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New Faculty — Year 2011-12

The College takes pride in bringing exceptional new faculty to NC State. Since 2000, more than 90 of our faculty members have earned prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER awards, among the top honors given by the federal agency to early-career faculty in science and engineering.

Annual Lists

Lists of new faculty members for previous years going back to 2011 are available. Use the sidebar links to navigate to the desired year.

Information on each faculty member is relevant to the year the faculty member joined the College of Engineering. Check the departments’ websites for more current information.

UNC/NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering

Dr. Albena Ivanisevic

Associate Professor
PhD (2000), University of Wisconsin-Madison

Research Interests: Massively parallel manufacturing of nanoscale structures with magnetic and metallic properties; high-resolution and -throughput surface characterization and lithographic tools for tissue engineering applications; and fabrication and characterization of semiconductor surfaces composed of biomolecular structures.

Ivanisevic received a BS in chemistry from Drake University and was inspired to pursue a PhD after doing undergraduate research in organic synthesis. She has received the MIT Technology Review’s TR100 Award: Top 100 Young Innovators (2004), the NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship (2004), and the National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship (Northwestern University, 2000-2002).

Ivanisevic’s research is centered on using surface techniques to immobilize biomolecules on inorganic and tissue surfaces. The work utilizes a broad perspective on problems in chemistry, materials and biomedical engineering and is aimed to address the need to understand how to manipulate and tailor the properties of surfaces for the fabrication of better sensor and tissue platforms. All projects involve the fabrication of new platforms for placement and evaluation of materials and permit one to do basic research that enables the tuning of materials properties. Many aspects of her projects are also interfaced with finding solutions for biomedical problems.

  • H. Jaganathan and A. Ivanisevic, “In vitro cytotoxic evaluation of metallic and magnetic dna-templated nanostructures,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, vol. 2, pp. 1407-1413, May 2010.
  • M. A. Kramer, H. Jaganathan, and A. Ivanisevic, “Serial and parallel dip-pen nano lithography using a colloidal probe tip,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 132, pp. 4532, Apr 7 2010.
  • M. S. Makowski, D. Y. Zemlyanov, and A. Ivanisevic, “Olefin metathesis reaction on GaN (0001) surfaces,” Applied Surface Science, vol. 257, pp. 4625-4632, Mar 1 2011.
  • D. N. Richards, D. Y. Zemlyanov, R. M. Asrar, Y. Y. Chokshi, E. M. Cook, T. J. Hinton, X. R. Lu, V. Q. Nguyen, N. K. Patel, J. R. Usher, S. Vaidyanathan, D. A. Yeung, and A. Ivanisevic, “DNA immobilization on GaP(100) investigated by kelvin probe force microscopy,” Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 114, pp. 15486-15490, Sep 16 2010.

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Dr. Chase Beisel

Assistant Professor
PhD (2009), California Institute of Technology

Research Interests: Synthetic biology, systems biology, RNA engineering and microbial metabolic engineering.

Beisel received his BS in chemical engineering from Iowa State University with minors in mathematics and biochemistry. He then received his PhD in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology with a biology minor. Beisel was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health before starting his faculty position at NC State.

Beisel studies the underlying genetic architecture of decision-making in bacteria and how this architecture can be altered to control cellular behavior. He specifically focuses on the roles that regulatory RNAs play in these processes. Beisel is interested in elucidating design principles underlying genetic networks of regulatory RNAs and engineering these networks to address emerging challenges in health and sustainability.

  • Beisel, C.L. and Storz, G. The base pairing RNA Spot 42 participates in a multi-output feedforward loop to help enact catabolite repression in Escherichia coli. Mol Cell 2011 41:1-12.
  • Beisel, C.L. and Storz, G. Base pairing small RNAs and their roles in global regulatory networks. FEMS Microbiol Rev 2010 34(5):866-82.
  • Beisel, C.L., Chen, Y.Y., Culler, S.J., Hoff, K.G., Smolke, C.D. Design of small molecule-responsive microRNAs based on structural requirements for Drosha processing. Nucleic Acids Res 2010 doi: 10.1093/nar/gkq954.
  • Beisel, C.L. and Smolke, C.D. Design principles for riboswitch function. PLoS Comput Biol 2009 5(4):e1000363.
  • Beisel, C.L., Bayer, T.S., Hoff, K.G., Smolke, C.D. Model-guided design of ligand-regulated RNAi for programmable control of gene expression. Mol Syst Biol 2008 4:224.
Dr. Michael C. Flickinger

Professor
PhD (1977), University of Wisconsin-Madison

Research Interests: Industrial biocatalysis, biocatalytic coatings, advanced biocatalytic or photoreactive soft materials, biochemical reactor design and microbial biocatalysis of single carbon compounds.

Flickinger earned his BS in biochemistry and his MS and PhD degrees in pharmaceutical biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was a postdoctoral researcher at the Laboratory for Renewable Resources Engineering in the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. He then became fermentation program director at the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Frederick Cancer Research Center.

While at NCI, Flickinger supervised anti-tumor drug discovery and development, which included process development and scale-up for cGMP (current Good Manufacturing Practice) manufacture of anti-cancer antibiotics, therapeutic enzymes, experimental biologics and large scale tumor viruses for fundamental studies and pre-clinical and human clinical trials. In 1985, he was named founding director of the University of Minnesota’s Institute for Advanced Studies in Biological Process Technology. In addition to teaching at Minnesota, he trained more than 30 graduate students and was co-editor of the Encyclopedia of Bioprocess Technology: Fermentation, Biocatalysis and Bioseparation.

In 2007, Flickinger came to NC State as the associate director for academic programs at the Golden LEAF Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center (BTEC). This past spring he transferred his tenured faculty appointment from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences to the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (CBE) in the College of Engineering. In addition to supervising CBE graduate students, he teaches both CHE and BTEC undergraduate and graduate courses, is director of the new Master of Biomanufacturing Graduate Program and is editor-in-chief of the international Encyclopedia of Industrial Biotechnology. Flickinger was elected a Fellow of the American Chemical Society in 2009, becoming the first faculty member at NC State so named.

  • Fidaleo, M. & Flickinger, M.C., 2011, “Engineering and Modeling of Thin Adhesive Microbial Biocatalytic Coatings for High Intensity Oxidations in Multi-Phase Microchannel Bioreactors” Chem. Eng. Sci. 66: 3251-3257.
  • Gosse, J.L., B.J. Engel, J C-H Hui, C.S. Harwood & M.C. Flickinger, 2010, “Progress Toward a Biomimetic “Leaf”: Coating-Stabilized Nongrowing Photosynthetic Rhodopseudomonas palustris Produces Hydrogen Gas Continuously for Over 4,000 Hours” Biotechnol. Prog. 26: 907-918.
Dr. Fanxing Li

Assistant Professor
PhD (2009), Ohio State University

Research Interests: Nano catalysts and reagent particles for biomass and fossil energy conversions, green liquid fuel synthesis, CO2 capture and pollutant control.

Li received his BS and MS degrees in chemical engineering from Tsinghua University in China in 2001 and 2004, respectively. He joined Dr. Liang-Shih Fan’s research group at the Ohio State University in 2004 and received his PhD in 2009. Since then, he continued to work with Fan as a research scientist. Working with Fan, Li has prepared eight funded proposals and obtained $15 million in research grants. Li is also inventor or co-inventor on seven patents and has published 18 journal articles and book chapters. He has won numerous international awards, including the prestigious Best PhD in Particle Technology Award that he received in 2010.

Energy and global warming are two intertwined issues of critical importance in the modern era. The Li Research Group focuses on the design, synthesis and characterization of nano catalysts and reagent particles for biomass and fossil energy conversions, green liquid fuel synthesis, CO2 capture and pollutant control. Li’s group also encompasses chemical reaction engineering and process synthesis and optimization. Density Functional Theory-based methods are also used to elucidate the particle reaction mechanisms and identify potential ways to improve particle performance.

  • Fanxing Li, Siwei Luo, Zhenchao Sun, Xiaoguang Bao, and L.-S. Fan. “Role of Metal Oxide Support in Redox Reactions of Iron Oxide for Chemical Looping Applications: Experiments and Density Functional Theory Calculations.” Energy and Environmental Science. 2011 (In Press, DOI: 10.1039/C1EE01325D).
  • Fanxing Li, Zhenchao Sun, Siwei Luo, and L.-S. Fan. “Ionic Diffusion in Iron Oxidation – Effect of Support and Its Implications to Chemical Looping Applications.” Energy and Environmental Science. 2011, 4, 876-880.
  • Fanxing Li, Liang Zeng, and L.-S. Fan. “Biomass Direct Chemical Looping Process: Process Simulations.” Fuel. 2010, 89(12): 3773 – 3784.
  • Fanxing Li, L.-S. Fan. “Clean Coal Conversion Processes – Progress and Challenges.”
    Energy and Environmental Science. 2008, 1:248-267.
  • Fanxing Li, Yao Wang, Dezheng Wang, and Fei Wei. “Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by N2 adsorption.” Carbon, 2004, 42: 2375-2383.

Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

Dr. Andrew Grieshop

Assistant Professor
PhD (2008), Carnegie Mellon University

Research Interests: Sources and evolution of atmospheric aerosols, characterization of in-use emissions from mobile and stationary combustion sources, linkages between air pollution emissions and climate change, air pollution exposure assessment, technical policy analysis of the environmental impacts of energy systems, and energy and environment in developing countries.

Grieshop received his BS in mechanical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley and his MS in mechanical engineering and PhD in mechanical engineering and engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University, where he was a member of the multidisciplinary Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies. He was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability and the Liu Institute for Global Issues at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia.

His research focuses on interactions between energy use and the environment and more specifically on improving our technical understanding of the emission and atmospheric transformations of air pollutants. This work aims to inform effective policies to improve air quality and mitigate climate impacts in both developed and developing countries. Current research includes a collaborative project to quantify the emission, indoor concentration, and health and climate impacts of a cookstove replacement program in rural India and a project to characterize the particulate matter emitted by heavy-duty natural gas engines. His work integrates laboratory-and field-based experimentation with modeling and policy analysis efforts to address environmental problems. Grieshop will join the NC State faculty in January 2012.

  • Grieshop, A. P., Lipsky, E. M., Pekney, N. J., Takahama, S., and Robinson, A. L. (2006). “Fine particle emission factors from vehicles in a highway tunnel: Effects of fleet composition and season.” Atmospheric Environment, 40, S287-S298.
  • Grieshop, A. P., Logue, J. M., Donahue, N. M., and Robinson, A. L. (2009). “Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires 1: measurement and simulation of organic aerosol evolution.” Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(4), 1263-1277.
  • Grieshop, A. P., Miracolo, M. A., Donahue, N. M., and Robinson, A. L. (2009). “Constraining the Volatility Distribution and Gas-Particle Partitioning of Combustion Aerosols Using Isothermal Dilution and Thermodenuder Measurements.” Environmental Science & Technology, 43(13), 4750-4756.
Dr. Edward J. Jaselskis

Jimmy D. Clark Distinguished Professor
PhD (1988), University of Texas at Austin

Research Interests: Modeling and predicting construction project success, application of tele-presence techniques to create a virtual engineering and management environment for capital facility projects, and real time remote monitoring of construction site operations.

Jaselskis received his BS in general engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his MS in civil engineering with an emphasis in construction engineering and management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a PhD in civil engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. He has served as a program director for the National Science Foundation in the area of information technology and infrastructure systems.

Presently he studies how tele-engineering and management concepts can be applied to improve the efficiency of construction site operations. He is currently developing a Tele-Engineering and Management (TEAM) laboratory where he will investigate how virtual interaction among team participants (e.g., designers, sureties, owners, contractors, material suppliers and subcontractors) can improve quality, reduce cost and ensure timely project delivery.

  • Jaselskis, Edward J., Ruwanpura, J., Becker, T., Silva, L., Jewell, P., and Floyd, E., “Innovation in Construction Engineering Education Using Two Applications of Internet-based Information Technology to Provide Real-Time Project Observations,” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management,American Society of Civil Engineers, Special Issue, October 2011.
  • Cable, James K., Edward J. Jaselskis, Russell Walters, and Chris Bauer (2009), “Stringless Portland Cement Concrete Paving,” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Vol. 135, Issue 11, pp. 1253-1260.
  • Walters, Russell, Edward J. Jaselskis, Jianzhong Zhang, and Kim Mueller, “Using Scanning Lasers to Determine the Thickness of Concrete Pavement,” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, American Society of Civil Engineers, August 2008, Vol. 13, No. 6, pp. 583-591.
  • Jaselskis, Edward J., J. Grigas, and A. Brilingas, “Dielectric Properties of Asphalt Pavement,” Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. 15, No. 5, September/October 2003, pp. 427-434.
Dr. Brina Mortensen

Assistant Professor
PhD (2011), University of California, Davis

Research Interests: Bio-mediated soil improvement, identification and behavior of naturally cemented soil, and sustainable building materials.

Mortensen’s doctoral research evaluated the use of bio-mediated soil improvement as a mechanism to mitigate liquefaction-induced damage in a seismic event. Bio-mediated soil improvement is the use of the metabolic activity of natural soil bacteria to catalyze the precipitation of carbonate minerals. The mineral precipitation cements sand grains together which improves the strength and stiffness of the soil and reduces the susceptibility to damage due to earthquakes. Mortensen’s future research interests focus on continuing the development of bio-mediated soil improvement technology towards field implementation as well as improving methods to identify and characterize naturally cemented sands.

Mortensen received her BS in civil engineering from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, Calif., in 2003 and her MS in civil engineering from the University of California, Davis, in 2008. Mortensen has received the Excellence in Geotechnical Engineering Award at UC Davis and has been awarded an independent research grant from the Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society. She was also a UC Davis Professors for the Future Fellow during the 2010-2011 academic year, during which she co-developed the M3 Toolbox for graduate students to successfully mentor, manage and motivate student researchers. As a graduate student, Mortensen taught the upper division undergraduate civil engineering course, Foundation Design, and has been a teaching assistant for several years for the graduate-level soil characterization laboratory.

Before beginning her graduate studies, Mortensen worked as a geotechnical consulting engineer in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she performed field and laboratory investigations and developed foundation designs and construction recommendations for residential, commercial and governmental development projects. Mortensen is a licensed engineer in the state of California. She will join the NC State faculty in January 2012.

  • Mortensen B.M., Haber, M., DeJong, J.T., Caslake, L., Nelson, D.C. (2011). “Effects of Envi-ronmental Factors on Microbial Induced Calcite Precipitation.” Applied Microbiology, 111, 338-349.
  • Mortensen, B., Gerhard, R., DeJong, J., Weil, M., Martinez, B., Pederson, L., Wilson, D. (2011). “Fabrication, Operation, and Health Monitoring of Bender Elements for Aggressive Environments.” ASTM Journal of Geotechnical Testing, (in review).
Dr. Mohammad Pour-Ghaz

Assistant Professor
PhD (2011), Purdue University

Research Interests: Health monitoring and service life prediction of concrete structures, durability of reinforced concrete structures, non-destructive testing and in-situ sensing, flow and transport in fractured porous media, and sustainable materials for civil infrastructure.

Pour-Ghaz earned his BS in civil engineering from Tabriz University in Iran in 2003. Before pursuing his MS in civil engineering, he practiced as a research engineer in the area of nondestructive testing of composites at a research and development company in Concord, Ontario, Canada. After receiving his MS in 2007 from Carleton University in Canada, he attended Purdue University where he earned his PhD in civil engineering with an emphasis in concrete materials. While at Purdue, Pour-Ghaz received the William L. Dolch Graduate Scholarship for outstanding research in materials science and the Magoon Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Pour-Ghaz currently investigates the use of electrical methods for damage tomography in concrete structures. His research in this area involves development of new electrical imaging techniques, development and application of sensing skins for concrete elements, and development of self-sensing concrete materials. Pour-Ghaz also studies the effect of discrete fractures and distributed networks of fractures on moisture flow and transport in cement-based composites. He performs his research in this area using both experimental and numerical methods.

  • Pour-Ghaz, M., Weiss, J. Application of frequency selective circuits for crack detection in concrete elements. Journal of ASTM International. 2011; (In press).
  • Pour-Ghaz, M., Kim, J., Nadukuru, S.S., O’Connor, S., Michalowski, R.L., Bradshaw, A., Green, R.A., Lynch, J.P., Poursaee, A., Weiss, J. Using electrical, magnetic and acoustic sensors to detect damage in segmental concrete pipes subjected to permanent ground displacement. Cement and Concrete Composites. 2011; 33(7): 749-762.
  • Pour-Ghaz, M., Weiss, J. Detecting the time and location of cracks using electrically conductive surfaces. Cement and Concrete Composites. 2011; 33:116-23.
  • Pour-Ghaz, M., Isgor, O.B., Ghods, P. The effect of temperature on the corrosion of steel in concrete. Part 1: simulated polarization resistance tests and model development. Corrosion Science. 2009; 51(2):415-25.
  • Pour-Ghaz, M., Rajabipour, F., Couch, J., Weiss, J. Numerical and experimental assessment of unsaturated fluid transport in saw-cut (notched) concrete elements. In: Tanesi, J. editor. Model-ing as a Solution to Concrete Problems. ACI Special Publication. 2009; SP-266:73-86.
Dr. Emily Zechman

Assistant Professor
PhD (2005), North Carolina State University

Research Interests: Water resources planning and management, systems analysis, evolutionary com-putation, complex adaptive systems and agent-based modeling.

Zechman joined NC State’s Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering in July 2011. She graduated with her BS and MS degrees in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky. Zechman earned her PhD in civil engineering from NC State in 2005.

Her research interests are in the development of new computational methodologies to explore the influence of feedbacks among social and infrastructure systems.Her research creates new socio-technical models by integrating complex adaptive systems modeling approaches with engineering models to simulate feedback mechanisms and adaptive behaviors among consumers, infrastructure and environmental systems. New evolutionary algorithm-based approaches are coupled with socio-technical models to identify optimal adaptive strategies for managing sustainability, security and resilience of complex infrastructure and water resources systems. Specifically, she is exploring the sustainability of urban water supply and the protection of human health in water contamination incidents.

Zechman teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in water resources engineering, hydrology and systems analysis for civil engineering. She received the Best Research-Oriented Paper Award in 2010 and 2011 for her publications in the Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, a publication of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

  • Kanta, L., E.M. Zechman, and K. Brumbelow “A multi-objective evolutionary computation approach to hazards mitigation design for water distribution systems,” J Water Resources Planning and Management (in press).
  • Giacomoni, M., E.M. Zechman, and K. Brumbelow “The Hydrologic Footprint Residence: An Environmentally-friendly Criteria for Best Management Practices,” J Hydrologic Engineering, doi:10.1061/(ASCE)HE.1943-5584.0000407.
  • Zechman, E.M. (2011) “Agent-Based Modeling to Simulate Contamination Events and Evaluate Threat Management Strategies in Water Distribution Systems,” Risk Analysis 31(5), pp. 758-772, 2011.

Department of Computer Science

Dr. Randy Avent

Professor
PhD (1986), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Research Interests: Semi-structured analytics and mathematical decision sciences, signal processing, and dynamic probabilistic systems analysis of complex systems.

Avent received his BS in zoology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1980. He received an MS in electrical engineering from NC State in 1986 and his MS and PhD degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill in biomedical engineering and mathematics in 1984 and 1986, respectively. He is a graduate of the Boston Executive Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management. Prior to joining NC State’s faculty, he was the chief scientist in the Defense Department’s Office of Basic Research and the associate chief technology officer at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory (LL).

Avent has a broad range of interests and has done research in many areas, including computer science, life sciences and electrical engineering. The majority of his work, however, has been in defense. He has held several leadership and principal investigator positions at MIT/LL and has been an influential figure in radar signal processing and data analytics for national security applications. He made significant contributions to the field of automatic target recognition for both stationary and moving vehicles. He was responsible for early work in context inclusion and developed the concept of using patterns of life analysis for persistent sensing. He started two new research groups at MIT/LL that addressed key issues in analytics, data fusion, visualization and airborne communications and networking.

  • Avent, R., “Basic Research in Nanotechnology,” Conference on Nanoelectronic Devices for Defense and Security, September 28, 2009.
  • Avent, R., “Synthetic Aperture Radar: Fundamentals and Applications,” IEEE MTT-S International, June 2005.
  • Avent, R., “A Multi-sensor Architecture for Detecting High-Value Mobile Targets,” SIAM, March 2002.
  • McKellips, A., M. McClure, M. Chu and R. Avent, “Target Classification Using Spatially Flexible Directed Pursuits,” Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 4050, 2000.
  • Avent, R., and G. Benitz, “Interior Imaging Based on High-Definition Vector Imaging,” Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 3575, 1998.
Dr. Kristy Boyer

Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
PhD (2010), North Carolina State University

Research Interests: Artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, natural language dialogue systems and advanced learning technologies.

Boyer’s research focuses on advancing the state-of-the-art in natural language tutorial dialogue systems by leveraging data-driven approaches. She holds a BS in mathematics and computer science from Valdosta State University, an MS in applied statistics from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and a PhD in computer science from NC State.

  • Investigating the Relationship Between Dialogue Structure and Tutoring Effectiveness: A Hidden Markov Modeling Approach. Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Robert Phillips, Amy Ingram, Eun Young Ha, Michael D. Wallis, Mladen A. Vouk, and James C. Lester. To appear in the International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education (IJAIED), 2011.
  • The Impact of Task-Oriented Feature Sets on HMMs for Dialogue Modeling. Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Eun Young Ha, Robert Phillips, and James Lester. Proceedings of the 12th Annual SIGdial meeting on Discourse and Dialogue, Portland, Oregon, 2011, 49-58.
  • An Affect-Enriched Dialogue Act Classification Model for Task-Oriented Dialogue. Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Joseph Grafsgaard, Eun Young Ha, Robert Phillips, and James Lester. Proceedings of the 49th Annual Meeting of the Association of Computational Linguistics Human Language Technologies Conference, Portland, Oregon, 2011, 1190-1199.
  • Investigating the Role of Motivation in Computer Science Education through One-on-One Tutoring. Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Robert Phillips, Michael D. Wallis, Mladen A. Vouk, and James C. Lester. Computer Science Education, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2009, 111-136.
  • The Influence of Learner Characteristics on Task-Oriented Tutorial Dialogue. Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Mladen A. Vouk, James C. Lester. Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED ‘07), Marina Del Rey, California, 2007, (Best Student Paper Award) 365-372.
Dr. William Enck

Assistant Professor
PhD (2011), Pennsylvania State University

Research Interests: The design, optimization and measurement of security for operating systems, specifically on mobile phones, and the complex environments in which they operate.

Enck received his BS in computer engineering from Pennsylvania State University in 2004. He received his MS and PhD degrees in computer science and engineering in 2006 and 2011, respectively. His current research focuses on security concerns of smartphones and their applications. This work has been featured by many national and international press outlets.

Enck’s research interests more broadly cover systems security. His past research efforts have included telecommunications security, access control mechanisms in operating systems, hardware security, voting systems security, network security, and large-scale network configuration.

  • William Enck, Damien Octeau, Patrick McDaniel, and Swarat Chaudhuri. A Study of Android Application Security. Proceedings of the 20th USENIX Security Symposium, August 2011.
  • William Enck, Peter Gilbert, Byung-Gon Chun, Landon P. Cox , Jaeyeon Jung, Patrick McDaniel, and Anmol N. Sheth. TaintDroid: An Information-Flow Tracking System for Realtime Privacy Monitoring on Smartphones. Proceedings of the 9th USENIX Symposium on Operating Systems Design and Implementation (OSDI), October 2010.
  • William Enck, Machigar Ongtang, and Patrick McDaniel. On Lightweight Mobile Phone Application Certification. Proceedings of the 16th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), November 2009.
  • William Enck, Patrick McDaniel, Subhabrata Sen, Panagiotis Sebos, Sylke Spoerel, Albert Greenberg, Sanjay Rao, and William Aiello. Configuration Management at Massive Scale: System Design and Experience. Proceedings of the USENIX Annual Technical Conference, June 2007.
  • William Enck, Patrick Traynor, Patrick McDaniel, and Thomas La Porta. Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks. Proceedings of the 12th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), November 2005.
Dr. David Sturgill

Teaching Assistant Professor
PhD (1997), Cornell University

Research Interests: Parallel and distributed computation and competitive learning.

Sturgill completed his BS degrees in computer science and mathematics from the University of South Carolina in 1989. He earned his MS and PhD degrees in computer science from Cornell University in 1994 and 1997, respectively. Sturgill taught in the Department of Computer Science at Baylor University for 14 years, where he had served as the graduate director since 2007.

At NC State, Sturgill works with the Senior Design Center in computer science. He also serves as the director of the Association for Computing Machinery International Collegiate Programming Contest Challenge, a program-vs-program competition among teams of computer science students from universities around the world.

  • P. Edelman, M.J. Donahoo and D. Sturgill, Secure Group Communications for Delay-Tolerant Networks. In Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Conference for Internet Technology and Secured Transactions.
  • D. Sturgill, B. Van Ruitenbeek and R.J. Marks II. Image Compression and Recovery through Compressive Sampling and Particle Swarm. In Proceedings of the 2009 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics.
  • D. Sturgill and G. Pant. Evaluation Criteria for Genetically-Tuned Problem-Solving Experts. In Proceedings of the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference, July 1999.
  • D. Sturgill and A.M. Segre. Nagging: a Distributed, Adversarial Search-Pruning Technique Applied to First-Order Inference. Journal of Automated Reasoning, Dec. 1997.
  • A.M. Segre and D. Sturgill. Using Hundreds of Workstations to Solve First-Order Logic Problems. In Proceedings of the AAAI-94, August 1994.

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Dr. Iqbal Husain

Distinguished Professor
PhD (1993), Texas A&M University

Research Interests: Electric motor drives and controls; electric machines design, controls and modeling; power electronics converter design, topologies and controls; electric and hybrid vehicles; and renewable energy systems.

Husain joined NC State’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering as a distinguished professor after serving as a faculty member at the University of Akron in Ohio for 17 years.

Husain has worked extensively on the development of SR and PM motor drives for various automotive and industrial applications. He has developed several sensorless control methods for switched reluctance machine (SRM) drives. The pioneering research on modeling and analysis of SRMs allowed Husain to make unique contributions in SRM design, control, acoustic noise prediction and parameter identification methods.

The uniqueness of the SRM modeling and analysis approach is the dependence of the model on machine geometry and material property. The research on PM machines is focused on torque ripple minimization, control algorithms and vibration and noise analysis. Husain has recently been working on microinverters for solar PV systems with grid interaction. He has also been developing methods for grid synchronization of renewable energy systems.

The primary application of Husain’s work is in the transportation, automotive and aerospace industries. As a result of this exposure, Husain naturally developed courses for graduate and undergraduate education in electric and hybrid vehicles and published the textbook entitled Electric and Hybrid Vehicles: Design Fundamentals, as well as a research portfolio on electric machines and drives for transportation applications.

  • S. Underwood and I. Husain, “On-line Parameter Estimation and Adaptive Control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines,” IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, Vol. 57, No. 7, pp. 2335-2343, July 2010.
  • R. Islam, I. Husain, A. Fardoun, K. McLaughlin, “Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Magnet Designs with Skewing for Torque Ripple and Cogging Torque Reduction,” IEEE Trans. on Industry Applications, Vol. 45, No. 1, pp. 152-160, Jan.-Feb. 2009.
  • S. M. N. Hasan and I. Husain, “A Luenberger-Sliding Mode Observer for On-line Parameter Estimation and Adaptation in High-Performance Induction Motor Drives,” IEEE Trans. on Industry Applications, Vol. 45, No. 2, pp. 772-781, March-April 2009.
Dr. Edgar J. Lobaton

Assistant Professor
PhD (2009), University of California, Berkeley

Research Interests: Robotics, computer vision, control theory and sensor networks. Sample applications areas are robotic assisted surgical procedures and optimal placement and control of imaging/sensing devices for security and monitoring applications.

Lobaton received his BS degrees in mathematics and electrical engineering from Seattle University in 2004. He completed his PhD in electrical engineering and computer sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2009.

His areas of research include robotics and control, sensor networks and computer vision. He works on applications ranging from surveillance using smart camera systems to motion planning for medical robotic applications. Prior to joining NC State, he was awarded the 2009 Computer Innovation Fellows postdoctoral fellowship award and conducted research in the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was also engaged in research at Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs in 2005 and 2009.

  • E. Lobaton, R. Vasudevan, R. Bajcsy and R. Alterovitz, “Robust Topological Features for Deformation Invariant Image Matching,” International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), Spain, 2011.
  • E. Lobaton, J. Zhang, S. Patil and R. Alterovitz, “Planning Curvature-Constrained Paths to Multiple Goals Using Disk Sampling,” International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2011.
  • R. Vasudevan, G. Kurillo, E. Lobaton, T. Bernardin, O. Kreylos, R. Bajcsy and K. Nahrstedt, “High Quality Visualization for Geographically Distributed 3D Teleimmersive Applications,” IEEE Transactions on Multimedia, 13(3), 2011, 573-584.
  • E. Lobaton, R. Vasudevan, R. Bajcsy, and S.S. Sastry, “A Distributed Topological Camera Network Representation for Tracking Applications,” IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, 19(10), 2010, 2516-2529.
  • E. Lobaton and A. Bayen, “Modeling and Optimization Analysis of a Single-Flagellum Micro-Structure through the Method of Regularized Stokeslets,” IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, 17(4), 2009, 907-916.
Dr. Ömer Oralkan

Associate Professor
PhD (2004), Stanford University

Research Interests: Ultrasound imaging, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers, integrated frontend electronics for ultrasound imaging, photoacoustic imaging, image-guided therapeutics, chemical and biological sensor arrays, and ultrasound neural stimulation.

Oralkan received his BS from Bilkent University in Turkey in 1995, his MS from Clemson University in 1997 and his PhD from Stanford University in 2004, all in electrical engineering.

He was a research associate from 2004 to 2007 at the Ginzton Laboratory at Stanford and was then promoted to a senior research associate from 2007 to 2011. He served as an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Santa Clara University from 2009 to 2011.

Oralkan’s past and present research interests include electronic circuit design, semiconductor devices, micromachined sensors and medical imaging. His current research focuses on the design and implementation of integrated systems for catheter-based medical ultrasound imaging applications, image-guided therapeutics, photoacoustic imaging, chemical and biological sensor arrays and ultrasound neural stimulation.

He has authored and co-authored more than 100 publications and received the 2002 Outstanding Paper Award of the IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control Society. He is a senior member of IEEE. He will join the NC State faculty in January 2012.

  • Ö. Oralkan, A. S. Ergun, J. A. Johnson, M. Karaman, U. Demirci, K. Kaviani, T. H. Lee, and B. T. Khuri-Yakub, “Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays: next generation arrays for acoustic imaging?” IEEE Trans. Ultrason., Ferroelect., Freq. Contr., 49 (11), 1596-1610.
  • Ö. Oralkan, B. Bayram, G. G. Yaralioglu, A. S. Ergun, M. Kupnik, D. T. Yeh, I. O. Wygant, and B. T. Khuri-Yakub, “Experimental characterization of collapse-mode CMUT operation,” IEEE Trans. Ultrason., Ferroelect., Freq. Contr., 53 (8), 1513-1523.
  • I. O. Wygant, N. S. Jamal, H. J. Lee, A. Nikoozadeh, Ö. Oralkan, M. Karaman, and B. T. Khuri-Yakub, “An integrated circuit with transmit beamforming flip-chip bonded to a 2-D CMUT array for 3-D ultrasound imaging,” IEEE Trans. Ultrason., Ferroelect., Freq. Contr., 56 (10), 2145-2156.
  • B. T. Khuri-Yakub, Ö. Oralkan, and M. Kupnik, “Next-gen ultrasound,” IEEE Spectrum, 46 (5), 44-54.

Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

Dr. Yunan Liu

Assistant Professor
PhD (2011), Columbia University

Research Interests: Stochastic modeling, applied probability, queueing systems and fluid approximations.

Liu received his BS in electrical engineering from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. He received his MS in industrial engineering and operations research and a PhD in operations research from Columbia University. Liu studies queuing theory, stochastic modeling and applied probability, with applications in service systems, especially cus-tomer contact centers, manufacturing systems and health care systems. He models and approximates the system dynamics using both stochastic models and deterministic fluid approximations. Liu’s research can be used to improve capacity planning and operational control in such systems.

  • Liu, Y. and Whitt, W., 2011, “A Network of Time-Varying Many-Server Fluid Queues with Customer Abandonment.” Operations Research (forthcoming).
  • Liu, Y. and Whitt, W., 2011, “Nearly Periodic Behavior in The Overloaded G/D/S+GI Queue.” Stochastic Systems, vol. 1, pp. 1-71.
  • Liu, Y. and Whitt, W., 2011, “Large-Time Asymptotics for the G_t/M_t/s_t+GI_t Many-Server Fluid Queue with Abandonment.” Queueing Systems, vol. 67, pp. 145-182.
  • Liu, Y. and Whitt, W., 2010, “A Fluid Approximation for Large-Scale Service Systems: Extended Abstract.” Performance Evaluation Review, Special Issue on 2010 MAMA conference.
Dr. Chang S. Nam

Associate Professor
PhD (2003), Virginia Tech

Research Interests: Brain-computer interface and neurorehabilitation, haptic user interaction, cognitive ergonomics and neuroergonomics, and adaptive and intelligent human-computer interaction.

Nam received his BS in industrial engineering from Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea. He received his MS in industrial engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo and an MBA from Sogang University, also in South Korea. He received a PhD in human factors and ergonomics from the Grado Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Virginia Tech. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was an assistant professor and associate professor at the University of Arkansas, where he received the NSF CAREER Award, the College of Engineering Outstanding Researcher Award and the Best Teacher Award.

Nam teaches and conducts basic and applied research in human factors and ergonomics engineering to advance the science of human-computer interaction with a broad perspective on the application of systems and information engineering to human-centered technologies, including healthcare systems and rehabilitation engineering. Presently he studies cognitive and affective impacts of a sensory feedback-based hands-on learning experience on science education for students with and without severe visual impairments by implementing cognitively motivating and socially enriched learning principles. Nam also studies brain-computer interface technology, including noninvasive methods to monitor and obtain brain signals; effective signal processing methods that extract signal features; innovative algorithms that translate these features into device commands; and the development and evaluation of potential applications. He will continue to focus on these emerging research areas that have a real impact on the independence and quality of life of people with disabilities.

  • Nam, C. S., Jeon, Y., Kim, Y-J., Lee, I., and Park, K. (2011). Movement Imagery-Related Latralization of Event-Related (De)Synchronization (ERD/ERS): Motor-Imagery Duration Effects. Clinical Neurophysiology, 122 (3), 567-577.
  • Li, Y., Nam, C. S., Shadden, B., and Johnson, S. (2011). A P300-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI): Effects of Interface Type and Screen Size. International Journal of Human Computer Interaction, 27 (1), 52-68.
  • Nam, C. S., Li, Y., and Johnson, S. (2010). Evaluation of P300-Based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) in Real-World Contexts. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 26 (6), 621-637.
Dr. Rohan A. Shirwaiker

Assistant Professor
PhD (2011), Pennsylvania State University

Research Interests: Biomedical design and manufacturing, biomaterials for infection control, micro/nano-scale process engineering, and design decision-making and problem solving methodologies.

Shirwaiker received his BS in production engineering from the University of Mumbai in India. He received his MS and PhD degrees in industrial engineering with a specialization in manufacturing systems from Pennsylvania State University. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he completed engineering internships at Larsen & Toubro Ltd., Harley Davidson Motor Co. and QBC Diagnostics. He is a member of the Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society, the Alpha Pi Mu Industrial Engineering Honor Society, the Golden Key International Honor Society, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, and the International Society for Biofabrication.

Shirwaiker studies the design, fabrication and characterization of functional biomedical surfaces utilizing alternative antibacterial materials. His current research projects focus on the characterization and parametric modeling of silver ion and nanoparticle-based antibacterial surfaces with micro and nano-scale physical and electrical design features. He also studies additive manufacturing processes for applications in tissue engineering. All of these topics are investigated using both theory and experimental techniques.

  • R.A. Shirwaiker, R.A. Wysk, S. Kariyawasam, H. Carrion, and R.C. Voigt (2011) “Micro-scale fabrication and characterization of a silver-polymer based electrically activated antibacterial surface,” Biofabrication, 3(1), 015003.
  • R.A. Wysk, W.J. Sebastianelli, R.A. Shirwaiker, G.M. Bailey, C. Charumani, M. Kennett, A. Kaucher, R. Abrahams, T.A. Fuller, P. Royer, R.C. Voigt and P.H. Cohen (2010) “Prophylactic bactericidal orthopedic implants — animal testing study,” Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering, 3(9), 917-926.
  • T. Fuller, R. Wysk, C. Charumani, M. Kennett, W. Sebastiennelli, R. Abrahams, R.A. Shirwaiker, R. Voigt and P. Royer (2010) “Developing an engineered antimicrobial/prophylactic system using electrically activated bactericidal metals,” Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine,21(7), 2103-2114.
  • R.A. Shirwaiker and G.E. Okudan (2008) “TRIZ and axiomatic design: a review of case-studies and a proposed synergistic use,” Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing, 19(1), 33-47.

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Dr. Linyou Cao

Assistant Professor
PhD (2010), Stanford University

Research Interests: Plasmonics and semiconductor nanophotonics, nanoscale optoelectronic devices, charge dynamics in nanostructures, nanoscale photocatalysis and high-resolution chemical imaging.

Cao received his BS in chemistry from Fudan University and his MS from Peking University before coming to the United States. He received his PhD from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. His recognitions include the Miller Research Fellowship at UC Berkeley, the Kavli Nanoscience Institute Prize Postdoctoral Fellowship at Caltech, and the ACS Division Inorganic Chemistry Young Investigator Award.

Cao’s research interests include better understanding the fundamental properties of photons and charge carriers in nanostructured materials, and eventually translating this fundamental understanding into powerful predictive tools for rational design of novel photonic devices with applications in a wide variety of fields, ranging from energy utilization and environment remediation to information technology and biotechnology.

  • L. Cao and M. L. Brongersma, “Active plasmonics: Ultrafast developments,” Nature Photonics, vol. 3, pp. 12-13, Jan 2009.
  • L. Y. Cao, P. Y. Fan, E. S. Barnard, A. M. Brown, and M. L. Brongersma, “Tuning the color of silicon nanostructures,” Nano Letters, vol. 10, pp. 2649-2654, Jul 2010.
  • L. Y. Cao, P. Y. Fan, A. P. Vasudev, J. S. White, Z. F. Yu, W. S. Cai, J. A. Schuller, S. H. Fan, and M. L. Brongersma, “Semiconductor nanowire optical antenna solar absorbers,” Nano Letters, vol. 10, pp. 439-445, Feb 2010.
  • L. Y. Cao, B. Nabet, and J. E. Spanier, “Enhanced raman scattering from individual semiconductor nanocones and nanowires,” Physical Review Letters, vol. 96, Apr 21 2006.
  • L. Y. Cao, J. S. White, J. S. Park, J. A. Schuller, B. M. Clemens, and M. L. Brongersma, “Engineering light absorption in semiconductor nanowire devices,” Nature Materials, vol. 8, pp. 643-647, Aug 2009.
Dr. Ramón R. Collazo

Assistant Professor
PhD (2002), North Carolina State University

Research Interests: Optoelectronic/power materials and devices; III-N wide bandgap semiconductors; polar materials, including nitrides and oxides; materials optical characterization and nonlinear optics.

Collazo received his BS in physics from the University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, and has been involved in growth and characterization of wide band gap semiconductor thin films, especially nitrides and diamond, for the past 11 years. He has been particularly involved in developing a process for controlling the polarity in III-nitrides to develop lateral polarity homojunctions along with their application to the first lateral p/n junction.

Additionally, he has been involved in the development of AlN bulk single crystal substrates, their surface preparation, and further epitaxial thin film deposition for optoelectronics and power device applications. He was awarded the Facundo Bueso Medal for Physics and has authored more than 60 publications and given presentations at national and international conferences.

  • R. Dalmau, B. Moody, R. Schlesser, S. Mita, J. Xie, M. Feneberg, B. Neuschl, K. Thonke, R. Collazo, A. Rice, J. Tweedie, and Z. Sitar, “Growth and characterization of AlN and AlGaN epitaxial films on AlN single crystal substrates,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, vol. 158, pp. H530-H535, 2011.
  • S. Mita, R. Collazo, A. Rice, R. F. Dalmau, and Z. Sitar, “Influence of gallium supersaturation on the properties of GaN grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 104, Jul 1 2008.
  • S. Mita, R. Collazo, and Z. Sitar, “Fabrication of a GaN lateral polarity junction by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition,” Journal of Crystal Growth, vol. 311, pp. 3044-3048, May 1 2009.
  • A. Rice, R. Collazo, J. Tweedie, R. Dalmau, S. Mita, J. Xie, and Z. Sitar, “Surface preparation and homoepitaxial deposition of AlN on (0001)-oriented AlN substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 108, Aug 15 2010.
  • A. Rice, R. Collazo, J. Tweedie, J. Xie, S. Mita, and Z. Sitar, “Linear dependency of Al-mole fraction with group-III precursor flows in AlxGa1-xN (0 <= x <= 1) deposition by LP OMVPE,” Journal of Crystal Growth, vol. 312, pp. 1321-1324, Apr 1 2010.
Dr. Elizabeth C. Dickey

Professor
PhD (1997), Northwestern University

Research Interests: Point-defect equilibrium and transport in metal oxides, grain boundary and interfacial phenomena, nanomaterials, ceramic composites, and electron microscopy.

Dickey received her BS in materials engineering from the University of Kentucky and her PhD in materials science and engineering from Northwestern University under an NSF graduate research fellowship. Her academic and research interests include functional oxide ceramics, interface materials science, high-temperature ceramic composites and nanomaterials. Common to these research programs is quantitative structural and chemical analysis from the micrometer to atomic length scales.

Dickey has more than 100 peer-reviewed publications. She was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for her work on metal-ceramic interfaces in 1999 and became a Fellow of the American Ceramic Society in 2010. She has held several leadership positions within the American Ceramic Society, including the Chair of the Basic Sciences Division. She served as an editor for Microscopy and Microanalysis and is currently an associate editor for the Journal of the American Ceramic Society.

  • R.M. White, J.M. Kunkle, A.V. Polotai, E.C. Dickey, “Microstructure and hardness scaling in laser-processed B4C-TiB2 eutectic ceramics,” Journal of the European Ceramic Society, vol. 31, pp. 1227–1232, 2011.
  • J. Li, B. D. Gauntt, and E. C. Dickey, “Microtwinning in highly nonstoichiometric VOx thin films,” Acta Materialia, vol. 58, pp. 5009-5014, Sep 2010.
  • X. Li, M. W. Finnis, J. He, R. K. Behera, S. R. Phillpot, S. B. Sinnott, and E. C. Dickey, “Energetics of charged point defects in rutile TiO2 by density functional theory,” Acta Materialia, vol. 57, pp. 5882-5891, 2009.
  • J. D. Sloppy, D. D. Macdonald, and E. C. Dickey, “Growth laws of bilayer anodized tantalum oxide films formed in phosphoric acid,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, vol. 157, pp. C157-C165, 2010.
  • X. Weng, W. Tian, D. G. Schlom, and E. C. Dickey, “Structure and chemistry of the (111)Sc2O3/(0001) GaN epitaxial interface,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 96, Jun 14 2010.
Dr. Frank Hunte

Assistant Professor
PhD (2004), University of Minnesota

Research Interests: Magnetic materials, interfacial exchange interactions in thin film heterostructures, ferromagnetic semiconductors; flux pinning in high temperature superconductors by magnetic nano-particles; plasma processing of materials including RF and DC magnetron sputtering.

Hunte received his BS and MS degrees in physics from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. He was a postdoctoral researcher and a visiting assistant scholar/scientist at the Applied Superconductivity Center within the Magnets and Materials Division of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University before joining the NC State faculty.

His research investigates magnetic materials and thin film heterostructures, including semiconductors and superconductors, processing methods, functionality and operating environments (thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic), from basic materials physics to technological applications. He is currently focused on ferromagnetic semiconductors which retain ferromagnetism at room temperature and memristors. Hunte also studies the relationship between magnetism and superconductivity in the family of unconventional multiband superconductors known as ferropnictides where magnetic correlations appear strongly.

  • F. Hunte, J. Jaroszynski, A. Gurevich, D. C. Larbalestier, R. Jin, A. S. Sefat, M. A. McGuire, B. C. Sales, D. K. Christen, and D. Mandrus, “Two-band superconductivity in LaFeAsO0.89F0.11 at very high magnetic fields,” Nature,vol. 453, pp. 903-905, Jun 12 2008.
  • J. Jaroszynski, F. Hunte, L. Balicas, Y. J. Jo, I. Raicevic, A. Gurevich, D. C. Larbalestier, F. F. Balakirev, L. Fang, P. Cheng, Y. Jia, and H. H. Wen, “Upper critical fields and thermally-activated transport of NdFeAsO0.7F0.3 single crystal,” Physical Review B, vol. 78, Nov 2008.
  • D. Venus and F. Hunte, “Competition between magnetic relaxation mechanisms in exchange-coupled CoO/Co bilayers,” Physical Review B, vol. 72, Jul 2005.
  • D. Venus, F. Hunte, and E. D. Dahlberg, “Contribution of low-temperature degrees of freedom to the anisotropy in Co/CoO exchange coupled bilayers,” Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, vol. 286, pp. 191-195, Feb 1 2005.
  • D. Venus, F. Hunte, I. N. Krivorotov, T. Gredig, and E. D. Dahlberg, “Magnetic relaxation in exchange-coupled Co/CoO bilayers measured with ac-anisotropic magnetoresistance,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 93, pp. 8609-8611, May 15 2003.
Dr. Albena Ivanisevic

Associate Professor
PhD (2000), University of Wisconsin-Madison

Research Interests: Massively parallel manufacturing of nanoscale structures with magnetic and metallic properties; high-resolution and -throughput surface characterization and lithographic tools for tissue engineering applications; and fabrication and characterization of semiconductor surfaces composed of biomolecular structures.

Ivanisevic received a BS in chemistry from Drake University and was inspired to pursue a PhD after doing undergraduate research in organic synthesis. She has received the MIT Technology Review’s TR100 Award: Top 100 Young Innovators (2004), the NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship (2004), and the National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship (Northwestern University, 2000-2002).

Ivanisevic’s research is centered on using surface techniques to immobilize biomolecules on inorganic and tissue surfaces. The work utilizes a broad perspective on problems in chemistry, materials and biomedical engineering and is aimed to address the need to understand how to manipulate and tailor the properties of surfaces for the fabrication of better sensor and tissue platforms. All projects involve the fabrication of new platforms for placement and evaluation of materials and permit one to do basic research that enables the tuning of materials properties. Many aspects of her projects are also interfaced with finding solutions for biomedical problems.

  • H. Jaganathan and A. Ivanisevic, “In vitro cytotoxic evaluation of metallic and magnetic dna-templated nanostructures,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, vol. 2, pp. 1407-1413, May 2010.
  • M. A. Kramer, H. Jaganathan, and A. Ivanisevic, “Serial and parallel dip-pen nano lithography using a colloidal probe tip,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 132, pp. 4532, Apr 7 2010.
  • M. S. Makowski, D. Y. Zemlyanov, and A. Ivanisevic, “Olefin metathesis reaction on GaN (0001) surfaces,” Applied Surface Science, vol. 257, pp. 4625-4632, Mar 1 2011.
  • D. N. Richards, D. Y. Zemlyanov, R. M. Asrar, Y. Y. Chokshi, E. M. Cook, T. J. Hinton, X. R. Lu, V. Q. Nguyen, N. K. Patel, J. R. Usher, S. Vaidyanathan, D. A. Yeung, and A. Ivanisevic, “DNA immobilization on GaP(100) investigated by kelvin probe force microscopy,” Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 114, pp. 15486-15490, Sep 16 2010.
Dr. Thom LaBean

Associate Professor
PhD (1993), University of Pennsylvania

Research Interests: Self-assembling materials designed from engineered and synthetic biopolymers for applications in nanomedicine and in nanofabrication of electronic and photonic devices; bio-inspired molecular materials with micron-scale dimensions and nanometer-scale features; and artificial, programmable biomineralization.

LaBean earned his BS in biochemistry from the Honors College at Michigan State University and his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Pennsylvania. He studied protein design as a postdoctoral fellow at Duke University and later studied structural DNA nanotechnology and served as research professor in Duke’s departments of Computer Science, Chemistry, and Biomedical Engineering.

Throughout his career, LaBean has studied the structure, evolution and engineering of biopolymers (biomacromolecules and materials assembled from them). Current research projects involve the design, construction and testing of self-assembling DNA nanostructures for applications in molecular materials, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, molecular robotics, and nanomedicine. Potential applications include the further miniaturization of electronics circuits and devices, creation of stimulus responsive constructs for chemo- and bio-sensing, and molecular therapeutics with inherent computational function.

  • J. D. Carter and T. H. LaBean, “Organization of inorganic nanomaterials via programmable DNA self-assembly and peptide molecular recognition,” ACS Nano, vol. 5, pp. 2200-2205, Mar 2011.
  • M. N. Hansen, A. M. Zhang, A. Rangnekar, K. M. Bompiani, J. D. Carter, K. V. Gothelf, and T. H. LaBean, “Weave tile architecture construction strategy for DNA nanotechnology,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 132, pp. 14481-14486, Oct 20 2010.
  • H. Y. Li, J. D. Carter, and T. H. LaBean, “Nanofabrication by DNA self-assembly,” Materials Today, vol. 12, pp. 24-32, May 2009.
  • E. C. Samano, M. Pilo-Pais, S. Goldberg, B. N. Vogen, G. Finkelstein, and T. H. LaBean, “Self-assembling DNA templates for programmed artificial biomineralization,” Soft Matter, vol. 7, pp. 3240-3245, 2011.
  • H. Yan, S. H. Park, G. Finkelstein, J. H. Reif, and T. H. LaBean, “DNA-templated self-assembly of protein arrays and highly conductive nanowires,” Science, vol. 301, pp. 1882-1884, Sep 26 2003.
Dr. James LeBeau

Assistant Professor
PhD (2010), University of California at Santa Barbara

Research Interests: Scanning transmission electron microscopy; atomic configuration at defects; interfaces between heterogeneous materials; and quantitative imaging and diffraction in electron microscopy.

LeBeau received his BS in materials science and engineering in 2006 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He joined the Materials Science and Engineering faculty in Janu-ary 2011.

LeBeau’s research interests focus on applying and developing transmission electron microscopy techniques to determine the atomic structure of material defects, thus providing insight into observed properties. This is of particular importance as electron-ic devices scale to ever vanishingly small dimensions when the detailed arrangement of atoms at interfaces begins to critically influence material properties.  One technique, atomic resolution high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission elec-tron microscopy, is emphasized because the images are directly interpretable and the intensities depend sensitively upon the number and type of atoms present. Having shown that HAADF images from experiment agree quantitatively with simulations, LeBeau is interested in exploring the detailed image intensities to provide information about the atomic structure without the need for calibration standards.

  • J. M. LeBeau, R. Engel-Herbert, B. Jalan, J. Cagnon, P. Moetakef, S. Stemmer, and G. B. Stephenson, “Stoichiometry optimization of homoepitaxial oxide thin films using x-ray diffraction,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 95, Oct 5 2009.
  • J. M. LeBeau, S. D. Findlay, L. J. Allen, and S. Stemmer, “Quantitative atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy,” Physical Review Letters, vol. 100, May 23, 2008.
  • J. M. LeBeau, S. D. Findlay, L. J. Allen, and S. Stemmer, “Position averaged convergent beam electron diffraction: Theory and applications,” Ultramicroscopy, vol. 110, pp. 118-125, Jan 2010.
  • J. M. LeBeau, S. D. Findlay, X. Q. Wang, A. J. Jacobson, L. J. Allen, and S. Stemmer, “High-angle scattering of fast electrons from crystals containing heavy elements: Simulation and experiment,” Physical Review B, vol. 79, Jun 2009.
  • J. M. LeBeau, Q. O. Hu, C. J. Palmstrom, and S. Stemmer, “Atomic structure of postgrowth annealed epitaxial Fe/(001) GaAs interfaces,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 93, Sep 22 2008.

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Dr. Chih-Hao Chang

Assistant Professor
PhD (2008), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests: Design and fabrication of multifunctional nanostructured materials, optical properties of subwavelength structures, and nanomanufacturing using lithography and self-assembly processes.

Chang received his BS in mechanical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2002. He received his MS and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2004 and 2008, respectively. After graduation, Chang was a postdoctoral research associate at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Centre in Singapore for one year before returning to MIT to finish his postdoctoral work.

Presently he studies the optical and wetting behaviors of high aspect-ratio nanoscale cone structures, demonstrating glass with anti-glare and self-cleaning properties. Chang also works on the integration of nanomaterials on diffractive optics, resulting in energy-efficient hierarchical nano/microstructures. At the same time, he also develops novel nanofabrication techniques, focusing on processes that are scalable for manufacturing.

  • C.-H. Chang, L. Tian, W. Hesse, H. Gao, H. J. Choi, M. Siddiqui, and G. Barbastathis, “From 2-dimensional self-assembly to 3-dimensional nanolithography,” Nano Lett., 11(6), 2533–2537 (2011).
  • C.-H. Chang, J. A. Dominguez-Caballero, H. J. Choi, and G. Barbastathis, “Nanostructured gradient-index antireflection diffractive optics,” Opt. Lett., 36, 2354-2356 (2011).
  • C.-H. Chang, H. J. In, S. Takahashi, M. Deterre, H. J. Choi, K. W. Gotrik, and G. Barbastathis, “Assembling Nanoparticle Catalysts with Nanospheres for Periodic Carbon Nanotube Structure Growth,” Nanotechnology, 22, 035301 (2011).
  • C.-H. Chang, L. Waller, and G. Barbastathis, “Design and optimization of broadband wide-angle antireflection structures for binary diffractive optics,” Opt. Lett., 35, 907-909 (2010).
  • C.-H. Chang, C.-W. Tan, J. Miao, and G. Barbastathis, “Self-assembled ferrofluid lithography: patterning micro and nanostructures by controlling magnetic nanoparticles,” Nanotechnology, 20, 495301 (2009).
Dr. Yun Jing

Assistant Professor
PhD (2009), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Research Interests: Ultrasound tomography for biomedical imaging with applications to brain and breast imaging, numerical algorithms for predicting acoustic wave behavior in various media, and acoustics of meta-materials for sub-wavelength imaging and energy harvesting.

Jing received his BS in electronic science and engineering from Nanjing University in China in 2006 and his MS from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2007. He received his PhD in architectural acoustics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2009. Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he was a research fellow at Brigham and Women’s Hospital at Harvard Medical School. He specializes in the development of analytic and numerical methods for linear and nonlinear wave propagation in fluids. His theoretical work involves the derivation of exact, asymptotic and numerical solutions and the analysis of their mathematical and physical properties.

  • Yun Jing, Du Shen and Greg Clement, Verification of the Westervelt equation for focused transducers, IEEE Transactions on UFFC, 58, 2011, pp. 1097-1101.
  • Yun Jing and Greg Clement, Evaluation of a wave vector frequency domain method for nonlinear wave propagation, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 129, 2011, pp. 32-46.
  • Yun Jing, Edward Larsen and Ning Xiang, One-dimensional transport equation models for sound energy propagation in long spaces: Theory, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 127, 2010, pp. 2312-2322.
  • Yun Jing and Ning Xiang, One-dimensional transport equation models for sound energy propagation in long spaces: simulations and experimental results, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 127, 2010, pp. 2323-2331.
  • Yun Jing and Ning Xiang, On boundary conditions for the diffusion equation in room-acoustic prediction: Theory, simulations, and experiments, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 123, 2008, pp. 145-153.

Department of Nuclear Engineering

Dr. Igor A. Bolotnov

Assistant Professor
PhD (2008), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Research Interest: Direct numerical simulation of single and multiphase turbulent flows and development of closure laws for modeling of these flows; application of various flow modeling approaches to nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics problems; and spectral models development for multiphase turbulence.

Bolotnov received his BS in applied mathematics and informatics from Bashkir State University in Ufa, Russia. He received his MS and PhD degrees in engineering physics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Prior to joining the NC State faculty, he worked as a postdoctoral research associate at RPI.

Presently he studies multiphase flows, primarily in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics applications. Numerical simulations of those flows at different scales are of particular interest. Direct numerical simulation of bubble interactions with turbulence, interface tracking and development of new computational fluid dynamics models using high performance computing is one of his research areas. Phenomenological understanding of boiling phenomena, two-phase flow heat transfer and different flow regimes is another integral part of his research.

  • “Detached Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Two-phase Bubbly Channel Flow,” I.A. Bolotnov, K.E. Jansen, D.A. Drew, A.A. Oberai, R.T. Lahey, Jr. and M.Z. Podowski, Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 37, 647-659 (2011).
  • “Spectral Analysis of Turbulence Based on the DNS of a Channel Flow,” I.A. Bolotnov, R.T. Lahey, Jr., D.A. Drew, K.E. Jansen and A.A. Oberai, Computers & Fluids, 39, 640-655 (2010).
  • “Multiscale Computer Simulation of Fission Gas Discharge during Loss-of-Flow Accident in Sodium Fast Reactor,” I.A. Bolotnov, F. Behafarid, D. Shaver, T. Guo, S. Wang, S.P. Antal, K.E. Jansen, R. Samulyak, H. Wei, M.Z. Podowski, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency & IAEA Workshop (CFD4NRS-3) Experimental Validation and Application of CFD and CMFD Codes to Nuclear Reactor Safety Issues, Washington D.C., USA, 14–16 September 2010.
  • Jansen, R. Samulyak, H. Wei, M.Z. Podowski, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency & IAEA Workshop (CFD4NRS-3) Experimental Validation and Application of CFD and CMFD Codes to Nuclear Reactor Safety Issues, Washington D.C., USA, 14–16 September 2010.
  • “Two Phase Cross Jet in a Fuel Rod Assembly Using DNS/Level-Set Method,” F. Behafarid, I.A. Bolotnov, M.Z. Podowski and K.E. Jansen, 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF-2010), Tampa, FL, May 30 – June 4, 2010.
Dr. John Mattingly

Associate Professor
PhD (1998), University of Tennessee

Research Interests: Neutron and gamma time-correlation, coincidence and multiplicity counting, spec-trometry, and imaging applied to nuclear nonproliferation and counterterrorism; radiation transport modeling applied to the design of neutron and gamma measurement systems; and inverse radiation transport methods to analyze neutron and gamma measurements.

Mattingly received his BS, MS and PhD degrees in nuclear engineering from the University of Tennessee. In 1995 he was awarded a postgraduate research fellowship at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and in 1997, he joined the technical staff at ORNL, where he was promoted to the senior staff in 2002. In 2003 Mattingly was hired as a principal member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM.

While at ORNL, Mattingly developed active neutron interrogation systems and analysis methods based on neutron time-correlation for nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards. At SNL, he developed inverse radiation transport methods to analyze gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity measurements for nuclear nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and emergency response applications. Mattingly also served as a 24/7 on-call emergency response radiation analyst for the US Departments of Energy and Homeland Security.

At NC State, Mattingly plans to develop a program of education and research in radiation detection for nuclear security applications. The primary technical focus of this program, which evolves from Mattingly’s earlier work, will be to apply inverse modeling methods to analyze radiation measurements.

  • J. K. Mattingly, D. J. Mitchell, and L. T. Harding, “Experimental Validation of a Coupled Neutron-Photon Inverse Radiation Transport Solver,” invited paper, Symposium on Radiation Measurements and Applications, May 2010. Also published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section A, article in press, available online, 2011.
  • J. K. Mattingly and D. J. Mitchell, “A Framework for the Solution of Inverse Radiation Transport Problems,” Transactions on Nuclear Science, Vol. 75 No. 6, December 2010.
  • C. Yi, G. Sjoden, J. Mattingly, and T. Corau, “Computationally Optimized Multi-group Cross Section Data Collapsing using the YGROUP Code,” American Nuclear Society PHYSOR Topical Meeting, May 2010.
  • J. K. Mattingly, “Computation of Neutron Multiplicity Statistics using Deterministic Transport,” IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, October 2009.

Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science

Dr. Alexander Bogdanovich

Research Professor
Dr. Sci. (1987), Kazan State University, Russia

Research Interests: Textile composites, nanocomposites, computational modeling and finite element analysis, solid mechanics, structural dynamics, impact and blast, and damage and fracture mechanics.

Bogdanovich received his MS in physics from Latvian State University in Riga, Latvia, in 1972 and his PhD in solid mechanics from the Latvian Academy of Sciences, also in Riga, in 1975. Prior to his present employment with NC State, which began in July 2011, Bogdanovich was vice president for research and development at 3TEX, Inc., which is located in Cary, NC. He held this position from 1998 to 2011. Bogdanovich was a senior research scientist in AdTech Systems Research, Inc. in Dayton, Ohio, from 1995 to 1998 and a research associate professor with NC State from 1991 to 1995. He also held positions of increasing responsibility at the Institute of Polymer Mechanics at the Latvian Academy of Sciences. He was a junior research scientist from 1975 to 1978, a senior research scientist from 1978 to 1986, and a deputy director for research from 1986 to 1990.

Bogdanovich has received numerous awards and recognition for his research work. He placed first in the Outstanding Paper Awards category at the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering conferences in 2003 and 2006 and received the Friedrich Tsander Memorial Award for Best Research in Physico-Mathematical and Technical Sciences from the Latvian Academy of Sciences in 1987.

Presently he studies three-dimensional fabric preforms and their composites and carbon nanotube textiles and their composites. He also develops and applies multi-scale computational modeling and 3D analysis methods for predicting static, dynamic, damage and fracture properties and the behavior of composite materials and structures.

  • Bogdanovich, A. E. and Mohamed, M. H., “Three-dimensional reinforcements for composites.” SAMPE J. 2009, Vol. 45, No. 6, 8-28.
  • Bogdanovich, A. E., “Multi-scale modeling, stress and failure analyses of 3-D woven composites.” J. of Materials Science. 2006, Vol. 41, No. 20, 6547-6590.
  • Bogdanovich, A. E. and Pastore, C. M., Mechanics of Textile and Laminated Composities, Chapman & Hall, London, 1996.
  • Bogdanovich, A. E., Non-linear Dynamic Problems for Composite Cylindrical Shells, Elsevier, London, 1993.
Dr. Jesse S. Jur

Assistant Professor
PhD (2007), North Carolina State University

Research Interests: Hybrid materials, nanotechnology, surface modification, fibers and polymers, technical textiles and textile structures.

Jur received his BS in chemical engineering from the University of South Carolina and his MS in chemical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. After earning his PhD in materials science and engineering from NC State, Jur was a research faculty member in the university’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering before joining its College of Textiles. Jur also has experience in the microelectronics industry, working on process design at NeoPhotonics Corp. in San Jose, Calif.; AMD Corp.; IBM Corp. in East Fishkill, NY; and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, Calif.

Jur’s research targets the understanding of materials processing methods for producing and controlling nanoscale inorganic modification to polymer fiber structures. These novel hybrid (organic-inorganic) textile materials are of particular interest for electronic, optical, catalytic and mechanical enhancements.

  • Jur, J. S., Sweet, W. J., Oldham, C. J., and Parsons, G. N., 2011, “Atomic Layer Deposition of Conductive Coatings on Cotton, Paper, and Synthetic Fibers: Conductivity Analysis and Functional Chemical Sensing using ‘All-Fiber’ Capacitors” Advanced Functional Material, 21 (11), 1993-2002.
  • Jur, J. S., and Parsons, G. N., 2011, “Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 and ZnO at Atmospheric Pressure in a Flow Tube Reactor” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 3, 299-308.
  • Jur, J. S., Spagnola, J. C., Lee, K., Gong, B., Peng, Q., and Parsons, G. N., 2010, “Temperature-Dependent Sub-Surface Film Growth during Atomic Layer Deposition on Polypropylene and Cellulose Fibers” Langmuir, 26 (11), 8239-8244.
  • Spagnola, J. C., Gong, B., Arvidson, S. A., Jur, J. S., Khan, S., and Parsons, G. N., 2010, “Surface and sub-surface reactions during low temperature aluminium oxide atomic layer deposition on fiber-forming polymers” Journal of Materials Chemistry, 20 (20), 4213-4222.
  • LeBeau, J. M., Jur, J. S., Lichtenwalner, D. J., Craft, H. S., Maria, J.-P., Kingon, A. I., Klenov, D. O., Cagnon J., and Stemmer, S., 2008, “High Temperature Stability of Hf-based Gate Dielectric Stacks with Rare-earth Oxide Layers for Threshold Voltage” Applied Physics Letters, 92 (11), 112912.