control of Power Converter in Active Hybrid Fuel Cell/Battery Power Sources,” IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 244-253, Jan. 2005.
  • Z. Jiang and R. Dougal, “Control Strategies for Active Power Sharing in a Fuel Cell Powered Battery-Charging Station,” IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 917-924, May 2004.

Dr. Roger NarayanRoger Narayan
Professor
Joint UNC-NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering
PhD (2002), North Carolina State University
MD (2001), Wake Forest University

Research Interests

Pulsed laser deposition and laser direct writing of microstructured and nanostructured materials for medical applications; inkjet printing and dip pen nanolithography of micro- and nano-structured structures for medical applications; antimicrobial materials; novel methods for joining of tissues; scaffold materials for tissue engineering; patient-specific medical prostheses; microscale devices for drug delivery; nanoporous materials for medical and environmental applications.

Narayan is the author of more than 100 publications and several book chapters on microscale and nanoscale processing of biological and biomedical materials. He currently serves as editor-in-chief of the journal Materials Science and Engineering C: Materials for Biological Applications. He has edited several books in the area of biomedical materials.

Narayan has served as chair of the TMS Biomaterials Committee and as editorial committee chair for Materials and Processes for Medical Devices (ASM-International). He has also organized workshops and symposia for Materials Research Society, American Ceramic Society, The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS), and Society for Biomaterials annual meetings. His honors include the NC State Sigma Xi Faculty Research Award, the UNC Jefferson-Pilot Fellowship in Academic Medicine, the National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award, and the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and ASM International.

Selected Publications
  • Doraiswamy A, Dunaway TM, Wilker JJ, Narayan RJ, Inkjet Printing of Bioadhesives, Journal of Biomedical Materials Research B, 89: 18712812: 2008.
  • Ovsianikov A, Chichkov, Mente P, Monteiro-Riviere NA, Doraiswamy A, Narayan RJ, Two Photon Polymerization of Polymer-Ceramic Hybrid Materials for Transdermal Drug Delivery, International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology, 4 (1): 22-29, 2007.
  • Jin C, Zhou H, Wei Wei, Narayan RJ, Laser Processing of Vertically Self-Organized Crystalline Gold Nanoparticles in Amorphous Alumina Matrices, Applied Physics Letters, 89, 261103, 2006.
  • Morrison ML, Buchanan RA, Liaw PK, Berry CJ, Brigmon R, Riester L, Jin C, Narayan RJ, Electrochemical and Antimicrobial Properties of Diamondlike Carbon-Metal Composite Films, Diamond and Related Materials, 15 (1): 138-146, 2006.

Dr. Gregory S. SawickiGregory S. Sawicki
Assistant Professor
Joint UNC-NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering
PhD (2007), University of Michigan

Research Interests

Biomedical bioengineering including biomechanics, biomedical imaging, control systems, mathematical modeling, musculoskeletal biomechanics, sports medicine, tissue mechanics; Intelligent systems and bioengineering, including automatic control/adaptive control, biomedical sensors, biomedical systems, medical devices, robotics, system control; Special emphasis on neuromechanics, locomotion physiology, bioinspired wearable robotics, and rehabilitation engineering.

Sawicki received his B.S. from Cornell University in 1999 and his M.S. from the University of California in 2001, focusing on mechanics, dynamics and controls with special interest in problems related to human movement. After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, he designed and tested a number of wearable robots (i.e. exoskeletons) to assist the lower-limbs during human movement. Sawicki went on to complete a post-doctoral position in integrative biology at Brown University, partially supported on an NIH F32 training fellowship, to study how elastic tendons complement muscle mechanical behavior during steady and dynamic movements.

Selected Publications
  • Sawicki G.S., Ferris D.P., (in press) “A pneumatically powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) with myoelectric activation and inhibition.” Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation. (2009)
  • Sawicki G.S., Ferris D.P., “Mechanics and energetics of incline walking with robotic ankle exoskeletons.” J Exp Biol. 212: 32-31 (2009).
  • Sawicki G.S., Ferris D.P., “Powered exoskeletons reveal the metabolic cost of plantar flexor mechanical work during walking with longer steps at constant step frequency.” J Exp Biol. 212: 21-31 (2009).
  • Sawicki G.S., Ferris D.P., “Mechanics and energetics of level walking with powered ankle exoskeletons.” J Exp Biol. 211: 1402-1413 (2008).
  • Sawicki G.S., Domingo A., Ferris DP, “The effects of powered ankle-foot orthoses on joint kinematics and muscle activation during walking in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury.” J Neuroengineering Rehabil. 3: 3 (2006).

Dr. Justin SchwartzJustin Schwartz
Kobe Steel Distinguished Professor and Head
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (1990), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests

Superconducting materials and systems, multiferroic/optical-magneto-electric thin films and devices, energetic materials, magnetic field processing of materials, and development of advanced diagnostics. Research interests are cross-disciplinary, integrating physics and chemistry of novel materials with mechanical, electrical, magnetic, thermal, and systems issues. Research bridges the underlying nanoscopic phenomena to macroscopic behaviors.

After receiving his Ph.D. in 1990, Schwartz spent six months as a visiting scientist at the National Research Institute for Metals in Tsukuba, Japan. He also joined the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of Illinois and the Science & Technology Center for Superconductivity, where he began building a research program in applied superconductivity.

In December 1993, Schwartz joined Florida State University as an associate professor of mechanical engineering and a group leader in the newly founded National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, where he led a group exploring superconducting materials and their application to high field magnets. He is a Fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and serves as the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity.

Selected Publications
  • K. Fossheim, E.D. Tuset, T.W. Ebbesen, M.M.J. Treacy and J. Schwartz, “Enhanced Flux Pinning in Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox Superconductor with Embedded Carbon Nanotubes,” Physica C 248, 195-202 (1995).
  • H.W. Weijers, U.P Trociewitz, K. Marken, M. Meinesz, H. Miao and J. Schwartz, “The generation of 25.05 T using a 5.11 T Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox superconducting insert magnet,” Superconductor Science & Technology 17 636-644 (2004).
  • D.C. van der Laan, H.J.N. van Eck, M. Dhalle, B. Metz, B. ten Haken, H.H.J. ten Kate, L.M. Naveira, M.W. Davidson and J. Schwartz, “Two- and three-dimensional connectivity and current distribution in YBa2Cu3Ox-coated conductors,” Applied Physics Letters 86 032512-1: 3 (2005).
  • X.R. Wang, U.P. Trociewitz and J. Schwartz, “Near adiabatic quench experiments on short YBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors,” Journal of Applied Physics 101(5) 053904 (2007).
  • A.L. Mbaruku and J. Schwartz, “Statistical analysis of electro-mechanical properties of AgMg sheathed Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x superconducting tapes using Weibull distributions,” Journal of Applied Physics 101(7) 073913 (2007).

Dr. Daniel D. StancilDaniel D. Stancil
Alcoa Distinguished Professor and Head
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (1981), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests

Applied electromagnetism, solid state physics, and communications. Specific research areas include microwave magnetic devices, spin waves, magneto-optic and electro-optic devices, time-reversal radar and communications, vehicle-to-vehicle wireless channels, wireless signal distribution in buildings and in enclosed spaces, antennas, cognitive radio, and nano-photonics.

Stancil began his academic career at NC State as an assistant professor in 1981. He joined the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University in 1986 as an associate professor, later becoming full professor. At Carnegie Mellon, he served as associate department head from 1992 to 1994, and as associate dean for academic affairs from 1996 to 2000. He served as the thrust director for optical data storage for the Data Storage Systems Center (a National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center) from 1996 to 1998.

Stancil received a Sigma Xi Research Award from NC State in 1985. At Carnegie Mellon, he was a leader in the development of the electrical and computer engineering department’s Virtual Laboratory that was recognized as a finalist for a 1996 Smithsonian Computerworld Award. In 1998, electro-optic scanning technology that he co-developed was recognized with an IR 100 Award and a Photonics Circle of Excellence Award. Stancil is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a past-president of the IEEE Magnetics Society.

Selected Publications
  • D.D. Stancil and A. Prabhakar, Spin Waves: Theory and Applications,Springer, 2009.
  • Lin Cheng, B.E. Henty, R. Cooper, D.D. Stancil, and Fan Bai, “A measurement study of time-scaled 802.11a waveforms over the mobile-to-mobile vehicular channel at 5.9 GHz,” IEEE Communications Magazine, v 46, n 5, pp. 84–91 (2008).
  • B.E. Henty and D.D. Stancil, “Multipath Enabled Super-Resolution for RF/Microwave Communication Using Phase-Conjugate Arrays,” Phys. Rev. Letts., 93, 243904 (2004).
  • D.D. Stancil, “Electro-optical Scanners,” Encyclopedia of Optical Engineering,Marcel Dekker, 2003.
  • A.V. Itagi, D.D. Stancil, J.A. Bain, T.E. Schlesinger, “Ridge Waveguide as a Near-Field Optical Source,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 4474 (2003).

Dr. Anka N. VelevaAnka N. Veleva
Research Associate Professor
Joint UNC-NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering
PhD (1993), Bulgarian Academy of Sciences

Research Interests

Peptide-modified biomaterials; cell-specific targeting for therapeutic angiogenesis; engineered vascular replacements; blood-material interactions.

Veleva joined the UNC-NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering in August 2009 to pursue translational research at the interface of bioengineering and biological sciences. Prior to this appointment, she held a research faculty position at NC State’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering where she developed an independent research program. Veleva is a recipient of the Royal Society Fellowship, the UNESCO/ISCU Fellowship, and the NSF/NATO Fellowship.

Veleva’s research focuses on the rational design and development of biologically active materials. Current research areas include innovative technologies for bioengineered blood vessel replacements with improved thrombogenicity and biocompatibility; molecular design, synthesis, and characterization of ligand based materials for spontaneous endogenous endothelialization; and development of new cellular and molecular tools to target tumor neovasculature. Veleva is a member of the Society for Biomaterials.

Research Interests
  • A.N. Veleva, D.E. Heath, J.K. Johnson, J. Nam, C. Patterson, J.J. Lannutti, S.L. Cooper, Interactions between Endothelial Cells and Electrospun Methacrylic Terpolymer Fibers for Engineered Vascular Replacements, J. Biomed. Mat. Research—Part A, 91A (2009) in press, DOI: 10:1002/jbm.a.32276.
  • S. Srivastava, P. Charles, X. Pi, I. Moreno, A.N. Veleva, E. Hillard, P. Lockyer, C. Patterson, J. Aitsebaomo, “Interleukin-11 has a Novel Role in Proliferation and Migration of Cultured Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Vitro and Mobilization of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Vivo”, Circulation, 118 (2008) S480.
  • A.N. Veleva, D.E. Heath, S.L. Cooper, C. Patterson, Selective Endothelial Cell Attachment to Peptide-Modified Terpolymers, Biomaterials, 29 (2008) 3656-3661.
  • A.N. Veleva, S.L. Cooper, C. Patterson, Identification and Initial Characterization of Novel Peptides Binding that Bind Specifically to Human Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells, Biotech. and Bioeng., 98 (2007) 306-312.
  • A.N. Veleva, S.A. Khan, S.L. Cooper, Oxidative and Hydrolytic Stability of a Novel Acrylic Terpolymer for Biomedical Applications, J. Biomed. Mat. Research—Part A, 74A (2005) 117-123.

Dr. Phillip R. WestmorelandPhillip R. Westmoreland
Executive Director
NC State Institute for Computational Science and Engineering
Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
PhD (1986), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests

Reaction kinetics of combustion and polymers obtained from molecular-beam mass-spectrometry experiments and computational chemistry. Clean energy from fossil and biofuels; developing fire-safe polymers, hypergolic rocket fuels, and plasma processing of microelectronics.

From 1986 to 2009, Westmoreland served on the chemical engineering faculty at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He served at NSF as program director for combustion, fire and plasma systems and divisional co-leader of cyberinfrastructure initiatives from 2006 to 2009.

A Fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), he serves on the boards of AIChE, the Combustion Institute and the Council for Chemical Research. He is a past president of the educational nonprofit CACHE Corporation and was the founding chair of AIChE’s Computational Molecular Science and Engineering Forum. He is the recipient of the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab’s David Shirley Award, AIChE’s Gary Leach Award and George Lappin Award, ASEE’s Corcoran Award, and the NSF Director’s Award for Collaborative Integration.

Selected Publications
  • N. Hansen, T.A. Cool, K. Kohse-Höinghaus, P.R. Westmoreland, “Recent Contributions of Flame-Sampling Molecular-Beam Mass Spectrometry to a Fundamental Understanding of Combustion Chemistry,” Progress in Energy and Combustion Science 35(2), 168-191 (2009).
  • M.E. Law, P.R. Westmoreland, T.A. Cool, J. Wang, N. Hansen, T. Kasper. “Benzene Precursors and Formation Routes in a Stoichiometric Cyclohexane Flame.” Proc. Combust. Inst. 31, 565-573 (2007).
  • P.R. Westmoreland, “Chemical Engineering in the Next 25 Years,” Chem. Eng. Progr, 104(11), 30-41 (2008).
  • T. Ranganathan, M. Beaulieu, J. Zilberman, K.D. Smith, P.R. Westmoreland, R.J. Farris, E.B. Coughlin, T. Emrick, “Thermal degradation of deoxybenzoin polymers studied by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry,” Polym. Degrad. Stab. 93(6), 1059-66 (2008).
  • C.A. Taatjes, N. Hansen, D.L. Osborn, K. Kohse-Höinghaus, T.A. Cool, P.R. Westmoreland. “‘Imaging’ Combustion Chemistry via Multiplexed Synchrotron-Photoionization Mass Spectrometry.” Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 20-34 (2008).

Dr. Richard A. WyskRichard A. Wysk
Dopaco Distinguished Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (1977), Purdue University

Research Interests

Computer integrated manufacturing with a special interest on automation and control, lean manufacturing and modeling of waste elimination, biomedical devices and biomimetics, and bactericidal coatings and treatments.

Wysk began his professional career with engineering positions at General Electric as production control manager and Caterpillar Tractor Company as a research analyst. He has held academic positions at Virginia Tech, Texas A&M University, and Pennsylvania State University. These positions included the Royce Wisenbaker Chair in Innovation at Texas A&M and the William Leonhard Chair in Engineering at Penn State.

Wysk has coauthored six books including Computer-Aided Manufacturing, the 1991 IIE Book of the Year and the 1991 SME Eugene Merchant Book of the Year. He has published more than 150 technical papers in journals includingTransactions of ASME, Transactions of IEEE, and IIE Transactions. Wysk is an IIE Fellow, a Fellow of SME, a member of Sigma Xi, and a member of Alpha Pi Mu and Tau Beta Phi. He is the recipient of the IIE Region III Award for Excellence, the SME Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award, the David F. Baker IIE Distinguished Research Award and the IIE Albert Holzman Distinguished Educator Award. He also received the Army Bronze Star and two Army Commendation Medals for his service in Vietnam.

Selected Publications
  • Lee, Seungyub, Son, Young-Jun and Wysk, Richard A., “Simulation-based planning and control: From shop floor to top floor,” Journal of Manufacturing Systems, 2008, Vol. 26, No. 2., pp. 85-98.
  • Altuntas, Bertan, Wysk, R.A. and Rothrock, Ling, “A Formal Approach to include a human material handler in a CIM System,” International Journal of Production Research, Vol. 45, No. 9, pp. 1953-1971, 2007.
  • Kim, N., Shin, D., Rothrock and Wysk, R.A., “Using Finite State Automata for Human Modeling of Affordances in Human-Machine Cooperative Sysyetms,” International Journal of Production Research, 21 (08).
  • Shin, Dongmin, Wysk, R.A., and Rothrock, L., 2006, “A Formal Control Theoretic Model of Human-Automation Interactive Manufacturing System Control,” International Journal of Production Research, Vol 44, No. 20, pp. 4273-4296.

Dr. Huiyang ZhouHuiyang Zhou
Associate Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2003), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Computer architecture with special interests in high-performance micro-architecture, low-power architecture, DSP architecture, media processing architecture, general purpose computation on graphics processor units (GPGPU), architectural support for reliability, architectural support for security, back-end compiler design, code optimization, interaction between compilers and computer architecture, and embedded systems.

Zhou received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Xian Jiaotong University, China in 1992, and his Ph.D. in computer engineering from NC State in 2003. Before joining the NC State faculty, Zhou served as assistant professor in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Central Florida. His research focuses on high performance micro-architecture, low-power design, architecture support for system dependability, and backend compiler optimization. He is a recipient of the NSF Faculty Early Career Development award and a senior member of the IEEE.

Selected Publications
  • M. Dimitrov and H. Zhou, “Anomaly-based Bug Prediction, Isolation, and Validation: An Automated Approach for Software Debugging,” The 14th International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems (ASPLOS-XIV), Mar. 2009.
  • J. Kong, O. Acricmez, J.-P. Seifert and H. Zhou, “Hardware-Software Integrated Approaches to Defend Against Software Cache-based Side Channel Attacks,” The 15th International Symposium on High Performance Computer Architecture (HPCA-15), Feb. 2009.
  • H. Gao, Y. Ma, M. Dimitrov, and H. Zhou, “Address-Branch Correlation: A Novel Locality for Long-Latency Hard-to-Predict Branches,” The 14th International Symposium on High Performance Computer Architecture (HPCA-14), pp. 74-85, Feb. 2008.
  • Y. Ma, H. Gao, M. Dimitrov, and H. Zhou, “Optimizing Dual-Core Execution for Power Efficiency and Transient-Fault Recovery,” IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. 1080-1093, Aug. 2007.
  • H. Zhou, “Dual-Core Execution: Building a Highly Scalable Single-Thread Instruction Window,” Proceedings of the 2005 International conference on Parallel Architectures and Compilation Techniques (PACT’05), pp. 231-242. Sept. 2005.

Year 2008-09

Dr. Yousry AzmyYousry Azmy
Professor and Head
Department of Nuclear Engineering
PhD (1985), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research Interests

Nuclear computational science with focus on neutron transport and diffusion methods and analysis; iterative acceleration methods for neutron transport methods; multiprocessing algorithm development, implementation, analysis, and parallel-performance modeling; development and analysis of numerical methods for fluid flow; and numerical analysis of nonlinear dynamics phenomena with application to stability and bifurcation analyses.

After receiving his PhD in 1985, Azmy took a one-year position as research assistant professor in the Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics Department at the University of Virginia at Charlottesville. Over the following 16 years he ascended the ranks of the research ladder while focusing his research on issues in nuclear computational science, particularly on aspects of the numerical solution of the neutron transport equation.

In July 2002, he resigned his senior scientist position at Oak Ridge National Labs to become professor of nuclear engineering in the Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering at Penn State University, where he led a group of graduate students exploring various computational and applied problems in nuclear science and engineering. Azmy is member of the American Nuclear Society (since 1985), SIAM (since 2000), the American Mathematical Society (since 2001), and the American Society for Engineering Education (since 2005). Azmy also sits on the editorial board of the international journal Progress in Nuclear Energy.

Selected Publications
  • Y. Y. Azmy, “A State Space Search Technique for Optimizing the Shape of a Cold Neutron Source,” Nuclear Science & Engineering 105, 174 (1990).
  • Y. Y. Azmy, “Arbitrarily High Order Characteristic Methods for Solving the Neutron Transport Equation,” Annals of Nuclear Energy 19, 593 (1992). [Invited]
  • Y. Y. Azmy, “Multiprocessing for Neutron Diffusion and Deterministic Transport Methods,” Progress in Nuclear Energy 31, 317 (1997). [Invited]
  • Y. Y. Azmy, “Unconditionally Stable and Robust Adjacent-Cell Diffusive Preconditioning of Weighted-Difference Particle Transport Methods is Impossible,” Journal of Computational Physics 182, 213 (2002).
  • J. I. Duo, Y. Y. Azmy, “Error Comparison of Diamond Difference, Nodal and Characteristics Methods for Solving Multidimensional Transport Problems with the Discrete Ordinates Approximation,” Nuclear Science & Engineering 156, 139 (2007).

Dr. Christopher BobkoChristopher Bobko
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2006), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests

Mechanics of materials, specifically experimental micromechanics, including advanced nanoindentation techniques, applications to complex porous materials encountered in civil engineering and long-term material strength and sustainability.

Bobko earned his PhD in structures and materials from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Bobko also received his MS at MIT after completing a BSE in civil and environmental engineering at Princeton University. Working with Dr. Franz-Josef Ulm at MIT, Bobko’s dissertation research focused on assessing the nanogranular mechanical behavior of shale through nanoindentation.

Bobko’s research combines small-scale experimental techniques with multiscale modeling of the complex porous composite materials, including cements, rocks and fiber-reinforced composites, often encountered in civil engineering. The overall goal of Bobko’s research program is the application of new fundamental understanding of civil engineering materials for the improvement of engineering performance, including durability and sustainability, at large scales.

Selected Publications
  • Bobko, C., Gathier, B., Borges, L., Ulm, F.-J. (2008) “The nanogranular origin of friction and cohesion in shale—a strength homogenization approach to interpretation of nanoindentation results.” (under revision)
  • Miller, M., Bobko, C., Vandamme, M., and Ulm, F.-J. (2008) “Surface roughness criteria for cement paste nanoindentation.” Cement and Concrete Research 38 (4): 467-476.
  • Bobko, C., and Ulm, F.-J., (2008) “The nano-mechanical morphology of shale.” Mechanics of Materials 40: 318-337.
  • Ulm, F.-J., Vandamme, M., Bobko, C., Ortega, J.A., Tai, K. and Ortiz, C. (2007) “Statistical indentation techniques for hydrated nanocomposites: concrete, bone, and shale.” Journal of the American Ceramic Society. 90 (9) 2677-2692.
  • Abousleiman, Y., Tran, M., Hoang, S., Bobko, C., Ortega, J.A., and Ulm, F.J. (2007) “Geomechanics field and lab characterization of woodford shale: The next gas play.” Proceedings from ATCE 2007: SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, Anaheim, CA, 11-14 November 2007.

Dr. Joseph F. DeCarolisJoseph F. DeCarolis
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2004), Carnegie Mellon University

Research Interests

Interdisciplinary assessments of energy technology and public policy, development and application of optimization models to analyze energy issues, life-cycle assessment, and robust decision-making under conditions of uncertainty.

Prior to joining the NC State faculty, DeCarolis was an environmental scientist in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development. He received his PhD in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon and his dissertation focused on the economic feasibility and environmental impacts of large-scale wind power.

He works on global energy issues at the intersection of engineering, economics and public policy. The goal of his research is to promote long-term sustainability by conducting interdisciplinary, problem-driven analysis. Previous research topics have included the climatic impact of wind turbines, the cost of large-scale wind power, the emission reduction benefits of renewable energy credits, and the development of advanced nuclear power plants in the U.S.

Selected Publications
  • J.F. DeCarolis and D.W. Keith. (2006). “The economics of large scale wind power in a carbon constrained world.” Energy Policy, 34: 395-410.
  • J.F. DeCarolis and D.W. Keith. (2005). “The costs of wind’s variability: Is there a threshold?” The Electricity Journal, 18 (1): 69-77.
  • D.W. Keith, J.F. DeCarolis, D.C. Denkenberger, D.H. Lenschow, S.L. Malyshev, S. Pacala, and P.J. Rasch. (2005). “The influence of large-scale wind-power on global climate.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 101 (46): 16115-16120.
  • J.F. DeCarolis and D.W. Keith. (2001). “The real cost of wind energy.” Science, 294 (5544): 1000-1001.
  • J.F. DeCarolis, R.L. Goble, C. Hohenemser. (2000). “Searching for energy efficiency on campus—Clark University’s 30-year quest.” Environment, 42 (4): 8-20.

Dr. Michael DickeyMichael Dickey
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
PhD (2006), University of Texas, Austin

Research Interests

Micro- and nanotechnology, microfluidics, soft materials, nanoelectronics, photovoltaics.

Dickey received his BS in chemical engineering in 1999 from the Georgia Institute of Technology and then worked for two years at Merck in the chemical engineering department. He received a PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 2006 under his advisor, Professor C. Grant Willson. He recently completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Professor George M. Whitesides at Harvard University in the Department of Chemistry. Dickey is interested in studying new materials and methods for micro- and nano-fabrication. The goal of this work is to understand the fundamental properties of materials and to use them to form tools and functional devices such as nanoelectronics, microfluidic systems, solar cells, and photonic structures.

Selected Publications
  • M.D. Dickey, E.A. Weiss, E.A. Smythe, R.C. Chiechi, F. Capasso, G.M. Whitesides, “Fabrication of Arrays of Metal and Metal-Oxide Nanotubes by Shadow Evaporation,” ACS Nano, 2008. 2(4): p. 800-8.
  • M.D. Dickey, R.C. Chiechi, R.J. Larsen, E.A. Weiss, D.A. Weitz, G.M. Whitesides, “Eutectic Gallium-Indium (EGaIn): A Liquid Metal Alloy for the Formation of Stable Structures in Microchannels at Room Temperature,” Advanced Functional Materials, 2008. 18(7): p. 1097-1104.
  • M.D. Dickey, A. Raines, E. Collister, R. Bonnecaze, S.V. Sreenivasan, R.T. Bonnecaze, and C.G. Willson, “High-aspect Ratio Polymeric Pillar Arrays Formed Via Electrohydrodynamic atterning,” Journal of Materials Science, 2008. 43(1): p. 117-22.
  • M. D. Dickey, S. Gupta, K.A. Leach, E. Collister, C.G. Willson, and T. P. Russell, “Novel 3-D structures in polymer films by coupling external and internal fields,” Langmuir, 2006. 22(9): p. 4315-4318.
  • M.D. Dickey, E. Collister, A. Raines, P. Tsiartas, T. Holcombe, S.V. Sreenivasan, R.T. Bonnecaze, and C.G. Willson, “Photocurable pillar arrays formed via electrohydrodynamic instabilities,” Chemistry of Materials, 2006. 18(8): p. 2043-2049.

Dr. Jingyan DongJingyan Dong
Assistant Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD ( 2006), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research Interests

Micro/nano manufacturing, flexible manufacturing systems, multi-scale mechatronics, sensing and control, parallel kinematic mechanisms, nano-positioning, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) for manufacturing and bio-testing applications, biomedical manufacturing.

Prior to joining the NC State faculty, Dong was a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Nanoscale Chemical-Electrical-Mechanical Manufacturing Systems (Nano-CEMMS) and a lecturer in the Department of Industrial and Enterprise Systems Engineering in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he received his PhD from the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering in 2006.

He received a BS in automatic control from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in 1998 and an MS in manufacturing automation from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2001. Dong’s research interests include micro/nano manufacturing, multi-scale mechatronics and manufacturing systems, instrumentation, sensing, control and optimization, and their application in micro/nano manipulation and manufacturing, biomedical manufacturing, bio testing and characterization etc.

Selected Publications
  • J. Dong, D. Mukhopadhyay, P.M. Ferreira, “Design, fabrication and testing of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MEMS parallel kinematics XY stage,” Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 17, 1154-1161 (2007).
  • J. Dong, S.M. Salapaka, P.M. Ferreira, “Robust control of a parallel kinematic nano-positioner,” ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control, 130(4), 041007 (15 pp) (2008).
  • J. Dong, C. Yuan, J.A. Stori, P.M. Ferreira, “Development of a high-speed 3-axis machine tool using a novel parallel-kinematics X-Y table,” International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture, 44, 1355-1371, (2004).
  • J. Dong, J.A. Stori, “Optimal feed-rate scheduling for high-speed contouring,” ASME Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, 129(1), 63-76 (2007).
  • Q. Yao, J. Dong, P.M. Ferreira, “Design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a piezo-driven parallel-kinematics micropositioning XY stage,” International Journal of Machine Tools & Manufacture, 47(6), 946-961 (2007).

Dr. Scott FergusonScott Ferguson
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2008), State University of New York at Buffalo

Research Interests

Design theory, reconfigurability, and multidisciplinary/multiobjective optimization

Ferguson’s research addresses the science of engineering design, an emerging research area. His current work addresses the formulation of system performance trade-offs, complexity in system-of-system design, the impact and challenges of reconfigurability, and the role of decision theory in design and optimization.

Having arrived at NC State in the fall of 2008, Ferguson is presently developing a new graduate-level class in engineering design and optimization. He also teaches undergraduate classes such as Engineering Dynamics and Introduction to Space Flight. Outside of work, Ferguson spends time with family and friends and enjoys ice hockey as a player and a spectator.

Selected Publications
  • S. Ferguson, E. Kasprzak, and K. Lewis, “Designing a family of reconfigurable vehicles using multilevel multidisciplinary design optimization, structural and multidisciplinary optimization;” SpringerLink, October 22, 2008.
  • S. Ferguson, K. Lewis, A. Siddiqi, and O. de Weck, “Flexible and reconfigurable systems: nomenclature and review,” ASME design engineering technical conferences, design automation conference, Las Vegas, NV, DETC2007/DAC-35745, 2007.
  • S. Ferguson and K. Lewis, “Effective development of reconfigurable systems using linear state-feedback control,” AIAA Journal, Vol. 44, No. 4, 868-878, 2006.
  • S. Ferguson, A. Gurnani, J. Donndelinger, and K. Lewis, “A study of convergence and mapping in preliminary vehicle design,” International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modeling and Testing, Vol. 1, No. 1/2/3, 192-215, 2005.
  • A. Gurnani, S. Ferguson, J. Donndelinger, and K. Lewis, “A constraint-based approach to feasibility assessment in conceptual design,” Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing, Special Issue on Constraints and Design, Vol. 20, No. 4, 351-367, 2005.

Dr. Marc HoitMarc Hoit
Vice Chancellor for Information Technology & Chief Information Officer
Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (1983), University of California, Berkeley

Research Interests

Finite element analysis, computer software development and optimization, computational structural mechanics, nonlinear structural analysis, effective teaching methods, and structural optimization.

Hoit is an active researcher with a balanced portfolio that contains research activities and funding in both disciplinary work in the application of IT to the civil engineering field and engineering educational activities including educational reform and improved learning activities.

His discipline research has led to the creation of the Florida Bridge Software Institute. This is a University Institute that acts as a link between civil engineering transportation research and IT applications that help improve the technology of the field. The institute is currently involved in developing and licensing software that automates and enhances the analysis and design of bridges. The institute develops and manages the Florida State Department of Transportation database, which is the repository for all transportation-related data. This stems from his research and leadership in the use of XML and schemas to develop an international standard for information interchange.

Selected Publications
  • Hoit, M., Consolazio, Gary, Finite Element, Chapter 13, Handbook of Dynamic System Modeling, CRC press, Edited Paul Fishwick, 2007.
  • Marc Hoit, “Hammering Out an IT Reorganization,” Edu-Tech Higher Education, November, 2006.
  • Scot Weaver, Thomas Lefchik, Kirk Beach, Marc Hoit, “Geoenvironmental and Geotechnical Data Exchange: Setting the Standard,” Geocongress, New Orleans, 2008.
  • Chris Bray, Roger Chandler, Steve Wathall, Marc Hoit, Thomas Lefchik, “Extending the Geotechnical Dictionary. Best Practice for Customizing the International Framework for Geotechnical Data,” Geocongress, New Orleans, 2008.
  • Marc Hoit, Mark Styler, Mike McVay, “The DIGGS Standard and Piling (v1),” Geo-Engineering Data: Representation and Standardization, September 9, 2006, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.

Dr. Douglas IrvingDouglas Irving
Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2004), University of Florida

Research Interests

Multi-scale and atomistic simulation of interfacial degradation, thermal and mass transport, lubrication, and wear mechanisms; first principles simulation of optoelectronic properties, heterogeneous interfaces, surfaces, ultrathin films, and degradation mechanisms.

Irving received his BS in physics in 1997 at Furman University. He received his MS in 2002 and PhD in 2004 in materials science and engineering from the University of Florida. His recent research has focused on the use of large-scale molecular simulation, continuum modeling, and multi-scale coupled atomistic and continuum methods to study materials under extreme conditions. To study materials under high electromagnetic stress, he co-developed a massively parallel multi-scale computer code that has been used to study degradation of metallic contacts in railguns and radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). In addition to his experience in large-scale simulation methods, Irving also has extensive experience in the use of ab initio methods. He has applied these methods to understand the stability of ultrathin metallic films due to quantum confinement and to predict the optical absorption and emission of novel oligomer systems intended for use in either organic photovoltaics or light emitting diodes.

Selected Publications
  • O. Rezvanian, C. Brown, M. A. Zikry, A. I. Kingon, J. Krim, D. L. Irving, and D. W. Brenner, “The Role of Creep in the Time-Dependent Resistance of Ohmic Gold Contacts in RF-MEMS Devices,” Journal of Applied Physics, 104, 024513 (2008).
  • D. L. Irving and S. B. Sinnott, “Calculated Optical Absorption and Emissions from Poly p-Phenylene Oligomers,” Journal of Luminescence, 126, 278, (2007).
  • D. W. Brenner, D. L. Irving, A. I. Kingon, J. Krim, and C. W. Padgett, “Multiscale analysis of liquid lubrication trends from industrial machines to micro-electrical-mechanical systems,” Langmuir, 23, 9253 (2007).
  • D. L. Irving and D. W. Brenner, “Diffusion on a Self-Assembled Monolayer: Molecular Modeling of a Bound + Mobile Lubricant,” Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 110, 31, 15426 (2006).
  • D. L. Irving, S. B. Sinnott, “Relative stabilities of Ag multilayers on GaAs and GaSb determined from ab initio calculations,” and Richard F. Wood, Physical Review B, 74, 195403 (2006).

Dr. Xuxian JiangXuxian Jiang
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2006), Purdue University

Research Interests

System security, malware investigation and defense.

Jiang received his BS in computer science in July 1998 from Xi’an Jiaotong University, China and his PhD in computer science in August 2006 from Purdue University. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he spent two years on the faculty in the Department of Information and Software Engineering at George Mason University. Jiang’s research interests are system security and malware defense with recent focuses on the development of virtualization technologies for computer system security and for virtual distributed computing. The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) through the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), and the Secure Open Systems Initiative (SOSI) have supported Jiang’s research.

Selected Publications
  • Ryan Riley, Xuxian Jiang, Dongyan Xu, “Guest-Transparent Prevention of Kernel Rootkits with VMM-based Memory Shadowing,” Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Intrusion Detection (RAID 2008), Boston, MA, September 2008. (Best Paper Award)
  • Zhiqiang Lin, Xuxian Jiang, Dongyan Xu, Xiangyu Zhang, “Automatic Protocol Format Reverse Engineering Through Context-Aware Monitored Execution,” Proceedings of the 15th Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS 2008), San Diego, CA, February 2008.
  • Xuxian Jiang, Xinyuan Wang, Dongyan Xu, “Stealthy Malware Detection Through VMM-Based ‘Out-of-the-Box’ Semantic View Reconstruction,” Proceedings of the 14th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS 2007), Alexandria, VA, November 2007.
  • Yi-Min Wang, Doug Beck, Xuxian Jiang, Roussi Roussev, Chad Verbowski, Shuo Chen, Sam King, “Automated Web Patrol with Strider HoneyMonkeys: Finding Web Sites That Exploit Browser Vulnerabilities,” Proceedings of the 13th Annual Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS 2006), San Diego, CA, February 2006.
  • Xuxian Jiang, Dongyan Xu, “Collapsar: A VM-Based Architecture for Network Attack Detention Center,” Proceedings of the 13th USENIX Security Symposium (Security ‘04), San Diego, CA, August 2004.

Dr. Srdjan LukicSrdjan Lukic
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2007), Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago

Research Interests

Power electronics and motor drives for renewable energy and automotive applications.

Lukic received his MS and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), Chicago, in 2004 and 2007, respectively. Between 2002 and 2004, he worked as the electrical development engineer at Firefly Energy Inc. a spin-off of Caterpillar Inc., where he was responsible for optimizing carbon/graphite foam-based lead acid batteries for utility and automotive applications.

Selected Publications
  • S. M. Lukic and A. Emadi, “Batteries for electric, hybrid electric, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles,” IEEE Industrial Electronics Magazine, in press.
  • S. M. Lukic, J. Cao, R. C. Bansal, F. Rodriguez, and A. Emadi, “Energy storage systems for automotive applications,” IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, vol. 55, no. 6, pp. 2258-2267, June 2008.
  • S. S. Williamson, S. M. Lukic, and A. Emadi, “Comprehensive drive train efficiency analysis of hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles based on motor-controller efficiency modeling,” IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 730-740, May 2006.
  • A. Emadi, K. Rajashekara, S. S. Williamson, and S. M. Lukic, “Topological overview of hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicular power systems,” IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 763-770, October 2004.
  • S. M. Lukic and A. Emadi, “Effects of drivetrain hybridization on fuel economy and dynamic performances of parallel hybrid electric vehicles,” IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, vol. 53, no. 2, pp. 385-389, March 2004.

Dr. Anatoli MelechkoAnatoli Melechko
Associate Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2001), University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Research Interests

Carbon nanostructures, alloy nanoparticles, nanobio interfacing, nanobiotechnology, catalytic synthesis, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, nanofabrication, thin films.

Melechko received his PhD in physics from University of Tennessee at Knoxville and his MS in physics from Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Russia. He came to NC State after three years at the Oak Ridge National Lab, where he was a staff member in Materials Science and Technology and the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences divisions. His primary research focus is on the catalytic co-synthesis of carbon nanostructures and other nanostructured materials. Nanostructures are at the confluence of the smallest of human-made devices and the largest molecules of living systems. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers have ideal properties for sensing, probing, and material delivery via their insertion into live cells. One of the central directions of his research is to develop methods for synthesis and the molecular-scale physical and informational interfacing between intracellular domains and synthetic nanostructures to study and influence cellular functions.

Selected Publications
  • Melechko, A.V., V.I. Merkulov, T.E. McKnight, M.A. Guillorn, K.L. Klein, D.H. Lowndes, and M.L. Simpson, “Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers and related structures: Controlled synthesis and directed assembly.” Journal of Applied Physics, 2005. 97(4): 041301.
  • McKnight, T.E., A.V. Melechko, D.K. Hensley, D.G.J. Mann, G.D. Griffin, and M.L. Simpson, “Tracking gene expression after DNA delivery using spatially indexed nanofiber arrays.” Nano Letters, 2004. 4(7): p. 1213-1219.3.
  • Melechko, A.V., J. Braun, H.H. Weitering, and E.W. Plummer, “Two-dimensional phase transition mediated by extrinsic defects.” Physical Review Letters, 1999. 83(5): p. 999-1002.
  • Melechko, A.V., K.L. Klein, J.D. Fowlkes, D.K. Hensley, I.A. Merkulov, T.E. McKnight, P.D. Rack, J.A. Horton, and M.L. Simpson, “Control of carbon nanostructure: From nanofiber toward nanotube and back.” Journal of Applied Physics, 2007. 102(7): p. 074314-7.
  • Mann, D.G.J., T.E. McKnight, J.T. McPherson, P.R. Hoyt, A.V. Melechko, M.L. Simpson, and G.S. Sayler, “Inducible RNA interference-mediated gene silencing using nanostructured gene delivery arrays.” ACS Nano, 2008. 2(1): p. 69-76.

Dr. Alexei V. SavelievAlexei V. Saveliev
Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (1988), Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Research Interests

Non-thermal plasmas, environmental and biomedical applications of plasmas, plasma and flame synthesis of nanomaterials, advanced energy systems.

Saveliev received his BS and MS degrees in physics and engineering and his PhD degree in chemical physics and reacting flows from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (also known as the Russian MIT). Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he spent several years as a research professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Prior to joining UIC, he was a visiting professor at the Ohio State University and a principal scientist at Lykov’s Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer, Minsk, Belarus. Saveliev’s current research interests involve applications of non-thermal plasma for pollution control and material processing, synthesis and functionalization of carbon and transition metal oxide nanomaterials, hydrogen generation, fuel reforming and gasification.

Selected Publications
  • W. Merchan-Merchan, A.V. Saveliev, A.M. Taylor, “High rate flame synthesis of highly crystalline iron oxide nanorods,” Nanotechnology, 19: 125605-9 (2008).
  • E. Lock, W. Merchan-Merchan, J. D’Arcy, A.V. Saveliev, L.A. Kennedy, “Coating of inner and outer carbon nanotube surfaces with polymers in supercritical CO2,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 111: 13655-13658 (2007).
  • S. Som, A.I. Ramírez, J. Hagerdorn, A.V. Saveliev, S.K. Aggarwal, “A numerical and experimental study of counterflow syngas flames at different pressures,” Fuel, 87: 319-334 (2008).
  • E. Lock, A.V. Saveliev, L.A. Kennedy,“Initiation of pulsed corona discharge under supercritical conditions,” IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 33: 850-853 (2005).
  • O. Mutaf-Yardimci, A.V. Saveliev, A.A. Fridman, and L.A. Kennedy,“Thermal and non-thermal regimes of gliding arc discharge in air flow,” Journal of Applied Physics, 87: 1632-1641 (2000).

Dr. Thomas WardThomas Ward
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2003), University of California, Santa Barbara

Research Interests

Fluid mechanics and heat transfer in microscale systems electrohydrodynamics and electrohydrostatics of electrically and thermally insulating liquid, dynamical systems approaches to understanding fluid mixing.

Ward received his BS in chemical engineering from the Missouri University of Science and Technology. He received his MS in chemical engineering from Stanford University and a PhD in mechanical engineering from University of California at Santa Barbara. He was a postdoctoral researcher in the Division of Engineering and Applied Science at Harvard University. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was an assistant adjunct professor of mathematics and postdoctoral researcher in the Applied Math Lab at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Presently he studies the convective transport of electrically and thermally insulating liquids in microscale geometries to enhance heat and/or mass transport and also microscale fluid transport driven by electrohydrodynamic and electrohydrostatic flow control. Ward also studies the production of droplets in microfluidic devices using novel pressure driven flow control systems. Another topic is the study of using viscous Newtonian liquid as adhesive. All of these topics are investigated using both theory and experimental techniques.

Selected Publications
  • Ward, T. 2008, “Electrohydrostatically driven flow and instability in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell.” Langmuir 24, 3611-3620.
  • Ward, T. and Metchik, A. 2007, “Viscous fluid mixing in a tilted rotating tank.” Chemical Engineering Science 62 (12), 6274-6284.
  • Ward, T. 2007 “Electrohydrostatic adhesion of rigid-planar electrodes.” J. Electrostat. 65 (12), 742-749.
  • Ward, T. & Homsy G. M. 2006, “Electrohydrodynamically driven chaotic streamlines in a translating drop.” J. Fluid Mech. 547, 215-230.
  • Ward, T, Faivre, M., Abkarian, M., & Stone, H. A. 2005, “Drop size and scaling in microfluidic flow-focusing pressure vs. flow-rate driven pumping.” Electrophoresis 26, 3716-3724.

Dr. Cranos WilliamsCranos Williams
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2008), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Systems biology, nonlinear systems analysis, system identification, bounded uncertainty analysis, biological signal and data processing.

Williams received his BS in electrical engineering from North Carolina A&T State University and his MS and PhD in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University.  He has received several awards and honors, including the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, the NASA Harriett G. Jenkins Pre-doctoral Fellowship, and the National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering and Science (GEM) doctoral and master’s fellowships. He has also participated in several scholarly activities, including multidisciplinary research proposals, technical presentations at professional conferences, invited talks, and a guest lecture for a course on systems biology.

His current research program focuses on the development, reformulation, and implementation of engineering-based tools that can model multiple scales and multiple levels of interacting cellular processes in a system of systems infrastructure. Specific interests in this field include nonlinear systems analysis, nonlinear system identification, uncertainty analysis, optimal experimental design, and biological signal and data processing.

Selected Publications
  • C. Williams, W. Alexander, and W. Edmonson, “Optimal Control Formulation of Constrained Least-Squares Estimation for Biochemical Pathway Estimation,” in Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Systems Biology, October 2007.
  • W. Edmonson, S. Ocloo, C. Williams, and W. Alexander, “The Use of Interval Methods in Signal Processing and Control for Systems Biology,” in Proceedings of the 1st IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computational Intelligence, April 2007, pp. 136-142.
  • C. Williams, W. Alexander, W. Edmonson, “Estimating the Unmeasured Dynamics of Biological Systems Using a Constrained Real-Coded Genetic Algorithm,” in Proc. IEEE 40th ASILOMAR Conf. on Signals, Systems, and Computers, 2006.
  • N. Cahill, C. Williams, S. Chen, L. Ray, and M. Goodgame, “Incorporating Spatial Information into Entropy Estimates to Improve Multimodal Image Registration,” IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, April 2006.
  • C. Williams, W. Alexander, and T. Pompey, “Independent and Principal Component Analyses of the Global Stress Response of Bacillus subtilis,IEEE International Workshop on Genomic Signal Processing and Statistics, May 2005.

Year 2007-08

Dr. Hany Abdel-KhalikHany Abdel-Khalik
Assistant Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
PhD (2004), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Nuclear reactor theory, core design methods for reactor systems, simulation tools to perform research tasks such as characterization of uncertainties and their sources in reactor states, production of guidance for future experimental reduction of uncertainties, and development of robust adaptive simulation strategies to enhance agreement between measured and predicted reactor states.

Abdel-Khalik received his BS (2000) in Nuclear Engineering from Alexandria University (Egypt), and his MS (2002) and PhD (2004) also in Nuclear Engineering, both from NC State. His current work focuses on the improvement of core design methods for current and advanced reactor systems.

His work with nuclear reactor physics theory recognizes the economic challenges facing current and future design and development. His research focuses on the ability of simulation tools to not only predict basic reactor states but also perform different engineering and research-oriented tasks.  Abdel-Khalik is currently working on the development of Efficient Subspace Methods, which are intended to reduce the associated computational efforts to an acceptable level, enabling execution with both accuracy and efficiency.

Selected Publications
  • Hany S. Abdel-Khalik and Paul J. Turinsky, “Evaluation of Core Attributes Uncertainties Due to Input Data Uncertanties,” Transactions of American Nuclear Society, San Diego, 92, 2005.
  • Paul J. Turinsky, Paul M. Keller, and Hany S. Abdel-Khalik, “Evolution of Nuclear Fuel Management and Reactor Operational Aid Tools,” Nuclear Engineering and Technology, 37(1), 2005.
  • Hany S. Abdel-Khalik and Paul J. Turinsky, “Adaptive Core Simulation Employing Discrete Inverse Theory, Part I: Theory, and Part II: Numerical Experiments,” Nuclear Technology, 151, No. 1, 2005.
  • Hany S. Abdel-Khalik and Paul J. Turinsky, “Adaptive Core Simulation: Efficient Sensitivity Analysis,” Advances In Nuclear Fuel Management III, Hilton Head, SC, 2003.
  • Hany S. Abdel-Khalik and Paul J. Turinsky, “Inverse Method Applied to Adaptive Core Simulation,” Transactions of American Nuclear Society, 86, 2002.

Dr. Benjamin L. BrownBenjamin L. Brown
Senior Research Associate
Department of Nuclear Engineering
PhD (1987), Brandeis University

Research Interests

Development of a Positronium (Ps) lifetime spectrometers, Positron confinement at liquid helium temperatures and in high (6T) magnetic fields, production of monoenergetic Ps, galactic positron annihilation process with positrons and gravitational wave research.

Prior to joining the NC State faculty, Brown served as professor and department head in the physics department at Principia College.  He also taught physics at Mount Holyoke College. Brown has received research grants from the Peninsula Foundation, National Science Foundation, Research Corporation and the Sigma Pi Sigma physics honors society. Brown also formed the research company Positron Resources Incorporated with support from a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the Department of Energy. Brown spent 12 years at Bell Laboratories, ultimately as a member of the technical staff. At Bell Labs, he did research in gravity waves, positron physics, laboratory astrophysics and optical astronomy.

Brown has over 30 published papers relating to experimental work in astrophysics, atomic physics and surface physics. He was IBM postdoctoral fellow and research associate at Harvard University, and received Principia’s Physical Science Award for his senior research thesis in astronomy. He is a member of the American Physical Society, American Astronomical Society, American Association of Physics Teachers, Sigma Xi and Sigma Pi Sigma.

Selected Publications
  • R.H. Howell, T.E. Cowan, J. Hartley, P. Sterne, and B.L. Brown, “Positron Beam Lifetime Spectroscopy of Atomic Scale Defect Distributions in Bulk and Microscopic Volumes,” Applied Surface Science (1996).
  • L. D. Hulett, Jr., B.L. Brown, et al., editors, “Application of Positron Spectroscopy to Materials Science,” Adv. Mat. Sci. 3, 1 (1994).
  • B.L. Brown, G. Gabrielse, L. Haarsma and K. Abdulah, “Antihydrogen Production at Low Energies,” Hyperfine Interactions 73, 193 (1992).
  • M.H. Weber, S. Tang, S. Berko, B.L. Brown, K.F. Canter, K.G. Lynn, A.P. Mills, Jr., L.O. Roellig, and A. J. Viescas, “Observation of Positronium Specular Reflection from LiF,” Phys. Rev Lett. 64, 542 (1988).
  • B.L. Brown, “Possible Galactic Positron Annihilation Medium: Neutral Atomic Hydrogen,” Astrophys. J. (Letters), 292, L67 (1985).

Dr. Paul H. CohenPaul H. Cohen
Edgar S. Woolard Distinguished Professor and Head
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (1982), Ohio State University

Research Interests

Micro/nano properties and processing, plastic deformation processes and tribology.

Cohen received his BS (1976) from the Department of Industrial Engineering at the University of Rhode Island and his MS (1979) and PhD (1982) from the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Ohio State University. Cohen’s work has focused on the modeling of plastic deformation processes, development of new tooling materials and tribology. His more recent research has examined properties and processes at the nano-scale. He has also worked at Battelle Memorial Institute and the Wanskuck Co. performing metalworking research, served in leadership roles in industry-based university research centers, published over 100 papers and served in editorial positions for leading journals. Cohen has won numerous awards from the Institute of Industrial Engineers, Society of Manufacturing Engineers and American Society for Engineering Education and National Science Foundation. He is the chair-elect of the Council of Fellows of the Institute of Industrial Engineers.

Selected Publications
  • J. Park, Q. Liu, C. Zhang, R. Liang, B. Wang, J. Pignatiello, J. Brooks, K. McBeardy, P. Cohen, R. Wysk, “Electro-Machining Using Metal Coated AFM Tip and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Buckeypaper Films,” Proceedings of 6th Multifunctional Nanocomposite International Conference, Honolulu, HI, September 20-22, 2006.
  • P.H. Cohen, M. Lovell, “Friction Between Deformable Surfaces in Machining,”  Proceedings of the Industrial Engineering Research Conference, 2007.
  • K.M. Fox, J.R. Hellmann, H. Izui, M.F. Amateau, W. Fu, P.H. Cohen, “Laminated WC-Co Composites for Tribological Applications,” pp. 179-190 in Ceramic Transactions, Vol. 154, Innovative Processing and Synthesis of Ceramics, Glasses and Composites VII. Edited by J.P. Singh and N. P. Bansal. American Ceramic Society, Westerville, OH, 2003.
  • S. Kamarthi, S. Kumara, P.H. Cohen, “Flank Wear Estimation Through Wavelet Representation of Acoustic Emission Signals,” Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, 122, (12) 2000.
  • R. Marwanga, R.C. Voigt, P.H. Cohen, “Influence of Graphite Morphology and Matrix Structure on Chip Formation During Machining of Gray Cast Iron,” AFS Transactions, Vol. 106, 2000.

Dr. Paul A. DaytonPaul A. Dayton
Associate Professor
UNC-NCSU Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering
PhD (2001), University of Virginia

Research Interests

Medical imaging, ultrasound imaging and therapeutics, contrast agents, molecular imaging, high-speed optical imaging, medical devices and engineering design.

Dayton graduated from Villanova University in 1995 with degrees in physics and comprehensive science and received his ME (1998) in electrical engineering and his PhD (2001) in biomedical engineering from the University of Virginia. His graduate research centered on studies of ultrasound contrast agents, and as a doctoral student Dayton developed two of the world’s first ultra-high speed optical microscopy imaging systems for physical analysis of contrast agents. Dayton conducted postdoctoral research and served as an assistant research professor and later as an associate at the University of California, Davis. At UC Davis, Dayton developed new methods for molecular imaging with ultrasound and contributed to techniques for ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery. He also developed the engineering design shop for the UC Davis Biomedical Engineering Department. His current research interests are focused on ultrasound contrast agents and molecular imaging with ultrasound. His other interests include general medical imaging, ultrasound enhanced therapeutics, high-speed optical imaging, medical devices and engineering design. Dayton’s research has recently been cited in magazines such as The Economist and Physics Today.

Selected Publications
  • E. Talu, K. Hettiarachchi, S. Zhao, R. Powell, A.P. Lee, M.L. Longo, P.A. Dayton. “Tailoring the size distribution of ultrasound contrast agents: A possible method for improving sensitivity in molecular imaging.” Mol Imaging. 2007 In Press.
  • P.A. Dayton, J.J. Rychak. “Molecular ultrasound imaging using microbubble contrast agents.” Front Biosci. 2007 Sep 1;12:5124-42. Review.
  • S. Zhao, D.E. Kruse, K.W. Ferrara, P.A. Dayton. “Selective imaging of adherent targeted ultrasound contrast agents.” Phys Med Biol. 2007 Apr 21;52(8):2055-72. Epub 2007 Mar 20.
  • P.A. Dayton, S. Zhao, S.H. Bloch, P. Schumann, K. Penrose, T.O. Matsunaga, R. Zutshi, A. Doinikov, K.W. Ferrara. “Application of ultrasound to selectively localize nanodroplets for targeted imaging and therapy.” Mol Imaging. 2006 Jul;5(3):160-74.
  • S. Zhao, M. Borden, S.H. Bloch, D. Kruse, K.W. Ferrara, P.A. Dayton. “Radiation-force assisted targeting facilitates ultrasonic molecular imaging.” Mol Imaging. 2004 Jul;3(3):135-48.

Dr. Brian (Trevor) DentonBrian (Trevor) Denton
Assistant Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (2001), McMaster University (Hamilton, ON, Canada)

Research Interests

Applied stochastic and combinatorial optimization, probabilistic models, simulation of large-scale systems, applications in the design and operation of health care delivery systems and medical decision-making.

Prior to joining NC State, Denton was a Senior Associate Consultant at the Mayo Clinic and an assistant professor in the Mayo College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn. Since joining the Mayo Clinic in 2005, his research interests have focused on the development of new models and methodology for optimization of health care delivery and medical treatment decisions. Prior to joining the Mayo Clinic he was a Senior Engineer at IBM from 2001-05. At IBM he was involved in research and development of production planning and scheduling systems for large-scale supply-chain optimization in high-tech manufacturing industries. Prior to joining IBM he worked on applications of mathematical programming in the steel manufacturing industry. His general research interests are in the application and development of solution methodology for large-scale optimization problems arising in industry applications. He has a joint BS in Physics and Chemistry, an MS in Physics and a PhD in Management Science from McMaster University.

Selected Publications
  • B.T. Denton, “Stochastic Optimization of Surgery Sequencing and Start Time Scheduling Decisions,” Health Care Management Science, 10(1), 2007.
  • B.T. Denton, J. Forrest, J. Milne, 2006, “A Mixed Integer Program for Semiconductor Supply Chain Optimization at IBM,” Interfaces, 36, 386-399.
  • B.T. Denton, and D. Gupta, 2004, “Strategic Inventory Deployment in the Steel Industry,” IIE Transactions, 36, 1083-1097.
  • B.T. Denton, and D. Gupta, 2003, “A Sequential Bounding Approach for Optimal Appointment Scheduling,” IIE Transactions, 35, 1003-1016.
  • B.T. Denton, D. Gupta, and K. Jawahir, 2003, “Managing Increasing Product Variety at Integrated Steel Mills,” Interfaces, 33, 41-53.

Dr. Jacob EapenJacob Eapen
Assistant Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
ScD (2006), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests

Science-based modeling and simulation of nuclear fuel for advanced reactors, nano-structured materials for nuclear engineering applications, plasma-material interactions with multiscale simulations, energy transport at nanoscales and interfaces, and modeling of diffusion and viscosity in glass matrices for radioactive waste management.

Eapen received his BT (1990) in Mechanical Engineering from University of Kerala (Kerala, India) and his MS (1998) in Nuclear Engineering from NC State. He earned his ScD (2006) in Nuclear Science and Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where his major contribution was to demonstrate the key mechanisms of thermal transport in nanofluids using molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

Professionally, he has worked as a scientific officer with Bhabha Atomic Research Center (Mumbai, India), where he researched flow-assisted refueling and flow instabilities in heavy water reactors and also worked as an analysis engineer at Framatome ANP, now known as Areva NP, in Virginia. Eapen joined the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2007 as a post-doctoral research associate. With Dr. Arthur Voter, he is developing accelerated molecular dynamics methods for the design of nuclear fuel for advanced reactors and glassy materials.

Selected Publications
  • Jacob Eapen, Wesley C. Williams, Jacopo Buongiorno, Lin-wen Hu, Sidney Yip, Roberto Rusconi and Roberto Piazza, “Mean-Field Versus Micro-Convection Effects in Nanofluid Thermal Conduction,” Physical Review Letters, 99 095901 (2007).
  • Jacob Eapen, Ju Li and Sidney Yip, “Mechanism of Thermal Transport in Dilute Nanocolloids,” Physical Review Letters 98 028302 (2007).
  • Jacob Eapen, Ju Li and Sidney Yip, “Statistical Field Estimators for Multiscale Simulations,” Physical Review E 72 056712 (2005).
  • Jacob Eapen, Ju Li and Sidney Yip, “Beyond the Maxwell Limit: Thermal Conduction In Nanofluids With Percolating Fluid Structures,” In Review, Physical Review E (2007).
  • Jacob Eapen, Blas P. Uberuaga and Arthur F. Voter, “Accessing Macroscopic Timescales with Accelerated Molecular Dynamics (AMD),” CESC-2007, Washington DC (April 2007).

Dr. Kirill EfimenkoKirill Efimenko
Research Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
PhD (1999), Institute of Chemical Technology (Prague, Czech Republic)

Research Interests

Stimuli responsive polymer materials, functionalized siloxane materials, self-assembly and directed assembly, and biofouling.

Efimenko received an MS (1996) in physics of polymer and dielectrics from Belarusian State University (Minsk, Belarus) and a PhD (1999) in Material Science and Technology from the Institute of Chemical Technology (Prague, Czech Republic). Shortly after that he joined the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NC State as a Postdoctoral Fellow. Efimenko was promoted to the position of a Senior Research Associate in 2002 as a joint appointment between the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and the Kenan Institute for Engineering, Technology and Science at NC State.

Selected Publications
  • J.F. Douglas, K. Efimenko, D.A. Fischer, F.R. Phelan, and J. Genzer, “Propagating waves of self-assembly in organosilane monolayers,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104 (25), 10324 (2007).
  • K. Efimenko, M. Rackaitis, E. Manias, A. Vaziri, L. Mahadevan, and J. Genzer, “Nested self-similar wrinkling patterns in skins,” Nature Materials 4, 293 (2005).
  • K. Efimenko, J.A. Crowe, E. Manias, D.W. Schwark, D.A. Fischer, and J. Genzer, “Rapid formation of soft hydrophilic silicone elastomer surfaces,” Polymer 46 (22): 9329 (2005).
  • K. Efimenko, W.E. Wallace, and J. Genzer, “Surface modification of Sylgard-184 poly(dimethyl siloxane) networks by ultraviolet and ultraviolet/ozone treatment,” Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 254 (2): 306 (2002).
  • J. Genzer and K. Efimenko, “Creating Long-Lived Superhydrophobic Polymer Surfaces Through Mechanically Assembled Monolayers,” Science 290, 2130 (2000).

Dr. Tiegang FangTiegang Fang
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2007), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research Interests

Combustion and propulsion, internal combustion engines, exhaust emissions and air pollution control, alternative fuels, renewable energy, spray and atomization, laser diagnostics for reacting flows, energy conversion systems, heat and mass transfer, and fluid mechanics.

Fang obtained his BE degree from the Automotive Engineering Department with a minor BE degree from the Computer Science and Technology Department at Tsinghua University (China). Fang obtained his MS degree from the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at Rutgers University-New Brunswick before entering the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for his PhD study.

Fang’s research experiences include diesel/CNG dual-fuel engines, high-speed infrared imaging and visualization in diesel engines, soot diagnostics using Laser Induced Incandescence technique and time-resolved Light Extinction technique, and liquid phase and vapor phase distribution during air-fuel mixing process by Laser Induced Exciplex Fluorescence technique. He is also interested in fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Fang is currently working on ultra-low emission combustion in internal combustion engines using advanced laser diagnostic techniques, renewable bio-diesel fuel combustion, and spray characterization of renewable alcohol-based bio-fuels. He has published more than 25 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers.

Selected Publications
  • T. Fang, R.E. Coverdill, C.F. Lee and R.A. White, “Smokeless Combustion Within a Small-bore HSDI Diesel Engine Using a Narrow Angle Injector,” SAE paper 2007-01-0203, (SP-2100), SAE Transaction: Journal of Engines, 2007.
  • T. Fang, R.E. Coverdill, C.F. Lee and R.A. White, “Combustion and soot visualization of low temperature combustion within an HSDI diesel engine using multiple injection strategy,” SAE paper 2006-01-0078, (SP-2012), 2006.
  • Tiegang Fang, “Unsteady solution of viscous fluid flow in an infinite cylinder with variable body force,” Physics of Fluids, Vol.16, No.1, 200-203, 2004.
  • Tiegang Fang, “A new approximation method to evaluate thermal contrast,” Infrared Physics and Technology, Vol. 44, No.3, 191-198, 2003.
  • Tiegang Fang, “An extension of Wien’s displacement law for blackbody radiation,” International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 29, No.6, 757-761, 2002.

Dr. Michael P. GamcsikMichael P. Gamcsik
Associate Professor
UNC-NCSU Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering
PhD (1983), University of Edinburgh (UK)

Research Interests

Metabolism, magnetic resonance, imaging, spectroscopy, tissue engineering, oncology, gerontology, oxidative stress and metabolic flux.

Gamcsik received his PhD (1983) in chemistry/biochemistry from the University of Edinburgh (UK) for research into low temperature studies of enzyme kinetics and transition-state stabilization using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. From there he went to the University of California at Santa Barbara for postdoctoral studies of protein structure and function. He continued his postdoctoral work in the Department of Radiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the areas of drug resistance and tumor metabolism. Gamcsik was later appointed to the faculty, first as an instructor and later as an assistant professor. His research included development of high-density cell culture methods for metabolic and imaging studies.

In 1997 Gamcsik joined the faculty in the Department of Medicine at Duke University and was appointed to a membership in the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center. At Duke, Gamcsik continued work in tissue engineering and the application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in the study of drug-resistant cancers, and he has recently used these same methods to probe antioxidant metabolism during neurodegeneration caused by aging.

Selected Publications
  • P.E. Thelwall, A.Y. Yemin, T.L. Gillian, N.E. Simpson, M.S. Kasibhatla, Z.N. Rabbani, J.M. Macdonald, S.J. Blackband, M.P. Gamcsik. “Noninvasive In vivo Detection of Glutathione Metabolism in Tumors,” Cancer Res. (2005) 65, 10149-10153.
  • M.P. Gamcsik, G.R. Dubay, B.R. Cox. “Increased Rate of Glutathione Synthesis from Cystine in Drug-Resistant MCF-7 Cells,” Biochem. Pharmacol.(2002) 63, 843-851.
  • I. Constantinidis, N.E. Mukundan, M.P. Gamcsik, A. Sambanis. “Towards the Development of a Bioartificial Pancreas:  A 13C NMR Study on the Effects of alginate/poly-L-lysine/alginate Entrapment on Glucose Metabolism by bTC3 Mouse Insulinoma Cells,” Cell. Mol. Biol. (1997) 43, 721-729.
  • M.P. Gamcsik, J.R. Forder, K.K. Millis, K.A. McGovern. “A Versatile Oxygenator and Perfusion System for Magnetic Resonance Studies,” Biotechnol. Bioeng. (1996) 49, 348-354.
  • M.P. Gamcsik, K.K. Millis, O.M. Colvin, “Noninvasive Detection of Elevated Glutathione Levels in MCF-7 Cells Resistant to 4-Hydroperoxycyclophosphamide,” Cancer Res. (1995) 55, 2012-2016.

Dr. Xiaohui (Helen) GuXiaohui (Helen) Gu
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2004), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research Interests

Distributed systems, operating systems, computer networks, autonomic computing and large-scale data analytics.

Gu received a BS (1999) in Computer Science from Peking University (China), and an MS (2001) and a PhD (2004) from the Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She was a research staff member at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center 2004-07.

Gu’s research interests include distributed systems, operating systems and computer networks. She has filed 8 patents and has published more than 25 research papers in international journals and major peer-reviewed conference proceedings. She received ILLIAC fellowship, David J. Kuck Best Master Thesis Award, and Saburo Muroga Fellowship from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  Gu serves on the program committees of many major international conferences and workshops, such as ACM Middleware, IEEE PerCom, IEEE RTSS, ACM MMM and ACM Multimedia.

Selected Publications
  • Xiaohui Gu, Philip S. Yu, Haixun Wang, “Adaptive Load Diffusion for Multiway Windowed Stream Joins,” IEEE International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE), Istanbul, Turkey, April, 2007.
  • Jin Liang, Xiaohui Gu, Klara Nahrstedt, “Self-Configuring Information Management for Large-Scale Service Overlays,” IEEE INFOCOM, Anchorage, Alaska, May, 2007.
  • Xiaohui Gu, Klara Nahrstedt, “On Composing Stream Applications in Peer-to-Peer Environments,” IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems (TPDS), 17 (8): 824-837, July, 2006.
  • Xiaohui Gu, Alan Messer, Ira Greenberg, Dejan Milojicic, Klara Nahrstedt, “Adaptive Offloading for Pervasive Computing,” IEEE Pervasive Computing Magazine, Vol. 3, No. 3, July 2004.
  • Xiaohui Gu, Klara Nahrstedt, Rong Chang, Christopher Ward, “QoS -Assured Service Composition in Managed Service Overlay Networks,” IEEE International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems  (ICDCS),Providence, RI, May 19-22, 2003.

Dr. Wesley HendersonWesley Henderson
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
PhD (2002), University of Minnesota

Research Interests

Ionic liquids, electrolytes for advanced energy technologies (batteries/supercapacitors) and biomass to biofuels conversion.

Henderson received his BS (1996) in Chemistry from the University of California at Santa Barbara and his PhD  (2002) in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Minnesota. He has worked as a summer fellow in the Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (1995) and a staff researcher in the MST-11 Division (Electronic and Electrochemical Materials and Devices), Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Henderson was an NSF International Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Ente per le Nuove Technologie, l’Energia e l’Ambiente (ENEA — Casaccia Research Center, the Italian National Laboratory for New Technologies, Energy, and the Environment), Advanced Energy Technologies Division in Rome, Italy 2002-04. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was an assistant research professor in the Department of Chemistry at the US Naval Academy 2004-07.

Selected Publications
  • W.A. Henderson, V.G. Young Jr., D.M. Fox, H.C. De Long, P.C. Trulove. “Alkyl vs. alkoxy chains on ionic liquid cations.” Chem. Commun. (2006) 3708-3710.
  • W.A. Henderson. “Glyme-lithium salt phase behavior.” J. Phys. Chem. B(2006) 110, 13177-13183.
  • W.A. Henderson, V.G. Young Jr., S. Passerini, P.C. Trulove, H.C. De Long. “Plastic phase transitions in N-ethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR12TFSI).” Chem. Mater. (2006) 18, 934-938.
  • W.A. Henderson, M. Herstedt, V.G. Young Jr., S. Passerini, H.C. De Long, P.C. Trulove. “A new disordering mode for TFSI anions — The nonequilibrium, plastic crystalline structure of Et4NTFSI.” Inorg. Chem. (2006) 45, 1412-1414.
  • J.H. Shin, W.A. Henderson, S. Passerini. “An elegant fix for polymer electrolytes.” Electrochem. Solid-State Lett. (2005) 8, A125-A127.

Dr. Julie Simmons IvyJulie Simmons Ivy
Assistant Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (1998), University of Michigan

Research Interests

Decision-making under conditions of uncertainty, optimization and stochastic models, particularly the application of Markov decision processes and partially observable MDPs to healthcare and manufacturing.

Ivy received her BS and PhD in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan and her MS in Operations Research from Georgia Institute of Technology. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, she spent several years on the faculty in Operations and Management Science at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.

Her research interests are mathematical modeling of stochastic dynamic systems with emphasis on statistics and decision analysis as applied to health care, manufacturing and service environments.  The focus of her research is decision-making under conditions of uncertainty with the objective of improving the decision quality. Her research program seeks to develop novel concepts of maintenance and monitoring policies and associated scientific theories, such as partially observable Markov decision processes, and apply them specifically to the important application domains of industrial and medical decision-making.

Selected Publications
  • J.S. Ivy, “Classification of Spot Welds Using Power Factor Time Profiles,” International Journal of Production Research, Vol. 39, No. 3, 549-566, 2001.
  • H.B. Nembhard and J.S. Ivy, “A Modeling Approach to Maintenance Decisions Using Statistical Quality Control and Optimization,” Quality and Reliability Engineering International, Vol. 21, No. 4, 355 – 366, 2005.
  • S. Pollock and J.S. Ivy, “Marginally Monotonic Maintenance Policies for a Multi-state Deteriorating Machine with Probabilistic Monitoring, and Silent Failures,” IEEE Transactions on Reliability, Vol. 54, No. 3, 489 – 497, 2005.
  • J. Zhou, D. Djurdjanovic, J. Ni, and J.S. Ivy, “Integrated reconfiguration and age-based preventive maintenance decision making,” IIE Transactions, forthcoming.
  • J.S. Ivy, “Balancing Patient and Payer Preferences: A Maintenance-based Model for Breast Cancer Treatment and Detection,” working paper.

Dr. Min LiuMin Liu
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2007), University of California, Berkeley

Research Interests

Performance and productivity improvement, lean construction (project-based production management for the architecture-engineering-construction industry), and international project management.

Min Liu received a BS (1994) in Structural Engineering from Tsingdao Institute of Architecture and Engineering (China), an MS (2001) in Construction Management from the National University of Singapore, and a PhD (2007) in Engineering and Project Management from the University of California, Berkeley. She worked in the China Construction Bank from 1997-99.

Selected Publications
  • W. Ibbs and M. Liu, (2005). “An improved measured mile analysis technique.” ASCE Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 131(12), 1249-1256.
  • M. Liu and Y.Y. Ling. (2005). “Modeling a contractor’s markup estimation.” ASCE Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 131(4), 391-399.
  • Y.Y. Ling and M. Liu. (2005). “Factors considered by successful and profitable contractors in mark-up size decision in Singapore,” Building and Environment, 40(11), 1557-1565.
  • W. Ibbs and M. Liu. (2005). “System dynamic modeling of delay and disruption claims.” AACE Cost Engineering, 47(6), 12-15.
  • Y.Y. Ling and M. Liu. (2004). “Using neural network to predict performance of design-build projects in Singapore.” Building and Environment, 39(10), 1263-1274.

Dr. Hong LuoHong Luo
Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (1989), Pierre and Marie Curie University (France)

Research Interests

Computational fluid dynamics, discontinuous Galerkin methods, unstructured grid generation methods and parallel computing.

After receiving his PhD (1989) from University of Paris 6 (Pierre and Marie Curie University), Luo spent two years at Purdue University as a postdoctoral research associate. He joined the Science Applications International Corporation in 1991 and worked there for 16 years as a Research Scientist first and later as a Senior Research Scientist. His research interests were in the areas of development and application of numerical methods for computational fluid dynamics and included studies on a wide variety of topics, including unstructured grid methods, cartesian grid methods, discontinuous Galerkin methods, adaptive grid methods, fluid-structure interaction, bubble dynamics, multi-material flows, blast and shock wave simulation and parallel computing.

Selected Publications
  • H. Luo, J.D. Baum, and R. Löhner, “A Hermite WENO-based limiter for discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured grids,” Journal of Computational Physics, Vol. 225, No. 1, pp. 686-713, 2007.
  • H. Luo, J.D. Baum, and R. Löhner, “On the Computation of Steady-State Compressible Flows Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method,” International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, DOI: 10.1002/nme.2081, 2007.
  • H. Luo, J.D. Baum, and R. Löhner, “A hybrid Cartesian grid and gridless method for compressible flows,” Journal of Computational Physics, Vol. 214, No. 2, pp.618-632, 2006.
  • H. Luo, J.D.  Baum, and R. Löhner, “A p-multigrid discontinuous Galerkin method for the Euler equations on unstructured grids,” Journal of Computational Physics, Vol. 211, No. 2, pp. 767-783, 2006.
  • H. Luo, J.D. Baum, and R. Löhner, “Extension of HLLC Scheme for Flows at All Speeds,” AIAA Journal, Vol. 43, No. 6, pp. 1160-1166, 2005.

Kemafor Anyanwu OganKemafor Anyanwu Ogan
Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2007), University of Georgia

Research Interests

Semantic Web and databases, intelligent querying, data management, knowledge creation and dissemination, and knowledge extraction from digital resources.

Anyanwu received a BS (1989) in Biochemistry from the University of Nigeria and worked for a few years in the biotech industry. She obtained a PhD (2007) in Computer Science from the University of Georgia and was a research assistant at the Large Scale Distributed Systems Lab (LSDIS lab) at the University of Georgia. Her dissertation work dealt with issues related to supporting complex searching and querying of semantic Web resources, and she has several publications in very selective conferences on this topic. Anyanwu also worked briefly in 2006 with the Advanced Database Group of HP Labs in Palo Alto, Calif., on the problem of Semantic Query Optimization (exploiting meaning and knowledge for optimizing the processing of queries).

Selected Publications
  • SPARQ2L: Towards Support for Subgraph Extraction Queries in RDF Databases (PDF) WWW 2007:797-806 (2007).
  • Kemafor Anyanwu, Angela Maduko, Amit P. Sheth: SemRank: ranking complex relationship search results on the semantic web. WWW 2005: 117-127 2003.
  • Kemafor Anyanwu, Amit P. Sheth: r-Queries: enabling querying for semantic associations on the semantic web. WWW 2003: 690-699.
  • Kemafor Anyanwu, Amit P. Sheth, Jorge Cardoso, John A. Miller, Krys Kochut: Healthcare Enterprise Process Development and Integration. Journal of Research and Practice in Information Technology 35(2): 83-98 (2003).
  • Kemafor Anyanwu, Amit P. Sheth: The r operator: Discovering and Ranking Associations on the Semantic Web. SIGMOD Record 31(4): 42-47 (2002).

Dr. Thomas A. RawdanowiczThomas A. Rawdanowicz
Research Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2005), North Carolina State University

Research Interests

Synthesis and characterization of electronic and opto-electronic materials, thin film growth using highly non-equilibrium processes, and electron beam-based analytical instrumentation and techniques.

Rawdanowicz received his BE (1980) in engineering from the University of South Florida, an MS (1997) in electrical engineering and an MS (1998) in mechanical engineering, both from North Carolina A&T University. He received his PhD (2005) from NC State and is a certified and practiced Professional Engineer. His experience includes a progressive 20-year career in electrical and mechanical engineering in the advanced design and development sector of aerospace and defense at Honeywell Inc. and E-Systems Inc., as well as the commercial and industrial sector at Gilbarco Inc. (Exxon). At NC State he manages the electron-optical and X-ray instrumentation and educates students and researchers on the use of X-ray diffractometry and transmission, scanning and spectrometry. Rawdanowicz utilizes his prior experience, as a seasoned Professional Engineer with certifications and qualifications in many aspects of building systems, to design or improve nano-science laboratories that meet the critical site requirements of atomic level analytical instrumentation operating in the sub-nanometer regime.

Selected Publications
  • T.A. Rawdanowicz and J. Narayan, “Epitaxial GaN on Si(111): Process Control of SiNx Interlayer Formation.” Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 133 (2004).
  • T.A. Rawdanowicz, H. Wang, A. Kvit and J. Narayan, “Studies on Epitaxial Relationship and Interface Structure of AlN/Si(111) and GaN/Si(111) Heterostructures.” Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 743, L3.24.1 (2003).
  • T.A. Rawdanowicz, S. Iyer, W.C. Mitchel, A. Saxler and S. Elhami, “Electronic Properties of Heteroepitaxial Undoped and n-InSb Epilayers using SnTe source by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.” J. Appl. Phys. 92, 296 (2002).
  • T.A. Rawdanowicz, J. Sankar, J. Narayan and V. Godbole, “Hardness and Elastic Modulus Measurements of AlN and TiN Sub-Micron Thin Films Using the Continuous Stiffness Measurement Technique with FEM Analysis.” Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 594, 507 (2000).
  • T.A. Rawdanowicz, V. Godbole, J. Narayan, J. Sankar and A. Sharma, “The Hardness and Elastic Moduli of Pulsed Laser Deposited Multilayer AlN/TiN Thin Films.” Composites Part B 30, 657 (1999).

Dr. Nagiza F. SamatovaNagiza F. Samatova
Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (1993) Computational Center of Russian Academy of Sciences (Moscow, Russia)

Research Interests

Graph theory and algorithms, high performance data analytics, computational biology and bioinformatics, scalable data analytics, data management and integration, graph theory and algorithms, natural language processing, and data and text mining.

Samatova is a joint faculty appointee between NC State and the Computer Science and Mathematics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where she is a Senior Research Scientist. She received a BS (1991) in applied mathematics from Tashkent State University (Uzbekistan), a PhD (1993) in mathematics from Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow and an MS (1998) in computer science from University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She has been a PI/co-PI on multi-institutional, multi-million dollar research programs funded through the DHS Biodefense Knowledge Center, DOE Genomes to Life, and DOE Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing initiatives. Her honors include 2007 YWCA Education Finalist, 2007 Battelle Significant Event Award, 2007 UT-Battelle Awards Nights Nomination for Exceptional Community Outreach, and 2006 UT-Battelle Incentivized Performance Award.  Samatova is the author of more than 70 refereed publications.

Selected Publications
  • D.W. Austin,  M.S. Allen, J.M. McCollum, R.D. Dar, J.R. Wilgus, G.S. Sayler, N.F. Samatova, C.D. Cox, and M.L. Simpson, “Gene network shaping of inherent noise spectra,” Nature, 2006 Feb 2;439(7076):608-11.
  • C. Pan, G. Kora, D.L. Tabb, D.A. Pelletier, W.H. McDonald, G.B. Hurst, R.L. Hettich, and N.F. Samatova, “Robust estimation of peptide abundance ratios and rigorous scoring of their variability and bias in quantitative shotgun proteomics,” Analytical Chemistry, 2006 Oct 15;78(20):7110-20.
  • G.X. Yu, B.H. Park, P. Chandramohan, R. Munavalli, A. Geist, and N.F. Samatova, “In-silico discovery of enzyme-substrate specificity-determining residue clusters,” Journal of Molecular Biology, 2005, 352(5):1105-17.
  • N.F. Samatova, M. Branstetter, A.R. Ganguly, R. Hettich, S. Khan, G. Kora, J. Li, X. Ma, C. Pan, A. Shoshani, and S. Yoginath, “High performance statistical computing with parallel R: applications to biology and climate modeling,” Journal of Physics, 2006, 46,  505-509.
  • N.F. Samatova, G. Ostrouchov, A. Geist, and A.V. Melechko, “RACHET: An efficient cover-based merging of clustering hierarchies from distributed datasets,” International Journal of Distributed and Parallel Databases, 2002, 11(2): p. 157-180.]

Dr. Steven ShannonSteven Shannon
Associate Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering
PhD (1999), University of Michigan

Research Interests

Plasma science, specifically plasma-assisted material processing for micro- and nano- scale device fabrication.

Shannon received his PhD (1999) from the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences at the University of Michigan. After graduating, Shannon joined the technical staff at Applied Materials Inc. in Sunnyvale, Calif., where he focused on the design, characterization and control of cutting edge plasma chambers for integrated circuit fabrication. While at Applied Materials, Shannon also held an adjunct faculty position in the Chemical and Materials Engineering Department at San Jose State University, where he taught subjects including plasma science, ion beam interactions with materials and integrated circuit fabrication.

Shannon is a member of the American Physical Society, American Vacuum Society, and IEEE and serves on the IEEE Plasma Science Applications Executive Committee. He holds four patents in plasma-assisted manufacturing and high power RF technology and has eight additional patents pending.

Selected Publications
  • M. Carter, P. Ryan, D. Hoffman, and S. Shannon, “Interaction of radial magnetic fields with VHF capacitive discharges,” IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci.35(5).
  • K. Bera, D. Hoffman, S. Shannon, G. Delgadino, Y. Ye, “Frequency Optimization for Capacitively Coupled Plasma Source;” IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 33(2).
  • S. Shannon, D. Hoffman, J.G. Yang, A. Paterson, and J. Holland, “Study of a radio frequency sheath driven by two frequencies—IEDF dependence and VDC dependence,” J. Appl. Phys. 97(10).
  • James Paul Holloway, Steven Shannon, Scott M. Sepke, Mary L. Brake, “A Reconstruction Algorithm for a Spatially Resolved Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy Sensor;” J. Quant. Spect. and Rad. Trans., 68(1).
  • Steven Shannon, James Paul Holloway, Mary L. Brake, “Spatially Resolved Fluorine Actinometry;” J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 17(5).

Dr. Joseph Benjamin TracyJoseph Benjamin Tracy
Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2005), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests

Chemistry and physics of magnetic nanoparticles and applications in composite magnetic materials, spintronics, biology and medicine.

Tracy joined NC State faculty after two years of post-doctoral research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he developed methods for characterizing small gold nanoparticles using mass spectrometry.  At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology he earned his PhD (2005) in Physical Chemistry and conducted research on the synthesis, characterization and applications of magnetic nanoparticles.  He was first introduced to nanoscale materials through undergraduate research on semiconductor quantum dots at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he received his BS in Chemistry and where he also completed minors in mathematics and German. He has had two study-abroad experiences in Germany, where he performed research on carbon nanotubes (Karlsruhe) and was an exchange student (Göttingen).

Selected Publications
  • J.B. Tracy, G. Kalyuzhny, M.C. Crowe, R. Balasubramanian, J.P. Choi, R.W. Murray, “Poly(ethylene glycol) Ligands for High-Resolution Nanoparticle Mass Spectrometry,” Journal of the American Chemical Society 2007, 129, 6706.
  • J.B. Tracy, M.G. Bawendi, “Defects in CoO in Oxidized Cobalt Nanoparticles Dominate Exchange Biasing and Exhibit Anomalous Magnetic Properties,” Physical Review B 2006, 74, 184434.
  • J.B. Tracy, D.N. Weiss, D.P. Dinega, M.G. Bawendi, “Exchange Biasing and Magnetic Properties of Partially and Fully Oxidized Colloidal Cobalt Nanoparticles,” Physical Review B 2005, 72, 064404.
  • S.W. Kim, J.P. Zimmer, S. Ohnishi, J.B. Tracy, J.V. Frangioni, M.G. Bawendi, “Engineering InAsxP1-x/InP/ZnSe III-V Alloyed Core/Shell Quantum Dots for the Near-Infrared,” Journal of the American Chemical Society 2005, 127, 10526.
  • S.W. Kim, S. Kim, J.B. Tracy, A. Jasanoff, M.G. Bawendi, “Phosphine Oxide Polymer for Water-Soluble Nanoparticles,” Journal of the American Chemical Society 2005, 127, 4556.

Dr. James Murray TuckJames Murray Tuck III
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
PhD (2007), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research Interests

Computer architecture and compilers, including chip-multiprocessor architectures, thread-level speculation hardware and automatic speculative parallelization, code optimization using efficient runtime disambiguation, and system-level support for speculation.

Tuck received his BE (1999) from Vanderbilt University and his MS (2003) and PhD (2007) from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His overall research focus is in computer architecture and compiler design, with the main focus on chip multiprocessors (CMPs) and hardware and compiler support for aggressive speculative execution. While working on his PhD, Tuck published more than 10 articles in computer architecture, and he received an IEEE Micro Top Picks Paper Award in 2006 for his work in Thread-Level Speculation. Tuck is a member of Tau Beta Phi, the IEEE Computer Society, and the ACM.

Selected Publications
  • James Tuck, Luis Ceze, Josep Torrellas. “Scalable Cache Miss Handling for High Memory Level Parallelism,” International Symposium on Microarchitecture (MICRO), December 2006.
  • James Tuck, Wei Liu, Josep Torrellas, “CAP: Criticality Analysis for Power-Efficient Speculative Multithreading,” International Conference on Computer Design (ICCD), October 2007.
  • Luis Ceze, James Tuck, Calin Cascaval, and Josep Torrellas. “Bulk Disambiguation of Speculative Threads in Multiprocessors,” International Symposium on Computer Architecture (ISCA), June 2006.
  • Wei Liu, James Tuck, Luis Ceze, Wonsun Ahn, Karin Strauss, Jose Renau and Josep Torrellas. “POSH: A TLS Compiler that Exploits Program Structure,” Principles and Practice of Parallel Programming (PPoPP), March 2006.
  • Luis Ceze, James Tuck, Pablo Montesinos, and Josep Torrellas. “Bulk Enforcement of Sequential Consistency,” International Symposium on Computer Architecture (ISCA), June 2007.

Dr. Reha UzsoyReha Uzsoy
Clifton A. Anderson Distinguished Professor
Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
PhD (1990), University of Florida

Research Interests

Production planning and control, supply chain management, semiconductor manufacturing, and health care delivery.

Reha Uzsoy holds a BS degree in Industrial Engineering and Mathematics and an MS in Industrial Engineering from Bogazici University (Istanbul, Turkey). He received his PhD (1990) in Industrial and Systems Engineering from the University of Florida. He is the author of one book, an edited book and more than 70 refereed journal publications.

Before coming to the US, Uzsoy worked as a production engineer with Arcelik AS, a major appliance manufacturer in Istanbul, Turkey, and worked as a visiting researcher at Intel Corporation and IC Delco. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, Intel Corporation, Hitachi Semiconductor, Harris Corporation, Kimberly Clark, Union Pacific and General Motors. He was named a Fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers in 2005, Outstanding Young Industrial Engineer in Education in 1997 and a University Faculty Fellow by Purdue University in 2001.  Uzsoy has received awards for both undergraduate and graduate teaching and is currently serving on the Editorial Boards of IIE Transactions on Scheduling and Logistics and the International Journal of Computer-Integrated Manufacturing.

Selected Publications
  • I.M. Ovacik and R. Uzsoy, “Decomposition Methods for Complex Factory Scheduling Problems,” Kluwer Academic Publishing (1997).
  • A. Upasani, R. Uzsoy, and K. Sourirajan, “A Problem Reduction Approach for Scheduling Semiconductor Wafer Fabrication Facilities,” IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing 19, 216-225 (2006).
  • J. Asmundsson, R.L. Rardin, and R. Uzsoy, “Tractable Nonlinear Production Planning Models for Semiconductor Wafer Fabrication Facilities,” IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing 19, 95-111 (2006).
  • K. Sourirajan, L. Ozsen, and R. Uzsoy, “A Single Product Network Design Model with Lead Time and Safety Stock Considerations,” IIE Transactions on Scheduling and Logistics 39, 411-424 (2007).
  • J.M. Asmundsson, S. Orcun, and J. Pekny, R.L. Rardin, and R. Uzsoy, “Supply Chain Optimization and Protocol Environment (SCOPE) for Rapid Prototyping and Analysis of Supply Chains,” Production Planning and Control, forthcoming.

Dr. Yaroslava G. YinglingYaroslava G. Yingling
Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (2002), The Pennsylvania State University

Research Interests

Multiscale molecular modeling as applied to design, fabrication, and properties of biological nanoparticles and nanomaterials, structure-function relationship and tertiary structure prediction of RNA, laser micromachining, degradation and characterization of polymeric, composite, and biological materials.

Yingling studied computer science and engineering at St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University (Russia), where she received her University Diploma (1996). She obtained her PhD (2002) in Materials Engineering and High Performance Computing Applications from The Pennsylvania State University and received the Best PhD Thesis Award from PSU Materials Research Institute for her work on laser interactions with organic materials. She continued postdoctoral research in the Department of Chemistry at Penn State working on modeling polymer degradation and laser ablation.

In 2004 Yingling joined National Institutes of Health as Cancer Research Training Award Postdoctoral Fellow where she investigated structure and genetic mutations of telomerase RNA, RNA tertiary structure prediction, and design and formation of functionalized RNA nanoparticles. She has 22 publications and holds 1 patent.

Selected Publications
  • Y.G. Yingling, B.A. Shapiro, Computational design of an RNA hexagonal nano-ring and an RNA nanotube, Nano Lett. 7 (2007) 2328-2334.
  • B.A. Shapiro, Y.G. Yingling, W. Kasprzak, E. Bindewald, Bridging the gap in RNA structure prediction, Current Opinion in Structural Biology 17 (2007) 157-165.
  • Y.G. Yingling, B.A. Shapiro, The Prediction of the Wild-type Telomerase RNA Pseudoknot Structure and the Pivotal Role of a Bulge in its Formation, J Mol Graph Model 25 (2006) 261-274.
  • Y.G. Yingling, B.J. Garrison, Coarse-Grained Model of Interaction of Light with Polymeric material – Onset of Ablation, Journal of Physical Chemistry B,109 (2005) 1648216489.
  • L.V. Zhigilei, E. Leveugle, B.J. Garrison, Y.G. Yingling, M.I. Zeifman, Computer Simulation of Laser Ablation of Molecular Substrates, Chemical Reviews 103 (2003) 321.

Dr. Jie YuJie Yu
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
PhD (2000), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests

Environmental fluid mechanics, surf zone currents and wave-current interaction, generation mechanisms for rip currents, sediment transport and coastal morphodynamics, integrated coastal modeling and data assimilations for environmental systems, water wave mechanics, mass transport in wave boundary layer and seabed mechanics, Bragg scattering/resonance of water waves, hydrodynamics instabilities and homogenization/multi-scale modeling.

Yu was a faculty member in the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering the University of Manchester (UK). She received her PhD (2000) in civil and environmental engineering at MIT, working with Professor Chiang C. Mei on water wave mechanics and seabed mechanics. Since then Yu has been working on surf zone currents and wave-current interaction, in particular the generation mechanisms for rip currents. She received an MS in applied and computational mathematics at Florida State University, and a BS in mechanical engineering at University of Science and Technology of China (USTC).

Selected Publications
  • L.N. Howard and J. Yu, 2007, “Normal modes of a  tank with corrugated bottom.” J. Fluid Mech., in press.
  • J. Yu, 2006, “On the instability leading to rip currents due to  wave-current interaction.” J. Fluid Mech., 549, 403-428.
  • J. Yu and D.N. Slinn, 2003, “Effects of wave-current interaction on rip currents.” J. Geophy. Res., 108(C3), 3088, doi:10.1029/2001JC001105.
  • J. Yu and C.C. Mei, 2000, “Formation of sand bars under surface waves.” J. Fluid Mech., 416, 315-348.
  • C.C. Mei and J. Yu, 1997, “The instability of sand ripples under partially standing surface waves.” Physics of Fluids, 9(6), 1606-1620.

Dr. Yong ZhuYong Zhu
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
PhD (2005), Northwestern University

Research Interests

MEMS/NEMS design, fabrication and characterization, mechanics and materials issues in nanostructures and thin films, and mechanics of soft materials (including polymers and biological cells) and soft/hard materials interface.

Zhu received his BS (1999) in Solid Mechanics from the University of Science and Technology of China and his MS (2001) and PhD (2005) both in Mechanical Engineering from Northwestern University. After graduation he was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Center for Mechanics of Solids, Structures, and Materials at the University of Texas at Austin.

Zhu’s research interests lie in the study of mechanical behavior of advanced materials, in particular developing micro/nano electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) to probe nanostructures and biological cells.

Selected Publications
  • Y. Zhu, A. Corgliano, H.D. Espinosa, “Thermal actuator for nanoscale tensile tests: design and characterization,” Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, vol. 16, pp. 242-253, 2006.
  • Y. Zhu, H.D. Espinosa, “An electro-mechanical material testing system for in-situ electron microscopy and applications,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, vol. 102, pp. 14503-14508, 2005.
  • Y. Zhu, N. Moldovan, H.D. Espinosa, “A microelectromechanical load sensor used for in-situ electron and x-ray microscopy tensile testing of nanostructures,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 86, pp. 013506, 2005.
  • Y. Zhu, H.D. Espinosa, “Effect of temperature on capacitive RF MEMS switch performance — a coupled-field analysis,” Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, vol. 14, pp. 1270-1279, 2004.
  • H.D. Espinosa, Y. Zhu, M. Fischer, J.W. Hutchinson, “An experimental/computational appcsroach to identify moduli and residual stress in MEMS radio-frequency switches,” Experimental Mechanics, vol. 43, pp. 309-316, 2003.

Dr. Yuntian T. ZhuYuntian T. Zhu
Associate Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
PhD (1994), University of Texas at Austin

Research Interests

Synthesis of long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and CNT arrays, CNT fibers, CNT composites, nano energy materials, solar cells, deformation physics of nano metals and alloys, and the design and development of nano metals and alloys with high strength and high ductility.

Zhu was the team leader of the Nanomaterials Team in MPA-STC, Los Alamos National Laboratory, before he joined the NC State faculty in 2007. Zhu’s research in recent years has focused on metals and alloys with nano/ultrafine-grain structures and synthesis and applications of carbon nanotubes. His group experimentally verified partial dislocation emission from a grain boundary and three twinning mechanisms in nanocrystalline aluminum and copper. He and his colleagues also experimentally observed, for the first time, five-fold deformation twins and discovered a new twinning mechanism in nanocrystalline fcc metals that does not generate macroscopic strain.

In addition, his group recently developed three strategies to simultaneously increase the strength and ductility of nanostrutured/ultrafine-grained metals and alloys. They have also recently synthesized 4-cm long carbon nanotubes and fabricated super strong and stiff carbon nanotube fibers with specific strength many times higher than current engineering fibers. These achievements have won his team two Nano50 Awards and one Micro/Nano25 Award.

Selected Publications
  • L.X. Zheng, M.J. O’Connel, X.Z. Liao, Y.H. Zhao, E.A. Akhadov, S.K. Doorn, B.J. Roop, Q.X. Jia, M.A. Hoffbauer, R.C. Dye, D.E. Peterson, Y.M. Huang, J. Liu, Y.T. Zhu, “Ultralong Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes,” Nature Materials 3, 673-676 (2004).
  • Y.H. Zhao, J.F. Bingert, X.Z. Liao, B.Z. Cui, K. Han, A.V. Sergueeva, A.K. Mukherjee, R.Z. Valiev, T.G. Langdon, and Y.T. Zhu, “Simultaneously Elevating the Ductility and Strength of Ultrafine-Grained Pure Cu,” Advanced Materials 18, 2949-2953 (2006).
  • Q.W. Li, X.F. Zhang, R.F. Depaula, L.X. Zheng, Y.H. Zhao, L. Stan, T.G. Holesinger, P.N. Arendt, D.E. Peterson, Y.T. Zhu, “Sustained Growth of Ultralong Carbon Nanotube Arrays for Fiber Spinning,” Advanced Materials18, 3160-3163 (2006).
  • X.F. Zhang, Q.W. Li, Y. Tu, Y. Li, Y.H. Zhao, L.X. Zheng, Q.X. Jia, D.E. Peterson and Y.T. Zhu, “Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fiber with Excellent Mechanical Properties,” Small, 3, 244-248 (2007).
  • X.L. Wu, Y. Qi, and Y.T. Zhu, “Partial-Mediated Slips in Nanocrystalline Ni at High Strain Rate,” Applied Physics Letters 90, 221911 (2007).