Faculty Highlights

Three receive NSF CAREER Awards

Dr. Milad Abolhasani
Dr. Abolhasani

Three faculty members in the College have been chosen to receive Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) awards from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Dr. Chris Martens
Dr. Martens

The NSF CAREER award is one of the most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty members who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.

NSF will provide $558,779 in funding over five years to Dr. Milad Abolhasani, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (CBE), for the project, “Intelligent Synthesis of Colloidal Nanocrystals Enabled by Microreaction Engineering in Flow.”

Dr. Qinshan Wei
Dr. Wei

NSF will provide $500,000 in funding over five years to Dr. Chris Martens, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science, for the project, “Explorable Formal Models of Privacy Policies and Regulations.”

NSF will provide $500,000 in funding over five years to support Dr. Qingshan Wei, assistant professor in CBE, for the project, “Smartphone-Based CRISPR Biosensor for Point-of-Care HIV Viral Load Testing.”

Genzer receives R.J. Reynolds Award

Dr. Jan Genzer
Dr. Genzer

Dr. Jan Genzer, S. Frank and Doris Culberson Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, is the thirty-fifth recipient of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Award for Excellence in Teaching, Research and Extension.

The annual award was established in 1981 to honor a College of Engineering faculty member who has demonstrated superiority in several areas of activity that relate to NC State’s three-fold mission of teaching, research and extension. The recipient is given a $25,000 prize distributed over five years.

Internationally recognized for his research in the area of soft materials, Genzer is a leading scholar in the area of polymer physics and interfacial phenomena, a prolific publisher of scholarly papers, a dedicated and innovative teacher and an enthusiastic organizer of scientific events in the Research Triangle area.

Among his many honors, he is a recipient of the National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award, the John H. Dillon Medal of the American Physical Society, the NSF Special Creativity Award, the NC State Outstanding Teacher Award, the NC State Alumni Outstanding Research Award, the Alcoa Foundation Distinguished Engineering Research Award and a Fellowship of the American Physical Society.

Hall named AAAS Fellow

Dr. Carol Hall
Dr. Hall

Dr. Carol Hall, Camille Dreyfus Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, has been elected as a Fellow of the American Association for Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest scientific society and publisher of journal science.

AAAS Fellows are elected by their peers who serve on the Council of AAAS, the organization’s member-run governing body, for having shown “scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.”

Hall was elected for her distinguished contributions to the field of thermodynamics using statistical methods and computer simulation methods to solve engineering problems involving macromolecules and complex fluids.

She joined the NC State faculty in 1985 and was one of the first women to be appointed to a chemical engineering faculty in the United States. Hall is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of AIChE and the American Physical Society.

With her appointment, the College has nine active faculty members who are AAAS Fellows.

Bottomley named Tech Educator of the Year

Dr. Laura Bottomley
Dr. Bottomley

Dr. Laura Bottomley, director of The Engineering Place and the Women in Engineering program within the College, was named Tech Educator of the Year during the NC TECH Association’s annual NC TECH Awards program in November.

The award honors “an individual (e.g. teacher, administrator, counselor, etc.) that has demonstrated innovation and effectiveness in the use of technology to educate students, and / or has been effective in driving interest among students in pursuing technology fields.”

Bottomley founded the K-12 outreach program The Engineering Place in 1999, and is responsible for its oversight and strategic operations. She is also a frequent creative contributor to program content and holds primary responsibility for funding, operation and personnel. Along with directing the Women in Engineering program, she advises students and teaches the E 101 Introduction to Engineering and Problem-Solving class for first-year students in the College.

In 2000, she was among the College’s representatives as it received a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM). In 2009, she received an individual PAESMEM for her mentoring and outreach efforts with the Women in Engineering and K-12 Outreach Programs. She is a Fellow of IEEE and the American Society for Engineering Education.


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